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Tag Archives: Washington D.C.

Perkins + Will Blurs Work-Leisure Lines for Madison Marquette’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters

PROJECT NAME Madison Marquette
LOCATION Washington
FIRM Perkins + Will
SQ. FT. 17,800 SQF

Escorting several visitors through real-estate developer Madison Marquette’s new headquarters at the Wharf in Washington, D.C., chief development and asset management officer Peter Cole opens a closet door.

“Everybody squeeze in,” he commands. Inside is a counter with a white lacquered backsplash, which slides open seconds later to reveal a conference room. “In lengthy meetings, people wonder, Are we ever going to eat?” Cole explains. “Then they turn around and they’re like, Where did that buffet come from?”

In a corridor of the Madison Marquette headquarters, a storytelling wall slices up a photomural of the Wharf, one of the real-estate developer’s projects. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Two of the visitors, Perkins + Will design principal Ken Wilson and senior associate Haley Nelson, have seen the trick many times. They designed it, after all, to convey hospitality as a theme for a developer whose many mixed-use projects, including the 3.2-million-square-foot Wharf itself, purposefully blur the traditional lines between living, work, and leisure.

Bertjan Pot and Marcel Wander’s pendant fixture hangs above a Bassam Fellows sofa in the lounge. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Most of the 17,800-square-foot workplace operates on the show-don’t-tell principle, borrowing odd angles for phone rooms, embedding device chargers in terrazzo counters, and combining textures and finishes befitting a luxury hotel.

The company’s name appears hardly anywhere. The primary branding element is down a hallway leading to a conference area. On one side, a wall of glazing admits daylight and views of the Potomac River.

The storytelling wall’s fins are aluminum. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The eye is drawn, however, to the interior wall, where a series of 6-inch-wide, floor-to-ceiling aluminum fins—each imprinted with a slice of a photomural of the Wharf, rendered in bokeh effect—forms a lenticular installation: Approached from the right, the abstract image appears to be a daytime scene; from the left, it’s evening. Between the fins, a millwork display presents a photo series telling the company’s story through iconic projects from New Jersey to California.

Reception’s desk is backed by a lacquered logo wall, both custom. Photography by Eric Laignel.

“The images are held in place magnetically and can be switched out to reflect specific services,” Wilson says. Those include development, leasing, and management for 330 assets in 24 states and a $6.2 billion investment portfolio. Which means, Wilson says, that the most important design consideration was to create a space “that still looks good with boxes of pizza everywhere.”

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

Images of signature Madison Marquette projects are displayed between the fins. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Jeremy Pyles globe pendants illuminate the lounge’s custom terrazzo-topped island. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Claudia and Harry Washington lounge chairs stand near the communal walnut table in the café. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Ash-veneered storage and a custom quartz desktop define a collaborative work space. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Shared areas are separated from workstations and offices by a partition. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Millwork in the same veneer pairs with ceramic tile in a restroom. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Sources: From Top: Geiger: Chairs (Lounge). HBF Textiles: Chair Fabric. Vitra: Side Tables. Flos: Floor Lamp. Arzu Studio Hope: Rug. Moooi: Pendant Fixture. GSky: Plant Wall. Davis: Coffee Table (Lounge), Sofa (Café). Niche: Globe Pendant Fixtures (Lounge, Café). Herman Miller: Sofa, Barstools (Lounge), Dining Chairs (Café), Work-Stations, Task Chair, Stools (Office Area). Luum: Wall Covering (Reception, Office Area). 3M: Dichroic Film (Reception). Heath Ceramics: Backsplash (Lounge). Terrazzo & Marble Supply Companies: Island Solid-Surfacing. Kohler Co.: Sink, Sink Fittings. Restoration Hardware: Communal Table (Café). Bernhardt: Lounge Chairs, Wood Side Table. Maharam: Chair Fabric, Rug. Blu Dot: Coffee Table. Spinneybeck: Sofa Upholstery. Arktura: Ceiling Baffles. Formica: Custom Millwork (Office Area, Restroom). Transwall: Storefront System (Office Area). USG: Acoustical Ceiling Tile. McGrory Glass: Partition Markerboard. Clarus: Markerboard (Offices). Design Within Reach: Bench (Restroom). Electric Mirror: Mirror. Toto: Sink Fittings. Mockett: Cabinetry Hardware. American Standard: Toilet. Kohler Co.: Towel Bars. Crossville: Floor Tile. Architectural Ceramics: Wall Tile. Carnegie Fabrics: Wall Covering. Throughout: Focal Point: Recessed Fixtures. reSAWN Timber Co.: Wood Flooring. Shaw Contract Group: Carpet. Architectural Veneers International: Custom Veneer. DuPont: Solid-Surfacing. Benjamin Moore & Co.: Paint. Patricia Kazinski: Lighting Consultant. GHT Limited Consulting Engineers: MEP. Columbia Woodworking: Woodwork. James G. Davis Construction Corporation: General Contractor.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

The 9 Most Architecturally Significant Museum Openings This Fall

This fall, a number of cities around the world will celebrate the openings of major new museums—many of them with architecture as worthy of awe as the art itself. Some openings, like the Jean Nouvel–designed Louvre Abu Dhabi, will be seismic events for the architectural world. Others, like the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Jakarta, signal the maturation of their country’s flourishing arts scenes into subjects of international interest. From Cape Town’s Zeitz Museum—the first major museum in Africa devoted exclusively to contemporary art—to the Bible Museum in Washington, D.C., where visitors can roam a garden filled with plants referenced in the good book, the next few months will bring a bounty of new places to wander, learn, and find inspiration for years to come.

 

Museum of the Bible, Washington, D.C.

A few blocks from both the Capitol and the National Mall, the 430,0000-square foot Museum of the Bible (designed by SmithGroupJJR) plans to welcome its first crowds this November. The private museum is being funded by Hobby Lobby President Steve Green, who will also provide 40,000 artifacts from his collection, including papyrus fragments of the New Testament. Old Bibles and archives aren’t the only items on the docket, however; the museum is also slated to include immersive experiences like a biblical garden, where visitors can see what a hyssop bush or a rose of Sharon looks like before nibbling ancient snacks like flatbread and date honey in the café.

Louvre Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Long delayed, the Louvre Abu Dhabi is finally poised to open this fall. Designed by French Pritzker Prize–winner Jean Nouvel, the museum promises to be worth the wait: Part of the city’s Saadiyat Island cultural district, it will be capped by a star-latticed dome, dappling visitors with varied patterns of sunlight. The collection includes more than 600 artworks, manuscripts, and objects of historical and cultural significance, with more than 300 masterpieces on loan from French institutions.

Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MACAN), Jakarta, Indonesia

Indonesia’s first international modern art museum, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MACAN), will open this November, coinciding with the Jakarta Biennale. The 43,000-square-foot space, with interiors by MET Studio Design Ltd., is located in a mixed-use building and will feature the work of Indonesian artists like Raden Saleh and Affandi, as well as international stars like Ai Weiwei, Jeff Koons, and Gerhard Richter. For the inaugural exhibition, curators Charles Esche and Agung Hujatnika will present some 90 works from the collection of museum founder Haryanto Adikoesoemo.

Continue reading The 9 Most Architecturally Significant Museum Openings This Fall

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