Tag Archives: Workplaces

3 ways to make meeting spaces, workplaces sustainable

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Green office spaces can boost health and productivity, and business owners are looking for ways to become eco-friendlier.

Whether one works from a home office or owns a small business or a large corporation, there are ways to reduce the environmental footprint of the business, in return decreasing costs associated with energy consumption, to lower the cost of business and create a healthier workspace environment.

Visionect recently introduced the Joan Meeting Room Assistant, an energy efficient digital door label and meeting room scheduling solution. Here are three trends in meeting spaces, according to the company, that promote a sustainable workplace:

  • Promote green office practices: If you want an environmentally friendly office space design, ensure that your meeting space promotes green office practices. Some ways to ensure that your office is green is to go digital. Physical calendars for meeting room reservations are not very green. Getting a digital conference room reservation system reduces unnecessary waste. Other green office practices include telecommuting or using public transit, business casual attire and powering down at night when it comes to shutting down unused devices to save on the overall energy bill.
     
  • LEED certification score and environmentally friendly office products: The U.S. Green Building Council created a scoring system to rate the greenness of a building. The scoring system is called Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The highest potential LEED score is 110. Based on the number of points a building earns, it will receive one of four ratings: certified (40+), silver (50+), gold (60+) and platinum (80+). The points are weighted based on environmental impact. Achieving a high LEED certification score can be done by incorporating three green friendly factors; green construction methods, sustainable materials, and energy-efficient systems into the building process. When designing a meeting room, ensure they meet the LEED certification score by buying eco-friendly office furniture.
     
  • Use environmentally friendly office products: Environmentally friendly office products can range from reusable pens, to LED lamps and bulbs, to recycled paper and rechargeable batters, as long as you research and replace what can be more eco-friendly in your office, you are closer to being green. When it comes to reusable pens, stop throwing away pens and start using reusable ones. Even when it comes to ink and toner cartridges, each reused cartridge saves 2.5 pounds of metal and plastic and half a gallon of oil. Plus, it costs about 1.5 times less than new cartridges.

Topics: Architectural Firms, Automation and Controls, Building Owners and Managers, Energy Saving Products, Great Commercial Buildings, Office Buildings, Sustainable Communities, Technology, USGBC


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ASID Foundation to Award 2017 Transform Grants

The ASID Foundation is pleased to accept proposals for its sixth annual Transform Grants from January 6 – March 15, 2017. This year, the Foundation will continue its mission to elevate the impact of interior design by funding evidence-based research on how interior design can foster well-being for all. 

The need to strive toward everyday wellness in the built environment and to foster well-being through the spaces we design has become a mainstream goal, but research suggests that access to well-being is not easily available to those working on or below the poverty line. Those families and individuals who may be most in need of healthy residences, schools, workplaces, and municipal buildings may be the least likely to have access to them.

Awarded annually, the Transform Grants support applied research in interior design and human behavior. In 2017, the Foundation will award up to $100,000 to evidence-based research projects that address interior design or policy solutions that use space to enhance one or more elements of well-being for all. The ASID Foundation considers the five elements of well-being to be physical, social (mental/emotional), financial, career, and community.

The Transform Grants include two types of research studies:

Grant A – Seed/Start-up Funds: Up to $30,000 to support the exploration or pilot phase of broader research initiatives. Must be completed in nine months or less.

Grant B – Research Project: Up to $70,000 to investigate how design can transform lives. Must be completed in 18 months or less.

“The importance of using the power of design to support vulnerable groups in need of physical, mental, and social well-being has never been more important,” said ASID Foundation Chair Patrick J. Schmidt, FASID, RID. “Design interventions can improve the quality of life for populations in need and provide everyday health, safety, and wellness to them. The ASID Foundation looks forward to receiving proposals that explore the potential of interior design to promote well-being for all people, regardless of socio-economic status.”

A panel of expert judges will evaluate submissions and prioritize the top five studies for each grant type. The ASID Foundation’s Board of Trustees will make the final funding decisions. The evaluation criteria is based on the significance of the study, the innovativeness of research questions, the feasibility of budget and timeline, the strength and breadth of the target audience reach, and the overall quality of the submission.

The deadline for submissions is March 15, 2017. For a complete description of guidelines and additional information, download the rfp.

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About ASID Foundation
The ASID Foundation advances the interior design profession by drawing upon its resources to promote meaningful collaboration and research, award scholarships, and fund projects that broaden the value of interior design. Created in 1975, the ASID Foundation’s mission is to support endeavors that capture and disseminate knowledge, encourage innovation, and benefit the health, safety, and welfare of the public through interior design research, scholarships, and education. The Foundation’s current initiatives include the a comprehensive scholarship program; the National Building Museum Capital Council; The 1+ project with Public Architecture; and the Transform Research Grants. Visit asidfoundation.org for more information.

About ASID
The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) believes that design transforms lives. ASID serves the full range of the interior design profession and practice through the Society’s programs, networks, and advocacy. We thrive on the strength of cross-functional and interdisciplinary relationships among designers of all specialties, including workplace, healthcare, retail and hospitality, education, institutional, and residential. We lead interior designers in shared conversations around topics that matter: from evidence-based and humancentric design to social responsibility, well-being, and sustainability. We showcase the impact of design on the human experience and the value interior designers provide.

ASID was founded 40 years ago when two organizations became one, but its legacy dates back to the early 1930s. As we celebrate nearly 85 years of industry leadership, we are leading the future of interior design, continuing to integrate the advantages of local connections with national reach, of small firms with big, and of the places we live with the places we work, play, and heal. Learn more at asid.org.

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WHY AUTHENTIC IS ALWAYS GOOD DESIGN

Primo Orpilla, FIIDA, Principal and Co-founder of Studio O+A

I’m often asked for my definition of “good design.” Like design itself, the answer to that question changes constantly. When I first started in this industry 30 years ago, good design was all about efficiency—getting function out of a space by arranging its occupants in tidy, reproducible patterns. When tech came along with its “question everything” culture, good design became more focused on meeting individual needs—the need for comfort, for self-expression, for really good coffee somewhere nearby.

GOOD DESIGN EQUALS COMMUNITY

Today, I think good design has evolved into a broader concept of community, an environment that functions as a healthy and meaningful ecosystem. Through all these definitions one thing has remained constant: good design is authentic. If that sounds like Dieter Rams’ 11th principle, it’s probably because it grows from the same roots that sprouted Dieter’s other 10—humility and integrity. Everyone recognizes and responds to quality. You don’t have to have a maker’s temperament to feel the value in something that was lovingly crafted and put together with pride.

As a designer of workplaces and, more recently, of workplace furniture, I have come to understand the impact subtle interactions with texture have on the way we feel about our day—the sound a knuckle rapped on solid wood makes, the depth of color in a true ceramic tile, the subtle message of reassurance we get from settling onto real leather. These are pleasures available only in the original.

More Community Design: Advocacy in Design

REPRODUCTIONS CAN’T REPRODUCE THEM.

For that reason, I always encourage clients to use authentic Herman Miller or Knoll products. These iconic designs are timeless because the tradition of quality they represent never expires. That quality should not be undermined with fakes. I am also on the lookout for new artisans and authentic manufacturers—the Charles and Ray Eames of the future. The design industry has created a highly receptive market for companies and individuals dedicated to creating and distributing original work.

O+A is always happy when we can specify products from MASH Studios or Dsegnare. Even happier when we can work with those fine craftsmen and women to make custom items for our custom interiors. When I was partnering with Kimball Office on the design for my multi-functional workstation, Canopy, I realized a truly successful product encompassed all of the definitions of good design—it was efficient, it met the user’s individual needs, it contributed to the healthy ecosystem of the workplace. To touch all those bases, to make something that will evolve alongside the changing values of accelerating times, it is necessary to slow down and do the careful, attentive work that only comes from original effort.

You can’t knock off quality. Knock your knuckles on a table to hear why.

 


Primo Orpilla is the co?founder of Studio O+A, a multi-disciplinary San Francisco design firm that has changed the way we think about work and workplace. Recently named Global Chair for Student Experience at the International Interior Design Association, Primo’s new focus is empowering the next generation of designers. In 2016, O+A won the Cooper Hewitt Design Award for Interior Design. In 2017, FRAME Publishers released a comprehensive retrospective of the firm’s work: “Studio O+A: Twelve True Tales of Workplace Design.”

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