Advertisements

Tag Archives: Tarkett

10 Things Not to Miss at NeoCon 2019

With more than 500 exhibitors from around the globe, NeoCon 2019(June 10-12) at Chicago’s theMART will present the newest and most innovative products and concepts in the commercial interior design industry, along with educational seminars and exciting events. Here are our picks for 10 things not to miss this year.

1. HiP Awards: Interior Design’s 6th annual HiP Awards ceremony, honoring industry people and innovative products, will take place Sunday, June 9 at 4:30pm at Marshall’s Landing in theMART—with a party to follow. Purchase tickets here.

2. The NeoCon Plaza: This outdoor space inspired by the idea of “The Urban Boardwalk” will debut this year at NeoCon as a new amenity for exhibitors and attendees. Spanning the length of the MART’s South Drive, NeoCon Plaza it’s designed as a collaborative gathering spot offering views of the Chicago River, Riverwalk and the city’s skyline. It will also be the site of product introductions and programming throughout NeoCon.

3. Material Bank Pop-up: Experience the design library of the future within this debut pop-up Material Bank showcase on the 1st floor of theMART. Suite 103.

4. Daily Keynotes: Gain insight into the ever-changing world of design at three keynotes in the NeoCon Theater: “The Familiar and Unusual: An Investigation of Balance and Experience in Design” by Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch, founders of New York-based Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors (June 10 at 8:00am); “Stuff Matters: The Material World We Make” by Ilse Crawford, creative director and founder of London-based Studioilse (June 11 at 8:00am); and “Do No Harm: The Role of Design in Complicated Times” by Liz Ogbu, founder and principal of New York-based Studio O (June 12 at 11:00am).

5. Living Products Showcase: Tickets ($10, register here) are still available for this Tour of NeoCon’s Healthy and Sustainable Products designed to meet the Living Product Challenge. It will be led by a guide from the International Living Future Institute from 2:30pm-4:00pm on June 11.

6. ID Live: Join Interior Design Editor in Chief Cindy Allen as she chats with designers during two sessions of ID Live on the Grand Staricase at theMART. At 1:00pm on June 10, Cindy will be joined by Heather Bush from Carnegie, Erwan Bouroullec from Skyline Design, and Patricia Urquiola from Haworth; at 1:30 her guests will be Don Chadwick from Humanscale, Ed Barber ad Jay Osgerby from Vitra, and Alain Gilles from BuzziSpace; and at 2:00pm, she will chat with Martin Lesjak and Asastaia Su from Mohawk Group, Guilherme Wentz from Sossego, Aliki van der Krujis from Wolf-Gordon, and Sebastian Salvado and Rios Clemente Hale from Janus et Cie. At 1:30pm on June 11, ID Live will feature Mary Holt and Chase Taylor from Carnegie, Nina Etnier and Brad Sherman of Float Studio for Tarkett, David Allan Pesso of JSI, Todd Heiser of Gensler and Byron Morton of theMART; at 2:00pm, Cindy’s guest will be Jessica Ahlerhing and Casey Keasler of Hightower along with several other designers.

7. The 7thFloor Exhibit Hall:  Visit to see new-to-NeoCon exhibitors that include Pedrali from Italy, Cascando from the Netherlands, and Luxxbox from Australia.

8. Interactive Activations: There will be plenty of installations and experiences to enjoy on every floor of theMART—from Herman Miller’s “All Together Now” (Floor 1, South Lobby) to Snowsound Quiet Zones (Floor 7, Pass-Through).

9. A Strong Hospitality Focus: In addition to two keynotes by executives from Roman & Williams and Studioilse—known for stellar hospitality projects around the globe—NeoCon 2019 will feature more than 300 exhibitors showing hospitality-minded products, among them Andreu World, Sossego Design, Arper, Bentley, and Sunbrella Contract.

10. SANDOW Innovation Lab: Stop by the first-ever SANDOW Innovation Lab to experience several compelling, industry-leading events in this multiuse space: lectures, roundtables, and product demonstrations.

> Check out Interior Design’s Annual Guide to NeoCon 2019

Continue reading 10 Things Not to Miss at NeoCon 2019

Advertisements

The ASID DESIGN IMPACT Awards

OVERVIEW OF DESIGN IMPACT AWARDS

The ASID Design Impact Awards Program recognizes innovative products that put people and/or the environment at the center of design intent.

The winning products will be featured by exhibitors at one or more of the following trade shows owned by Emerald Expositions:

Trade Show Award Submission Deadline
HD Expo, May 15 – 17, 2019 Wednesday, May 1, 2019  (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)
ICFF, May 19 – 22, 2019 Monday, May 6, 2019 (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)
GlobalShop, June 25 – 27, 2019 Monday, June 14, 2019 (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)
CEDIA Expo, September 10 – 14, 2019 Monday, August 26, 2019 (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)
Healthcare Design, November 2 – 5, 2019 Friday, October 18, 2019 (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)
BDNY, November 9 – 11, 2019 Friday, October 25, 2019 (All submissions must be complete by 11:59 p.m. ET)

 

Enter Your Product at HD Expo (Deadline 5/1) or ICFF (Deadline 5/6) Today!

Winners will be announced at the trade show in which the product is entered. The award winner will receive a certificate to display throughout that show and at other Emerald shows where the product will be featured within the calendar year.

At the end of the year (December 19, 2019), a press release will be issued announcing the overall winners from among all seven shows.

MEET THE WINNERS

Environments for Aging

Company: Tarkett
Product: The Garden Walk Collection

Tarkett believes in placing people in the center of every space, and designed the Garden Walk Collection for the human experience of the aging population, based on the evolving needs of this next generation. Using soft nuance and fluid movement, this warm array of color and pattern gently alludes to organic materials from the outdoor environment and embraces the imperfect beauty of the natural world. Each sophisticated design carries deep, soothing tones that create a tranquil atmosphere that lends itself to feelings of well-being for senior living spaces. Inviting, reflective, and restorative, these spaces are designed for the overall wellness of body, mind and soul.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

  • Product must currently be available in the marketplace and must be less than two years old.
  • Product must be on display in the exhibitor’s booth during the show for which the award was given.
  • Product must align to the awards intent and judging criteria used in determining award winners.
  • Products may only be entered in one of the above shows even if featured at multiple shows. The entrant may choose which show to enter the product.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

  • The product entry must be submitted in accordance with the timeline and deadlines set for that particular show. No extensions will be provided.
  • A product is not considered entered until a full application is submitted and payment has been accepted by ASID.
  • There is no limit to the number of products a company may enter into the competition, however, you may only enter a product once per calendar year at one of the above listed shows.
  • At the end of the calendar year, there will be a series of Best in Show winners declared from all products entered within the calendar year.
  • Entries will be judged by a panel of design luminaries, including interior design editors, according to the judging criteria.
  • Awards will be judged in consideration of a category but will not be awarded by category.
  • Products will be awarded based on their final score and there will be no limit to the number of awards given at each show.
  • The cost per product entry is $200.
  • Award winners will be announced on the first day of each tradeshow. E-mails with confirmation of the award will be sent to both the Company Applicant and Onsite Contact no later than noon on the same day.
  • All award winners will receive an awards certificate for public display in their booth on the first day of the show (certificates will be hand-delivered to the booth).
  • Award winners are encouraged to issue their own press release about their award; a template press release will be included in the e-mail announcing the award.
  • Award winners may display their winning certificate at other Emerald trade shows throughout the year. The product that won the award must be present in the booth when the certificate is displayed.
  • Duplicate award certificates for display at future shows or in company showrooms can be provided for an additional fee of $25 plus the full shipping/handling cost.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

WHAT’S UP WITH PINEAPPLES AND PALM MOTIFS?

posted on 05/07/2018 By Kadie Yale

While not overwhelming, particular palm motifs consistently poked their head out from around booths during this year’s HD Expo, mirroring the notifications we receive in the form of press releases: palm fronds, abstracted and repeating, have continued to be used in the industry, particularly in the hospitality market.

Updated to match current trends, the use of palms has a very direct relation to the historic use of pineapples in American design. But why does the now-somewhat-kitschy use of pineapples and other lush tropical vegetation continue to be prevalent in American design, and what does it mean for contemporary interiors?

Interestingly, pineapples are one of the design staples brought over to the colonies from England. The fruit is said to have been brought back to Europe during Christopher Columbus’ second voyage, and its many versions–from candied to jam–became a must-have in the upper echelons of society. However, access to raw and unprocessed pineapple was a luxury even those at the top of the class structure could hardly get ahold of.

Transporting the fruit in time meant it had to be shipped on the quickest boats in the fleet, and few were able to make it before turning. Therefore, it became a status symbol to be able to have the fresh fruit. Even King Charles II commissioned a portrait with a pineapple in-hand. While transportation became easier along the North American seaboard as the colonies expanded, pineapples were still a costly commodity; they quickly became a preferred high-society hostess gift, thereby cementing its on-going legacy as a symbol of hospitality.

While pineapple motifs are still used, they somewhat lost their luster in the mid-20th century when technology and materiality allowed them to be incorporated into the growing middle class through goods like wallpaper and clothing textiles. The fruit took off in popular culture, due heavily to Hawai’i becoming a state on August 21, 1959. In the same ways that America saw Egyptian motifs in the 1920s after the discovery of King Tut or Japanese-influenced design in the mid-19th century, the welcoming of Hawai’i to the United States became exoticized.

A LONG HISTORY OF PINEAPPLE MOTIFS

Today, information can be easily found on the history of pineapple motifs in interior design, but for the most part, their use has continued more often because of the mid-20th-century inspiration. Ask an interior designer why they’ve chosen to use tropical foliage or a manufacturer why it’s entered their line, and the answers are typically in response to the fun aesthetic and relaxing aura pineapple and palms give off.

It’s an easy connection to say that pineapple icons evolved into the use of other tropical plants in decor, but I believe we can take it one step further to interweave the current importance of health and wellness into the reemergence of tropical prints.

As clients and end-users become more familiar with biomimicry and biophilic design, interior designers are searching for ways to bring nature indoors. With nature-inspired design on the rise, florals were reintroduced into interiors, but while pineapples mostly harken back to images of a 50’s father in a Hawaiian t-shirt next to the grill in a newly-developed suburb, florals have a tradition of easily crossing the line into appearing matronly (most likely due to gender bias, but that topic deserves its own article). Companies such as Tarkett have been able to release floral products in recent years, but they come alongside more abstracted designs to tone down the flower patterns.

PALM MOTIFS & FLOWERS

Working with flowers, and working with flowers well is a special skill few possess.

Tropical motifs, however, haven’t had the same type of gender bias that flowers have. The historical tie-in to hospitality may not be as direct as it was in the past, but the image of palms, pineapples, and birds of paradise still inspire the feeling of luxury, relaxation, and getting away from it all. Eliciting these emotions while also pulling in biophilic design principals packages the whole aesthetic into the perfect “Wish you were here!” statement.

Two notable instances during the HD Expo show were the use of more mid-century design and repeat by Innovations, and an abstracted block-print-like design by Fil Doux. In particular, these two examples show the main ways in which interior designers are using tropical greenery: in traditional, realistic ways (Innovations), or by breaking down the pattern to only its geometric elements (Fil Doux).

Designers can expect to continue to see pineapples, palms, and more tropically-integrated products in the coming years. While they may not take center-stage or be the highlight of the collection, they will continue to emerge.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

%d bloggers like this: