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40 Of The Best Coronavirus Related Pieces Of Street Art

Have you learned any new talents while being stuck in quarantine? How about some languages? Don’t worry if the answer is “no” – you still have plenty of time to do that as it looks like the quarantine won’t be lifted anytime soon. But while you and I are stuck at home learning Spanish on Duolingo, some artists are still out there creating amazing street art.

Graffiti artists all over the world are creating coronavirus related street art their art pieces are as accurate as they are funny. Check them out in the gallery below!

#1 Copenhagen, Denmark. Artist: Welinoo

Image source: welinoo

#2 Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Artist: Fake

Image source: iamfake

Fake says to have painted this “Super Nurse” as an ode to all healthcare professionals around the world.

#3 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Teachr1

Image source: teachr1

#4 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#5 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

“Divided We Stand, United We Fall.”

#6 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ponywave

Image source: ponywave

From the artist’s Instagram:
“We all are going through this together. There is a reason which we will see after all. It’s time to look at ourselves. Take a look at what are we doing with the planet and our lifetime. Maybe we should change our priorities? Maybe we should slow down? Maybe we should take a look around and start respect our planet and all those with whom we share it? Maybe someone is trying to hide some changes? Or economic collapse? Maybe one more step to a new world order?”

#7 Pompei, Italy. Artist: Nello Petrucci

Image source: nellopetrucciartist

#8 Berlin, Germany. Artist: EME Freethinker

Image source: Bobone2121

#9 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Artist: Aira Ocrespo

Translation from Portuguese: “Bolsonaro’s mask against the Coronavirus.”

#10 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#11 Malmö, Sweden. Artist: Richard Juggins

Image source: Richard Juggins

#12 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Rasmus Balstrøm

Image source: balstroem

Balstrøm who is originally from Denmark did this last mural before he had to flee the country.

#13 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Corie Mattie

Image source: coriemattie

#14 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#15 Miami, USA. Artist: Sean “Hula” Yoro

Image source: the_hula

#16 London, UK. Artist: Pegaus

Image source: ojc9

#17 Jindbayne, Australia. Artist: N/A

Image source: EditedThisWay

#18 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angus

Image source: angusart85

#19 Bryne, Norway. Artist: Pøbel

Image source: pobel.no

“In these challenging times, I hope this piece can be a positive contribution and spread some joy. Be safe and take care of one another.”

#20 Mumbai, India. Artist: Tyler Street Art

Image source: tylerstreetart

“Keep calm”

#21 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#22 Melbourne, Australia. Artist: Lush Sux

Translation from Chinese – “Nothing to see, carry on.”

Image source: lushsux

#23 Tartu, Estonia. Artist: Princess Täna

Image source: princess_t2na

“Living in a bubble. Just to be more ironic, a soap bubble.”

#24 Warsaw, Poland

Image source: cdn.natemat.pl

Translates to: Not every hero wears a cape. Thank you! (Translation credit: Draco Malfoy)

#25 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#26 New York, USA. Artist: Crkshnk

Image source: crkshnk

#27 United Kingdom. Artist: Gnasher

Image source: gnashermurals

#28 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#29 New York, USA. Artist: Jason Naylor

Image source: jasonnaylor

#30 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: Jilly Ballistic

#31 London, UK. Artist: N/A

Image source: Hookedblog

#32 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jeremy Novy

Image source: jeremynovy

#33 Dublin, Ireland. Artist: Subset Collective

Image source: subset

#34 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: jillyballistic

#35 Copenhagen. Denmark. Artist: Andreas Welin

Image source: Welinoo

“a-a-Achoooo!”

#36 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angusart85

Image source: angusart85

#37 London, UK. Artist: Lionel Stanhope

Image source: lionel_stanhope

#38Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jules Muck

Image source: muckrock

#39 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ruben Rojas

Image source: rubenrojas

#40 Bristol, UK. Artist: Diff

Image source: diff_artist

Aušrys Uptas

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post,Click Here! 

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45 Mind-Bending Photos You Won’t Believe Aren’t Photoshopped

Photoshop is an amazing tool that can help you turn even the most mediocre photos into masterpieces. You can do almost anything you want – fix the lighting, adjust the colors, apply a filter – the possibilities are endless! However, there are times where you actually take a picture that’s so incredible, people have a hard time believing it’s not photoshopped.

Be it skill or pure luck, sometimes we end up capturing shots that look almost too amazing to be real. People are sharing their stunning photos online and you’ll have a hard time believing there was no Photoshop involved. Clever angles, perfect timing, a little creativity and a dash of luck – check out the incredible photos you won’t believe aren’t photoshopped in the gallery below!

#1 My Friend Just Got This Once In A Lifetime Picture

Image source: nimo4749

#2 Landscape Perfectly Divided By The Rails Of A Fence

Image source: youcancallmealsdkf

#3 The Water Also Looks Like An Elephant

Image source: RailTieYardGame

#4 The Golden Rays Of The Sunset Entered The Cave At Just The Right Angle To Light Up This Section Of Ice, Making It Look Like Amber

Image source: sarah.bethea

#5 A Forest Service Worker Photographed A Fire Burning Inside A Tree While He’s Fighting Western N.C. Wildfires

Image source: Grown_Man_Poops

#6 This Spot On I-80 In Wyoming Is Known As The Highway To Heaven

#7 My Boy Climbing An Old Rotten Tree Stump Looks Like A Giant Climbing Mountains

Image source: AidenAsh15

#8 Halfway Sunset

Image source: lazzyyness

#9 The Pole In This Picture Makes It Look Like Two Different Pictures

Image source: morphdarko

#10 Perfect Timing

Image source: Mannos_Hands_of_Fate

#11 This Window That Makes My Back Yard Look Like It’s In 4 Different Seasons

Image source: pommiegurl130

#12 These Burnout Marks Look 3D

Image source: Zevyn

#13 The Dog Is Covered With Holi Powder, Looks Like He’s On Fire

Image source: the_malociraptor

#14 Rosie Caught The Sunlight Just Right. She Was Sitting At The Curb Edge With The Sun Setting Just Under The Car. One Hell Of A Cool Effect

Image source: Itsmeerl

#15 This Black Car Looks Like A Mirror After Being Washed

Image source: Tittzo

#16 The Black-And-White Costume Was The Best One I Have Ever Seen. No Masking… Honest

Image source: Andy Thomas

#17 These Teacups Look Like They Have Little Holes In Them

Image source: UncannyDonuts

#18 Me And My Girlfriend Were Walking In The Woods The Other Week And Saw A Rainbow Pool For The First Time

Image source: brentenross

#19 This Cow Eating Grass

Image source: sixfeetunder98

#20 World’s Tallest Tram

Image source: SuperCub

#21 My Drive In To Work This Morning (I-90 In The Berkshire Mountains, MA)

Image source: the-crooked-compass

#22 In Cute Cat News, My Mom Put Up An Easter Decal On Our Front Door And It Makes Gigi Look Like A Dr. Seuss Character

Image source: drewsoulman

#23 6 Years Ago I Posted My Wife’s Eye That Her Doctor Told Her Was The Weirdest He’d Ever Seen. Since Then My Photography’s Improved Quite A Bit, So Here’s A New Pic I Took A Couple Days Ago

Image source: AlwaysSpinClockwise

#24 This Photo From Inside A Tent Looks Like Photoshop Trick

Image source: Ingelo8Jean

#25 This Falling Clock That Took The Wall With It

Image source: i_was_a_lemur_once

#26 This Viaduct In South England, UK

Image source: naypenrai

#27 Perfectly Timed

Image source: McVoax

#28 The Frost On The Fence This Morning

Image source: trevorche

#29 This Photographer Was Probably Excited

#30 Russia Hasn’t Got Anything On The Monterrey Stadium In Mexico

Image source: beachdogs

#31 The Way My Closet Separates This Light

Image source: weepysplash

#32 This Unicorn Picture Is Different In The Mirror

Image source: scsilly

#33 Very Clear Water In Sweden

Image source: Suborb

#34 The Rain Turned Our Yard Into A Van Gogh Painting

Image source: ericb303

#35 We Recently Had A Storm In Germany

Image source: mybliss

#36 Wasp On The Water Surface

Image source: solem specto

#37 The Paint On This Building Is The Same Shade As The Sky

Image source: pachew96

#38 Hundreds Of Thousands Of Starlings Migrating Across The Region Covered The Skies Of Rome Making It Appear Like TV Static

Image source: MrRubberBurner

#39 The Way My Cup Broke

Image source: cotton-swabs

#40 Levitating Horse

Image source: ConsciousCamel

#41 This Photo I Took Of Fog Over A Lake Makes This Warning Sign Look Like It Is Surrounded By Nothingness

Image source: N_O_A_H

#42 Standing In A Huge Pond That Sinks Every Dry Season

Image source: bradyboh

#43 The Reflection Of The Light On My Coffee Looks Like A Glowing Castle

Image source: MadnessDreamer

#44 Waterfowl Lake In Banff National Park, Alberta / Canada

Image source: ANJCI ALL OVER

#45 Simple Yet Creative

Image source: corne1ius

Continue reading 45 Mind-Bending Photos You Won’t Believe Aren’t Photoshopped

30 Country Flags Reimagined As Anime Characters For 2020 Tokyo Olympics

By now, you’ve probably already heard that Tokyo will be hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics. To celebrate this upcoming event, a handful of Japanese artists decided to team up and reimagine some of the participating countries as badass warriors.

The artists took inspiration from each countries’ flags and history while giving all of them a unique twist. From Japan itself to South Africa, check out the countries reimagined as anime warriors in the gallery below!

More info: world-flags.org | Twitter

#1 Philippines

Image source: world flags

#2 Mexico

Image source: world flags

#3 UK

Image source: world flags

#4 Vietnam

Image source: world flags

#5 South Korea

Image source: world flags

#6 Japan

Image source: world flags

#7 China

Image source: world flags

#8 South Africa

Image source: world flags

#9 Sweden

Image source: world flags

#10 Malaysia

Image source: world flags

#11 Italy

Image source: world flags

#12 Finland

Image source: world flags

#13 Canada

Image source: world flags

#14 Belgium

Image source: world flags

#15 Spain

Image source: world flags

#16 France

Image source: world flags

#17 Switzerland

Image source: world flags

#18 Germany

Image source: world flags

#19 Argentina

Image source: world flags

#20 Norway

Image source: world flags

#21 Singapore

Image source: world flags

#22 Thailand

Image source: world flags

#23 Brazil

Image source: world flags

#24 India

Image source: world flags

#25 Indonesia

Image source: world flags

#26 Netherlands

Image source: world flags

#27 Venesuela

Image source: world flags

#28 Denmark

Image source: world flags

#29 Russia

Image source: world flags

#30 USA

Image source: world flags

Continue reading 30 Country Flags Reimagined As Anime Characters For 2020 Tokyo Olympics

50 Of The Most Evil-Looking Buildings In The World

 

As famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright expressed, the environment and architecture should organically blend into each other. But the designs you’re about to see could only blend into the dark pages of a supervillain comic.

Bored Panda has compiled a list of these impressive architectural marvels that have this sinister look about them, immediately giving us associations with the headquarters of some evil organization like Virtucon from Austin Powers movies.

Did we miss some? Then share more diabolical designs in the comments!

#1 Buzludzha, Bulgaria

Image source: Nikon Morris

#2 Philadelphia City Hall, Philadelphia, USA

Image source: James Losey

#3 Mahanakhon Tower, Bangkok, Thailand

Image source: Jackrit Singhanutta

#4 Polygone Riviera, France

Image source: polygone-riviera.fr

#5 Riverside Museum, Glasgow, UK

Image source: Targn Pleiades

#6 Catholic Church, Paks, Hungary

Image source:  Sitkei Gábor

#7 Former Research Institute For Experimental Medicine, Berlin, Germany

Image source: Barrie Leach

#8 Bahnhof Office Built Into A Former Anti-Atomic Shelter, Stockholm, Sweden

Image source: Albert France-Lanord (A)rchitects

#9 Maison St Cyr, Brussels, Belgium

Image source: Andrew Peter Martin

#10 Fort Alexander (Plague Fort), Saint Petersburg, Russia

Image source: flappytowel

#11 Dc Tower I, Vienna, Austria

Image source: imgur.com

#12 Clermont-Ferrand Cathedral, Clermont-Ferrand, France

Image source: commons.wikimedia.org

#13 The National Library Of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus

Image source: acornsoftware

#14 Hallgrímskirkja, Reykjavík, Iceland

Image source: Daniel Williams

#15 Expiatori Del Sagrat Cor, Mount Tibidabo, Barcelona, Spain

Image source: amoschapplephoto

#16 Temppeliaukion Church, Helsinki, Finland

Image source: kosmologi

#17 The Maze Tower, Dubai, UAE

Image source: citymetric.com

#18 Oakley Headquarters, Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest, USA

Image source: Ed McGowan

#19 Basque Health Department Headquarters In Bilbao, Spain

Image source: ALEIX BAGUÉ

#20 Aiguille Du Midi, French Alps

Image source: Frank Mulliez

#21 Ferrari World, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Image source: AndersenFC

#22 Ryugyong Hotel, Pyongyang, North Korea

Image source: Roman Harak

#23 Taipei 101 Observatory, Taipei City, Taiwan

Image source: PC_Junkie

#24 Ostankino Broadcast Tower, Moscow, Russia

Image source: Denis Murin

#25 Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo, Japan

Image source: Sandro Bisaro

#26 Wedding Palace, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan

Image source: Dan Lundberg

#27 Pacific Design Center, Red Building, Hollywood, California, USA

Image source: Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

#28 The Bank Of America Center, Houston, USA

Image source: Mabry Campbell Follow

#29 Al Tijaria Tower, Kuwait City, Kuwait

Image source: usabin

#30 Cologne Central Mosque, Cologne, Germany

Image source: chanelmuslim.com

#31 Stamp House, Queensland, Australia

Image source: Charles Wright Architects

#32 Space Museum, Vancouver, Canada

Image source: Janusz Leszczynski

#33 Chongqing Art Museum, Chongqing Shi, China

Image source: Thomas

#34 Omv Borealis Refinery, On The German/Austrian Frontier

Image source: Ian Allen

#35 Science And Technology Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea

Image source: Reuters

#36 Kafka Castle, Sant Pere De Ribes, Barcelona, Spain

Image source: archdaily

#37 Svalbard Global Seed Vault (Seed Bank), Spitsbergen, Norway

Image source: Global Crop Diversity Trust

#38 Ilinden, Krushevo, Macedonia

Image source: jan kempenaers

#39 The United States Air Force Academy, Colorado, USA

Image source: Dave Soldano

#40 At&t Building, Nashville, Tennessee, Usa

Image source: imgur

#41 The Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain

Image source: Carlos Vieira Follow

#42 Selfridges Department Store, Birmingham, England

Image source: devonvisitor

#43 Jimbocho Theater, Tokyo, Japan

Image source: Nikken Sekkei

#44 Graz Art Museum, Graz, Austria

Image source: Teillu

#45 Mcdonald’s, Roswell, New Mexico, USA

Image source: imgur

#46 Geisel Library, La Jolla, California, USA

Image source: O Palsson

#47 Reiyukai Shakaden Temple, Tokyo, Japan

Image source: L. Felipe Castro

#48 College Life Insurance Company Headquarters, Indianapolis, USA

Image source: Jimmy Baikovicius

#49 Rio De Janeiro Cathedral, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Image source: Cyro A. Silva

#50 Church Of St. Giovanni Bono, Milan, Italy

Image source: Il Conte Photography

Continue reading 50 Of The Most Evil-Looking Buildings In The World

Human-centered design is the secret sauce for open-plan success

Michael J. Berens

Wednesday, June 05, 2019

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Human-centered design is the secret sauce for open-plan success

Open-plan workspaces have been given quite a thrashing in recent years. The more ubiquitous they become, the more employees and critics complain about how awful they are to work in. Pull back the curtain on the controversy, though, and what you find is that some open-plan spaces do function better than others.

What makes the difference? Designers will not be surprised to learn that, according to recent research, the major factor is the quality of the interior design.

Drawing on what is now an extensive body of research, most workspaces now are designed to promote certain kinds of employee behaviors found to be linked to important business goals, such as more rapid innovation and increased productivity.

Yet, some studies have shown that even with this evidence-based approach these environments do not always produce the intended results. In some cases, post-occupancy evaluations have found performance actually declined after employees were moved from more traditional to so-called high-performance open-plan spaces.

As reported in the most recent issue of the journal Buildings, a team of Australian researchers, led by Christhina Candido of the Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning at the University of Sydney, reviewed a database of research studies on employee dissatisfaction in open-plan environments and noticed they tended to treat them all as the same without giving attention to the individual physical configuration and conditions of each space. They wondered whether differences in the interior design features of the space would affect the level of employee dissatisfaction differently.

To dig deeper, the researchers conducted post-occupancy surveys of employees in 61 offices in Australia, resulting in a dataset of 8,827 responses. The survey questionnaire was designed to gather employee perceptions of their work environment as it pertained to productivity, health and comfort. In addition to the survey data, which included in-depth analysis of 18 high-performance work environments, the researchers also conducted site visits of each office and collected floor plans and fit-out specific information.

What the researchers found was that across all three areas of inquiry interior design elements ranked among the top factors affecting whether employees were satisfied or not with their working conditions. Work area aesthetics, comfort of furnishings, and the degree of freedom to adapt and personalize one’s usual work area were key drivers of worker satisfaction in both regular and high-performance open-plan environments.

Spatial comfort was another key consideration. Employees in work environments that provided various zones for different types of activities — collaboration, individual work, socialization — had overall higher levels of satisfaction.

This finding correlates with the results of investigations presented in a recent Steelcase report, “New Work. New Rules.” The authors contend that most offices are still designed for linear work and don’t enable the workflow, activities and behaviors required for today’s “hyper-collaborative” work environment. The best workplaces, they find, support the activities of the team while nurturing the needs of individuals.

As with the Australian study, the Steelcase researchers found that employees feel a lack of control over their environment and want more freedom to adapt their work area to fit various types of activities they engage in throughout their day.

Similarly, a review of research on both individual and group perceptions of their office design experience, conducted by Christina Bodin Danielsson of the School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, concludes that personal control is a key factor for high employee satisfaction and can be addressed through a number of design solutions. Danielsson argues that office design needs to be more holistic, taking into account the combined contextual effect of the physical characteristics of the environment and the functional feature of office work.

What all three studies share is a decided emphasis on the critical component of human-centered design. For open-plan and high-performance spaces to succeed, these studies indicate, they must support the kinds and varieties of activities that today’s workers are engaged in.

Moreover, they must respond to employee’s basic needs for comfort, control and wellness. When employees feel good about their work environment, then they deliver the results businesses are expecting. That places proper interior design at the top of the priority list as a “must-have” not just a “nice-to-have.”

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About the Author

Michael J. Berens

Michael J. Berens is a freelance researcher and writer with more than 30 years of experience in association communication and management. He can be reached at mjberensresearch@gmail.com.

Continue reading Human-centered design is the secret sauce for open-plan success

Hygge Was Heartwarming, But This Year Is All About Intentional Lagom Living

Home inspiration for 2018 is all about Sweden’s simple style and stunning symmetry.

In 2017, it seemed you couldn’t turn around without seeing the cozy Danish sensation “hygge” (pronounced, hue-guheverywhere: Pinterest, Instagram, coffee table books, and articles upon articles on how to bring that inviting feeling home. And while our love for hygge, still thrives, at the start of a new year a new Scandinavian sentiment is gaining ground as the latest lifestyle liking: “lagom” ( laaaw-gum). While hygge encompasses warm feelings of comfort, contentment, and togetherness, Swedish lagom is more about the virtue of intentional moderation and balance; not too much, not too little, but “just right.”

In a culture of extremes where excessive work, connectivity on social media, and just plain stuff, as well as serious self-restriction with diet detoxes and closet purges, lagom is a relief and respite. The complex word translates to all areas of Swedish life. But when it comes to interiors, a lagom room is decorated with carefully selected, personalized decor and will exude a balance of comfort and utility in a neutral, calm peaceful color scheme—very IKEA if you ask me. 

As 2018 commences, we’re totally on board with the “less is more” mantra. If you want to bring a sense of lagom home, we’ve found gorgeous Scandinavian rooms that are giving us major #decorgoals. And, we’re gathering plenty more inspiration on Pinterest! 

 

We’re dreaming of dinner parties…

Simple mid-century pieces paired with personal and natural elements seems to be a pretty standard lagom combination. Industrial, utilitarian lighting and seating, but in a unique array of soft colors, as well as natural greenery, warm rug and an art gallery wall that expresses your unique taste looks inviting and gives character. 

Shop the look!

 We could stay in this bed all day.

Calm, peaceful, unplugged—this neutral, cool-toned bedroom still manages to look cozy with soft linen bedding and a warm wool throw blanket with side table greenery. Add a few candle lanterns for an extra dose of snug! 

Shop the look!

 Find us in the lived-in living room.

This is living room is definitely a “just right” balance of functionality and style. Clean mid-century seating and lighting in simple shapes with unique lines combined with plush textured rugs and pillows in natural textiles creates a pleasing atmosphere. Keep the things you love and use most but display them intentionally; think pretty coffee table books, vintage cameras, glassware, trinkets and more. 

Shop the look!

Treat yourself to a lagom kitchen. 

You can really see the balanced, beautiful utilitarian lagom theme in a kitchen. Fill exposed shelves with items you use every day, but also makes you happy to look at every day. Put your pretty kitchenware on display with thoughtful spacing and bring in warmth and life with natural wood cutting boards and bronze candlesticks as well as pretty potted herbs.

Shop the look!

Continue reading Hygge Was Heartwarming, But This Year Is All About Intentional Lagom Living

SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN VS. MINIMALIST DESIGN: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Navigating design terms can be as confusing as assembling a home entertainment system by hand. But to plan interior design that suits your highly specific, oh-so-original tastes and home, you need the language to talk about the nuances of certain styles.

If all you know about minimalist and Scandinavian design is that IKEA sells a lot of it, let us hand you the metaphorical power drill. Here’s everything you need to know about the two aesthetics.

Continue reading SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN VS. MINIMALIST DESIGN: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

INTERIOR DESIGN SLANG FROM AROUND THE WORLD

When you walk into a room with exceptional design, you’re probably at a loss for words. Good aesthetics seem to transcend language — after all, the appropriate response to statement wallpaper or the perfect velvet sofa is *gasp*.

But when you do get down to talking good interiors, you need to know the lingo, otherwise it can be hard to keep up. We’ve already broken down the basics for you — from elevated to contrived patina — and now we’ve rounded up a few examples of design slang from around the world to keep on your radar.

Broaden your vocab and decorating horizons below.

interior-design-slang-01-1508532360

South Africa: ‘Partial Story’

If you know what a mezzanine is, then you’ve seen a partial story. “It’s an additional level in an area that does not cover more than a quarter of the space (give or take), creating a double-height effect,” says Janine Saal, an interior designer at Collaboration in Cape Town. “It’s a great addition to any home that wants to add more functionality to a large, cavernous space but maintain the natural light and openness, while cutting the costs of adding a second floor.

Sweden: ‘Trasmatta’

“Look around a Swedish home (particularly a rural dwelling) and you’re more than likely to come across a trasmatta, or rag rug,” writes Niki Brantmark, the author of Lagom (Not Too Little, Not Too Much): The Swedish Art of Living a Balanced, Happy Life. “This traditional rug is usually handmade on a loom from scraps of worn-out clothes and old rags. You can easily find a trasmatta in the shops, but why not give your old textiles a new lease of life and create your own?”

interior-design-slang-02-1508532591.jpg

France: ‘Chiner’

“The rule I follow when decorating is chiner, which means looking in many second hand shops to find the perfect pieces,” says French illustrator Alice Wietzel. “What’s important to me is to decorate in a sustainable and ecological way, and chiner — reusing and reinventing a purpose for elements of decoration — is part of that process.”

Philippines: ‘Ventanilla’

Considering the Philippines gets incredibly hot and humid, houses tend to have large windows to let air in. “You don’t want to keep big windows open all night, so traditionally houses have other ways of letting in air, like these small screened slots below windows,” says Filipino interior designer and blogger Jennifer Cederstam. “Basically, if it’s not a window but it lets in air, it’s a vetanilla.”

interior-design-slang-03-1508535706

United States: ‘Decorina

“We love the word decorina, which could be used like: ‘I see the decorina has been busy today.’ A decorator pet word, if you will,” says Miles Redd.

So, go on global decorinas and prosper!

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