Tag Archives: Tel Aviv

Design Is All About Connecting People, says Miguel McKelvey of WeWork

During an era of relentless and disruptive change, the key to success in business remains constant: find what works. Miguel McKelvey, the co-founder of billion-dollar startup WeWork (WEWORK, +0.00%) told the Brainstorm Design conference in Singapore that his company was born out of they typical entrepreneur’s vision of seeing a problem and trying to solve it.

Continue reading Design Is All About Connecting People, says Miguel McKelvey of WeWork

Advertisements

Tel Aviv’s Architectural Treasures Are Being Reborn Thanks to This Enterprising Duo

The cofounders of R2M—the city’s largest, cutting-edge hospitality group—are giving new life to Israel’s neglected landmarks.

Continue reading Tel Aviv’s Architectural Treasures Are Being Reborn Thanks to This Enterprising Duo

Tel Aviv’s Architectural Treasures Are Being Reborn Thanks to This Enterprising Duo

The cofounders of R2M—the city’s largest, cutting-edge hospitality group—are giving new life to Israel’s neglected landmarks.

Continue reading Tel Aviv’s Architectural Treasures Are Being Reborn Thanks to This Enterprising Duo

An Imaginative Kindergarten That Will Make Your Kids Love School

A new kindergarten and daycare complex was recently completed at the former Wholesale Market in Tel Aviv by Yashar Architects. Inside, the complex spans 3,000 square meters of innovative design, bursts of color, and playful vignettes to get the kids excited about school. Sarit Shani Hay was behind the inspiring design that had to house six kindergartens for kids aged 3-6 years, and three daycares for babies and toddlers from 3 months to 3 years.

The concept for the design began with the site’s history housing a produce market, hence the reoccurring use of colorful fruits and vegetables.

The kindergarten spaces received themes of fruits and veggies, market stalls, and delivery trucks, for imaginative play and learning.

Some of the custom-made furniture includes drawers for the kids and padded areas for the toddlers to lounge or read.

Photos by Dudi Moskovitz.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!

The Reason Why Tel Aviv Completed the World’s Tallest Lego Structure Just Might Surprise You

Any time a new world record is set, it’s an exciting moment in history. But the world record that was recently established in Tel Aviv was all the more touching for a surprising reason: It was completed in honor of Omer Sayag, an 8-year-old Israeli boy who passed away of cancer. Omer loved Legos. Which is why his teachers worked to bring a group of volunteers together to create a monument in his memory—the world’s tallest structure made of Legos. Located in Tel Aviv, the all-plastic structure soars 117 feet and 11 inches into the air. This makes it roughly 35 inches taller than the previous record set over a decade ago in Italy.

Continue reading The Reason Why Tel Aviv Completed the World’s Tallest Lego Structure Just Might Surprise You

These Designs Have Made the World a Much Better Place

Helping others through the healing creativity of art is priceless. Whether it’s creating a sense of community among those displaced by war or spreading awareness about an imminent issue in the form of a mural, design in 2017 cultivated humanity in a year of ups and downs. Below are eight standout architectural and design contributions that will continue to change the world far beyond this year.

Photo: Courtesy of HQ Architects

Harugei Malchut, Tel Aviv, Israel

Designed by HQ Architects, led by architect Erez Ella, Harugei Malchut in Tel Aviv is the urban renewal project that is changing the face of Israel by conforming to the construction and preservation policy known as TAMA 38. Created by upgrading existing buildings to comply with new building policies around natural disasters and political conflicts, Harugei Malchut is putting forth a model that will help citizens to live in a modern and safe building affordably.

Photo: Courtesy of Groundswell

Summer Studio 2017, Brooklyn, New York

In a beautiful collaboration between Groundswell, a Brooklyn community arts nonprofit, and Gensler’s internship program, a stunning mural centered around immigration was installed at PS 373 this past summer called, “Flight of Freedom.”

Kachumbala Maternity Ward, Kachumbala, Uganda

As a country with limited access to healthcare, Uganda was the perfect place to construct a maternity ward for local residents in the city of Kachumbala. Taking into account the lack of access to electricity and clean water, HKS Architects made sure the structure would not be inhibited by these factors, building in a purifying system for rainwater and relying completely on solar power.

 
Photo: Courtesy of The Wing

The Wing SoHo, New York

Dubbed the “home base for women,” The Wing, a female-only members club, opened its second location in New York’s SoHo neighborhood this year. The open working spaces, stunning color-coded library, and witty tile work cultivate creative energy for women to come together and change the world.

Photo: Courtesy of CASS Community Social Service

Cass Community Tiny Homes, Detroit

These beautiful tiny homes not only work to fight homelessness in Detroit but also provide a unique rent-to-own opportunity, giving tenants a second chance to create a new life for themselves.

Photo: Courtesy of Gensler / © Tom Harris 2017

Thomas Hughes Children’s Library, Chicago

Featuring a brand-new redesign led by Gensler, the Thomas Hughes Children’s Library focuses on providing local Chicago children and families with state-of-the-art learning facilities, focusing on igniting the curiosity within children, inviting learning naturally.

 
Photo: Courtesy of Ealing Council

Marston Court, London

Constructed using old shipping containers, Marston Court in the London borough of Ealing is a 34-unit housing complex created for emergency housing and fighting the homeless epidemic, designed by both the Ealing Council and QED Property.

Photo: Credit Yannick Wegner, Mannheim

Refugee Camp Community Center, Mannheim, Germany

A group of architecture students from the University of Kaiserslautern built a stunning community center for a refugee camp in Mannheim. Over the course of three months, the students worked with refugees to design and build the lattice-front structure, creating a common space for residents to build a natural sense of community.

For More Information About This Blog, Click Here!