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Tag Archives: South Carolina

Are You Crazy to Open a Brick-and-Mortar Shop?

Why would a designer decide to open a brick-and-mortar design shop selling product, given the nonstop chatter of a retail apocalypse? Is an online operation less complicated, or does e-commerce just present a different set of challenges? AD PRO asked four designers who currently have, or have had, shops of the brick-and-mortar or online variety to weigh in on their experiences, so you can make an informed decision.

“I am tactile. And I also strongly feel that design is about discovery,” designer Sarah Hamlin Hastings, owner of Fritz Porter Design Collective in Charleston, South Carolina, explains about the benefit of a brick-and-mortar versus an online-only shop. “The internet is great if you know what you are looking for. But what about the sense of discovery when perusing a quirky little antique shop or running your hands over a sumptuous new mohair or finding a woodworker who makes beautifully designed pieces in his garage workshop? That is the curated shopping experience I wanted to create.”

After moving to Charleston in 2010 only to discover a lack of nearby design resources, Hastings decided to launch her own hybrid business—a curated retail store, a textile showroom, and an interior design business—which opened in 2015. And while she felt the personal and financial risk of opening a successful brick-and-mortar store was higher than an online-only business (as far as investing in inventory, overhead costs, and dealing with slim profit margins when working with independent artisan vendors), she found great gratification in seeking out interesting pieces and being able to tell artisans’ stories and promote their craft.

Fritz Porter
Fritz Porter, Sarah Hamlin Hastings’s Charleston shop.

Julia Lynn

Similarly, interior designer Paloma Contreras, co-owner of Houston-based Paloma & Co., launched the brick-and-mortar concept store this year with business partner Devon Liedtke (the store also has a strong online component). The aim was to “showcase unique items that tell a story—whether they are antiques or found objects, original art from emerging American artists, or handmade pieces by artisans from around the globe.”

“It is really nice to be able to showcase our style and point of view without any type of filter,” Contreras says. “We don’t want to offer things that are available at a dozen stores in town or hundreds of stores online. For us, the most important thing has been finding things to offer our customers that are not only signature to our style, but also have an interesting story to tell.”

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In the same vein as Hastings and Contreras, interior designer and author Kirsten Grove of Boise, Idaho–based We Three Design Studio and design blog Simply Grove, says, “When you’re a designer, you’re a natural curator. Having a shop of your own allows you to curate items that you really do believe in and find beautiful. It’s an easy partnership when done right and in the right market.”

Devon Liedtke and Paloma Contreras
Devon Liedtke and Paloma Contreras’s Houston shop, Paloma & Co.

Kerry Kirk

However, for Grove the challenges of running her own design shop ultimately took their toll on her design business, and she folded it in 2018 after just one year in operation. “I had always wanted to own my own shop that sold furniture and home goods. It was one of those things that I had to get out of my system,” she admits. “But there were a few tricky aspects, one being that Boise is a really hard place to have a successful home retail shop. It was hard to gain regular customers who weren’t just looking for sale items.”

In general Grove sees pluses and minuses to both brick-and-mortar and online shops. “A brick-and-mortar space allows your clients and customers to see and feel things in person, while having an online shop gets rid of the unexpected overhead costs,” she explains. “But a huge drawback for an online shop is shipping costs and angry customers who have received something damaged or an incorrect order.” But she adds, “If you’re able to create a team that only focuses on your shop, it’s totally doable!”

Michelle Adams, the former Domino magazine editor who ran online shop The Maryn for two and a half years, during which time she hosted four pop-ups, found that it’s a misconception to believe that an e-commerce business doesn’t require as many overhead costs. Her expenses turned out to be too high to make her business viable.

“Opening a shop represented the ultimate creative outlet for me, as it required editing the market for the coolest products, creating a brand identity, and developing the lifestyle imagery to support it,” Adams says. However, the cost of running a design shop included expenses that one might not think of up front, including employing a full team to help with order fulfillment, the website, customer service, accounting, photography, and so on. Then there were also warehouse costs, high-interest business loan payments, press outreach, marketing fees, and insurance. Additionally, Adams curated her product selections from artisans around the globe to keep her assortment fresh and unique. “But importing comes with a lot of hidden costs that eat away profit margins,” she says. Another financial burden was her inability as a small business owner to compete with the free shipping offered by larger e-commerce sites.

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The Maryn
Product from The Maryn, Michelle Adams’s online shop, which ceased operations this spring. Adams is former editor in chief of Domino and cofounder of Lonny.

Marta X. Perez

Once the financial challenges became too great, Adams decided to close up shop. Based on what she learned, she advises, “Be realistic about what you’re comfortable spending, and absolutely stick to it. I made the mistake of thinking that investing a little more here and there would help my shop get over a hump, but in the end it only put me into debt.”

Likewise, Grove urges, “Before you do anything, run your numbers and be very honest with yourself. If you don’t create a cushion for the first three months, things can get tricky.” Yet, she adds, “An online shop can be time-sucking but worth the work. And a brick-and-mortar can become a beautiful extension of your brand.”

Read More

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AMERICAN BARNS ARE BEING PILLAGED BY THIEVES WITH A TASTE FOR RUSTIC CHIC

Barns are under siege. The theft of weathered timber planks has been reported around the US from Montana to South Carolina.

The phenomenon is especially pronounced in one state. ”Kentucky is a veritable hotbed of barnwood purloining,” the Associated Press reports.

Just as thieves strip copper wiring and tubing from abandoned buildings and catalytic converters from cars to harvest the palladium, they’re cruising the countryside with hammers and crowbars, keeping an eye out for barns to pillage. Depending on the condition and color of the planks, wholesalers will pay up to $2 a board foot, the AP said. Authentically worn barn doors also fetch a premium.

Local sheriffs believe that a new demand for reclaimed lumber is driving the crime spree. Rustic chic, a look that favorites open-floor plans, farmhouse sinks, and tastefully rusted antique planters overflowing with greenery, often incorporates weathered wood on floors and walls, in soft, earthy shades of brown and gray. In one episode of Fixer Upper, the immensely popular HGTV show, Chip and Joanna Gaines convert an actual barn into a home, with many of the interior walls clad in barn boards. One of Joanna Gaines’ signature looks as an interior designer is to hang a vintage barn door on a sliding rail system, as a room divider.

The rough-hewn, mason-jar-full-of-wildflowers look has also driven a trend of barn weddings, invoking the long history of barn dances and rural community gatherings—and inspiring some barn owners to jump into the event industry.

Despite what your Instagram account might show, even as their rough-hewn aesthetic proliferates, barns are disappearing from the American landscape. “There are all kinds of obvious threats to barns—weather, fire, age—but the biggest is not having a purpose,” Kelly Rundle, director of the documentary The Barn Raisers told City Lab. The National Barn Alliance estimates that there are close to 1.5 million barns on farms in the US, a far cry from the more than seven million believed to have existed in 1935. Many now are in serious states of disrepair.

This is not the first time enterprising thieves have plundered rural barns.

“In the case of Old Homestead Farm, which is owned by Dennis and Elaine Thomas, the police said the thieves might have used climbing gear to scale the barn, remove the horse-shaped weather vane and replace it with a duplicate,” The New York Times reported in 2006, about antique. weathervane thefts around New England. “I just screamed, ‘That’s not our horse,’ ” Ms. Thomas said. “I knew instantly.”

Continue reading AMERICAN BARNS ARE BEING PILLAGED BY THIEVES WITH A TASTE FOR RUSTIC CHIC

9 Incredible Bars and Restaurants That Used to Be Other Things

Occupying everything from old streamliners and airplanes to bank vaults and power plants, these establishments revel in their structures’ storied histories.

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Continue reading 9 Incredible Bars and Restaurants That Used to Be Other Things

These Are the Most Fabulously Unexpected Hotel Amenities

As avid travelers, we come to expect certain amenities in every hotel: coffee and water readily available in the lobby, turndown service nightly, complimentary bath products. So when a hotel goes above and beyond the normal provisions, we take notice. Here are eight hotels that are changing the hospitality game.

Photo: Courtesy of Hamilton Princess & Beach Club

Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, Bermuda

Decoding the key to transit on an island that forbids car rentals is not the way to start off a relaxing trip. The Hamilton Princess & Beach Club eases the pain by providing their guests with electric Renault Twizy vehicles. thehamiltonprincess.com

Photo: Stevie Mann / Courtesy of &Beyond

&Beyond Bateleur Camp, Kenya

Getting up to work out while home is hard enough; having to roll out of bed on vacation and head to the hotel gym is even harder. &Beyond Bateleur Camp makes it easy for their guests to squeeze in a workout by providing a “gym-in-a-basket” in each guestroom. andbeyond.com

Photo: Courtesy of Nantucket Island Resorts

Nantucket Island Resorts, Massachusetts

It’s always the little things forgotten when we travel: a toothbrush, face cream, or, worst of all, headphones. Nantucket Island Resorts knows the packing struggle is all too real, which is why they teamed up with Bowers & Wilkins to offer guests headphones and speakers to borrow during their stay. nantucketislandresorts.com

 
Photo: Courtesy of Claridge’s

Claridge’s, London

Forget your pajamas? Claridge’s Hotel has you covered. Suite guests are treated to complimentary silk pajamas designed by Olivia von Halle, featuring a black-and-white striped design inspired by the hotel’s lobby. Every night you slip into this decadent sleepwear helps ensure a lasting memory of your stay. claridges.co.uk

Photo: Courtesy of Muse St. Tropez

Muse St. Tropez

Feeling the burn? Summon one of the Muse’s sunscreen butlers to lend a hand in protecting your skin from harmful UV rays. You’ll never have those random spots of sunburn again. muse-hotels.com

Photo: Courtesy of Nayara Springs

Nayara Springs, Costa Rica

Missing your pets while away on vacation? Nayara Springs has an up-close-and-personal on-site sloth sanctuary on the grounds to hold you over until you get back home to your furry friends. nayarasprings.com

Photo: Courtesy of Planters Inn

Planters Inn, Charleston, South Carolina

A weary traveler’s late-night sweet tooth may not be satisfied by the typical square of chocolate left on the pillow with turndown service. Planters Inn in Charleston shows off one of the town’s specialties by leaving macarons on the bedside. plantersinn.com

Photo: Courtesy of The Berkeley

The Berkeley, London

The Berkeley knows that all good music sounds better on vinyl, especially British artists like The Beatles and Pink Floyd. That’s why they provide all their suite guests with a record player and a curated selection of vinyl by Britain’s finest. the-berkeley.co.uk

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The 9 Most Stunning Islands Off U.S. Shores

There’s no denying the allure of Santorini and Sardinia, but we’ve got plenty of idyllic islands to explore in our own backyard. From upscale enclaves favored by presidents and celebrities to low-key nature preserves teeming with wildlife, the best islands off U.S. shores are perfect for a summer getaway—no passport required.

Photo: Patrick O’Brien / Courtesy of Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Charleston is consistently ranked among the best cites in the U.S., so it should come as no surprise that Kiawah Island—where Charlestonians go in the summer—is one of the country’s most gorgeous islands. With ten miles of pristine beaches, legendary golf courses at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, and nature trails among the marshes, it’s the perfect place for a family vacation or romantic getaway.

Photo: Courtesy of Sunset Beach

Shelter Island, New York

When New Yorkers need to escape the concrete jungle, this island between the Hamptons and Long Island’s North Fork is one of the places they go. Buzzing with visitors in summer, it’s a blissfully unpretentious alternative to the Hamptons with plenty of rural charm. Find a dash of New York sophistication at Sunset Beach, a twenty-room hotel by André Balazs.

Photo: Dennis Frates / Alamy Stock Photo

Lanai, Hawaii

Pristine beaches, winding roads clinging to cliffs over the Pacific, volcanoes, and lush tropical landscapes—Hawaii’s islands draw vacationers from all over the U.S. As one of the smaller, more under-the-radar isles, Lanai boasts blissfully crowd-free beaches, dramatic cliffs, and luxe accommodations like the recently renovated Four Seasons Lanai.

 
Photo: Getty Images

Cumberland Island, Georgia

Georgia’s largest barrier island is an 18-mile stretch of undeveloped beaches and marshes teeming with wildlife, including shrimp, sea turtles, and alligators, not to mention the horses that roam the land. Protected by the National Park Service, the island’s natural beauty has been preserved. Pitch a tent or book a room at the comfortable Greyfield Inn.

Photo: Getty Images

Mackinac Island, Michigan

We wouldn’t blame you for mistaking Mackinac Island for the Caribbean—the water is the same vibrant shade of turquoise. This car-free stretch of land in Lake Huron feels like a blast from the past thanks to enchanting properties like Mission Point and the Grand Hotel, which have been welcoming guests for over a hundred years.

Photo: Getty Images

Gasparilla Island, Florida

The Florida Keys may be more famous, but that just means this barrier island off the Gulf Coast remains a secret hideaway for insiders. It’s been a low-key luxury vacation spot since J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilts started visiting in the pre-Prohibition days. Check into the Gasparilla Inn for a taste of that Jazz Age life.

 
Photo: Getty Images

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

This idyllic New England enclave is the preferred vacation spot of preppy Bostonians and of presidential families including the Kennedys, the Clintons, and the Obamas. You’ll find plenty of historic charm, scenic lighthouses, beautiful beaches, and yachts. Rent a house like the locals do or stay at the funky new Summercamp by Lark Hotels.

Photo: Getty Images

Mount Desert Island, Maine

Thick pine forests, waves crashing against rocky cliffs, sandy beaches—this little island off the shores of Bar Harbor is the stuff summer-camp dreams are made of. Stay at the quaint Asticou Inn and spend your days hiking and swimming in Acadia National Park, whose carriage paths were commissioned by John D. Rockefeller.

Photo: Charity Burggraaf / Courtesy of the Willows Inn

Lummi Island, Washington

This little island in the Salish Sea off the coast of Washington state has become a pilgrimage site for foodies thanks to award-winning chef Blaine Wetzel’s must-try Pacific Northwest cuisine at the Willows Inn. Spend your days spotting orca whales and exploring the forests and coastline where Wetzel forages for ingredients that appear on your plate.

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