Tag Archives: restaurant

Restaurant Hires Designers To Redecorate Their Bathroom Without Changing Its Old Tiles, So They Did This

Gyva Grafika, a creative design and decor studio from Lithuania, has perfectly upgraded the walls of an old toilet, bringing the outside to the inside.

They were asked by a restaurant called Galeria Urbana to redecorate their old bathroom without changing its tiles. So, the artists photographed a neighborhood in Kaunas they grew up in and printed some stickers. The result- an unusual interactive experience like you haven’t seen before.

“Lithuania often neglects its public spaces,” Gyva Grafika told Bored Panda. “A lot of people live in the cleanest apartments but once they step outside the situation changes completely. Stairwells, yards, and other public spaces are usually abandoned and ignored. For this reason, we have decided to balance these daily surroundings and introduced the outside to the inside.” Thus, the “WC for architects” was born.

Following the success of the project, Gyva Grafika has now decided to sell tiles just like these. If you’re interested, contact them on social media.

More info: gyvagrafika.lt | Behance | Facebook (h/t dyt)

A restaurant has asked a creative design studio to redecorate their old bathroom

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

But they were told not to remove its old tiles

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

So, the studio decided to photograph the neighborhood they grew up in and turn the images into stickers

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“There were people who didn’t trust the paparazzi they saw through their windows. Some even went outside to question us”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“But we would tell them about the art project we were working on and they would happily leave us alone”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“Lithuania often neglects its public spaces”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“A lot of people live in the cleanest apartments but once they step outside the situation changes completely”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“Stairwells, yards, and other public spaces are usually abandoned and ignored”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

“For this reason, we have decided to balance these daily surroundings and introduced the outside to the inside”

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

Thus, the “WC For Architects” was born

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

Image credits: Gyva Grafika

Would you like to sit on this toilet? Let us know in the comments below!

Continue reading Restaurant Hires Designers To Redecorate Their Bathroom Without Changing Its Old Tiles, So They Did This

9-Year-Old Boy Keeps Getting In Trouble For Doodling In Class, Eventually Gets A Job Decorating The Walls Of A Restaurant

Most of us probably remember doodling inside our notebooks during boring lessons back at school. And 9-year-old Joe Whale doodled in class so much, he even got in trouble for it! However, after realizing his fondness of doodling, the boy’s parents sent him to an after-school art class where Joe’s talent was quickly noticed by the teachers. Not only that, impressed by the boy’s skill, a local restaurant named Number 4 even invited him to decorate their dining room!

Joe Whale is a 9-year-old boy who loves doodling so much, it even got him in trouble in class!

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Joe covers all of his notebooks in doodles

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

In a recent interview with Bored Panda, Greg, Joe’s father, said the boy was added to the Gifted registry in his primary school when he was just 4 years old along with his identical twin brother Jesse.

After noticing Joe’s talent, his parents sent him to an after-school drawing class where his skill was noticed by his teachers

Image credits: Greg Whale

A restaurant named ‘Number 4’ noticed Joe’s drawings

Image credits: Greg Whale

The restaurant noticed Joe’s talent after a teacher shared his drawings on Instagram.

And invited him to decorate the walls of their dining room!

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

After school is over, Joe’s dad drives him to the restaurant where he continues to draw his masterpiece

Image credits: Greg Whale

“They wanted to get Joe into their restaurant to complete an art piece on their wall, and it was in their main dining area, we were over the moon,” said Greg in a previous interview. “I asked Joe and he, of course, leaped at the chance to do it so we have been going there after school where for a couple of hours a night he’ll put his creativity on their wall.”

Joe has been given total creative freedom

Image credits: Greg Whale

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: Greg Whale

Image credits: Greg Whale

Joe spent about 12 hours decorating the restaurant’s walls – and the result turned out amazing!

Greg gave some advice to other parents: “I would advise parents to encourage their children to always follow their passion and dreams — research local workshops or groups within your local community.”

Joe even earned the nickname of The Doodle Boy and has now got his own website

Image credits: Caters

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Joe’s doodles are incredibly playful and creative

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

Image credits: Caters

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

“Joe loves doodling and we’re so proud of everything he’s achieving, the fact that a completely independent business has asked our 9-year old son to do a professional piece of work for them is incredible,” added Greg.

Joe wants to become a professional artist

Image credits: The Doodle Boy

And his family supports him!

Image credits: Greg Whale

People loved Joe’s doodles





Continue reading 9-Year-Old Boy Keeps Getting In Trouble For Doodling In Class, Eventually Gets A Job Decorating The Walls Of A Restaurant

How A Unique Approach to Cash Flow Has Helped This Architect Construct Her Business

How A Unique Approach to Cash Flow Has Helped This Architect Construct Her Business
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Leslie Saul & Associates, Inc. is an architecture and interior design firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts that primarily services the greater Boston and Miami areas. The business focuses on renovations including offices, restaurants, retail stores, senior living facilities, private homes, universities, churches, and synagogues, among many other building types. Founder Leslie Saul says that having such a broad practice has helped her maintain a business for more than 26 years. Additionally, her attention to quality and value have brought back return customers and helped retain long-term employees.  

Why did you start your business?

I went to Rhode Island School of Design. When I applied, I wanted to be a painter. I took a gap year and realized that I’m a people person. I got my degree in architecture. Even when I was in school, I was really focused on interiors, partly because of my painting background.

I worked my way up in the architecture business, working for various firms. I talked to a friend from a big firm who mentioned a model shop they didn’t really use. He mentioned that maybe I should start my own firm. Once I had that space, I asked my previous firm to buy me out. I wanted my firm to be family-friendly, with flextime and things like that. Those things are very common now, but at the time, I had a four-year-old and I felt limited by not having them, even though I was a principal at my old firm.

How did you fund the business at the start?

I used my savings. And, in 1992, American Express gave me credit even though I had no income. My husband worked, so we had one income, but we gave up everything, from newspapers to dinners out. Within six months of starting, we were cash flow neutral.

How do you manage cash flow?

We ask for retainers from our clients. It needs to be enough money to show a seriousness of purpose, even though it might not necessarily cover the costs for the first month. When we get inquiries, we sometimes do some initial low-cost services that get clients comfortable working with us

To help with cash flow, I don’t take a big salary to keep a lot of cash in the business. I’ve never missed a paycheck over 26 years, except for my own. I’ve learned that people will stick with you if you stick with them. If you lay people off at the start of a slow down, you may not be able to hire people when you need them. Though that may negatively impact cash flow, we have the benefit of keeping our team together and being able to produce very quickly when new clients bring us on board.

What’s the most challenging thing about running the company?

Continuing to grow the quality of projects and clients. I’ve never focused on quantity. When I worked for larger firms that do focus on quantity, it felt like I was just keeping the underlings motivated versus getting my own satisfaction from any of the work.

What’s the most rewarding thing about running the company?

Seeing the successes and development of the people who have worked for us over the years. Not only the long-timers, but also the people who move away and call me and say, “I always say to myself, what would Leslie do?” That’s very rewarding and I feel very proud of them!

There’s no better gratification than seeing a finished product and knowing how you’ve fulfilled a client’s needs and wants and overcome their challenges. Just this morning, we were talking to an old client who said, “I’m not sure if I ever told you how much we love this and how perfect everything you did was!”

Resources Page Can’t get enough? We’ve got tons of business tools and resources right here.

What’s the biggest mistake you made when starting out?

We’ve made some economic mistakes like setting a fee too low or not really understanding the scope before starting a project. I was and probably still am easily bullied when it comes to money, especially when it comes to doing work for larger firms.

What’s the smartest thing you did when starting out?

I asked a friend to help me and he said I needed a good phone number. It was so memorable! People still say they call that number when they try to reach us, even though we moved 19 years ago!

Also, I hired people who filled my weaknesses. I think a lot of entrepreneurs hire themselves, especially in my industry. The smartest thing you can do is to be honest with yourself about what your weaknesses are and hire people that are good at those things. Together, you’re better than anyone individually.

What advice would you give to a new entrepreneur?

You will do great! Always believe in yourself! Always do the right thing. Always stay true to your values and remember your reputation can’t be rebuilt.

What’s next for Leslie Saul & Associates, Inc.

I’ll be turning 65 and I want to keep this going. I really enjoy what I do. I like the idea that design services should not just be the exclusive benefit of wealthy people. I feel like there are others who have needs that we can help meet. So, I feel like I haven’t finished and there’s a lot in our future.  

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ABOUT AUTHOR

Ashley Sweren

Ashley Sweren

Ashley Sweren is a freelance marketing writer and editor. She owns her own small business, Firework Writing (http://www.fireworkwritingonline.com/), located in San Jose, California.

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Continue reading How A Unique Approach to Cash Flow Has Helped This Architect Construct Her Business

16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

Popularity for Danish furniture continues to surge. A great place to experience this in action: 3DaysofDesign, which was held May 23-25 in Copenhagen. With product and brand launches, exhibitions and pop-up events, and a record 150 exhibitors, the sixth edition of Denmark’s annual design event was bigger and bolder this year, with increased citywide presence in part due to a graphic identity crafted by Spanish artist and designer Jaime Hayon. From Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings now available to all, archival pieces finding a new audience, and a reinvention of the lowly toilet brush, here are 16 of our favorite finds.

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

 

Take home your very own Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings with the Holmen collection from Space Copenhagen. Noma, the Copenhagen restaurant lauded as one of the best in the world, auctioned off its oak side tables by cabinet maker Malte Gormsen for a cool $4,000 a piece—while the MG 205 side table by Malte Gormsen was offered at a more reasonable price point. 

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

The browned oak and metal MG 101 dining chair, also part of the Holmen collection by Malte Gormsen for Space Copenhagen, once furnished the 108 restaurant in Copenhagen, a Noma-spin off.

Photography courtesy of Carl Hansen & Søn.

An archival piece with a distinctive pressed veneer backrest saw daylight once more with Carl Hansen & Søn ‘s re-release of the Contour lounge chair, designed by Børge Mogensen in 1949. Available in oak, walnut, or a combination of the two, the chair stays true to original sketches— with the exception of added comfort in the form of an upholstered seat.

Photography courtesy of File Under Pop.

File Under Pop presented a new brand focusing on surfaces, first previewed in Milan last month. A collaboration between File Under Pop founder and creative director Josephine Akvama Hoffmeyer and architect Elisa Ossino, H+O is a modular tile brand applicable for use on walls, floors, and ceilings. The large-format Rilievi collection consists of eight different tiles with three-dimensional geometric surfaces available in four color ways.

Photography courtesy of &Tradition.

The distinctive shape of a fungus brings the USB-chargeable Setago table lamp for &Tradition to life. Just like a mushroom, the wireless lamp, designed by Jaime Hayon and first presented in Milan this year, can be plucked and moved at ease.

Photography courtesy of Takt.

The stackable oak and plywood Cross chair by London studio PearsonLloyd for the freshly launched design brand Takt can be shipped flatpack—one of the factors leading to its sustainable certification. It’s also made of 100 percent FSC-certified wood.

Photography courtesy of Wehlers.

Fishing nets and steel are recycled and repurposed for the fabrication of the R.U.M. chair—short for ReUsedMaterials—designed by C. F. Møller Design for Wehlers.

Photography courtesy of Please Wait to be Seated.

Bulk just where you want it—at the seat pad—is behind the name of the tubular steel Tubby Tube, a stool by Faye Toogood for Please Wait to be Seated.

Photography courtesy of Jot.jot.

The comfort of wood and the strength of steel are a successful union for the slim yet sturdy and stackable Shadow chair by Boris Berlin Design for Jot.jot.

Photography courtesy of Skagerak.

Bold color marks the 20th anniversary of the Cutter Jubilee bench by Niels Hvass for Skagerak , now available in scarlet red-lacquered oak.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

The armchair, later nicknamed the Grasshopper due to its nod to the herbivorous insect, was first designed by Finn Juhl in 1938. However, it wasn’t until much later that the chair’s avant-garde form received appreciation. Before its release at Milan Design Week under House of Finn Juhl, the firm that carries on the designer’s legacy, only two existed—and one auctioned off for $360,000 in 2018.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

House of Finn Juhl also presented Finn Juhl’s extendable Bovirke table, which premiered at an exhibition in 1948. Available in oak or walnut, Bovirke nearly doubles in size, from 55 inches to 94 inches long.

The Bovirke table by Finn Juhl, an archival piece released by House of Finn Juhl. Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.
Photography courtesy of Fredericia.

In tribute to the former home of Copenhagen’s Royal Mail—now the manufacturer’s showroom—Fredericia presented the Post collection by Cecilie Manz. A plywood seat and back combines with a solid wood frame for the Post chair. First previewed in Milan last month, the collection also includes a table.

Photography courtesy of Unidrain.

A 3 Days of Design breakfast event celebrated the lowly toilet brush with a presentation from Unidrain. With an inner container fitted with a splash guard and a replaceable brush head resisting both water and paper collection, Toilet Brush Wall Mounted Copper is engineered to reduce bacteria and mess.

Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.

 The distinctive shape of a technical drawing tool—the compass—inspired the back of the Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman, while cushions take cues from the round sphere it draws.

The Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman. Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.
Photography courtesy of Montana.

Montana introduced a new color palette for its signature shelving—an endeavor the manufacturer undertakes every eight years. Developed in collaboration with Danish designer Margrethe Odgaard, the 30 new hues include amber, rhubarb, flint, and chamomile, shown (clockwise) here.

Continue reading 16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

THIS RESTAURANT OFFERS DINERS INSTAGRAM KITS TO HELP NAIL THE ULTIMATE #FOODIE SNAP

Nailing that perfect Instagram shot of your food in a restaurant is no mean feat.

Ashamedly, a quick discussion around the ELLE office has revealed many of us have been guilty of preventing a partner from touching their hot chocolate before we snapped a photograph, and even considered standing on a chair to capture that hawk-eye shot of a particularly lovely-looking eggs Benedict.
Oh, and believe us, we’re totally aware of how sickeningly close this reality is to “Black Mirror.”

However, one London restaurant is now coming to Instagram-obsessed diners’ rescue and helping them up their #foodporn a notch.

London based eatery Dirty Bones is offering customers free Instagram kits that include a portable LED camera light, a multi-device charger, a clip-on wide angle camera lens and a tripod selfie stick for overhead table shots, so they can achieve those likable snaps.

A spokesperson for Dirty Bones, which offers customers New York-style American comfort food, explained to Mashable: “People love to share what they’re eating on social media, so we wanted to put together something that made it easier to get that perfect shot regardless of the lighting or time of day.”

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