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34 Illustrations Of Pop Culture Characters By EFIX Blend Into Walls And Sidewalks

When it comes to street art, there are usually two different opinions. One says that we can hardly call it ‘art’ and that it’s destroying the architecture in cities, while the other considers it art that not only colors the grayness of the concrete walls, but also gives more soul to old buildings. However, it is hard to argue about the works of one artist who is best known by the name EFIX since they actually help to ‘restore’ the city. Scroll down for Bored Panda’s interview with the artist!

More info: Instagram | efix.fr

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Water Bottle 4 days agoCreative

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#2

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Carrot dude 4 days agoLove the incorporation of this one 🙂

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30-year-old Barcelona-based artist EFIX is not only a street artist, but also a graphic designer and musician. He uses his art to ‘fix’ the ugly cityscape, such as cracks in concrete walls, broken pipes, etc. His tools are his humorous cartoons and illustrations of pop culture characters who perfectly blend into walls and sidewalks, interacting with their surroundings in a completely natural way and making streets look more alive. “I work a lot with Disney and Simpsons characters in general because they have already lived all the lives that any human being can have, so usually, when I see a shape that I like in the street, I take a picture of it and then I look at the photo every day to find an idea. Once I have the idea… I try to move it to the world of cartoons so that it touches my viewer even more easily,” says the artist.

#3

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

#4

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

tuzdayschild 4 days agoWho else heard the music immediately?

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His career as a street artist started five years ago when he began to notice the unpleasant features of streets and buildings in Barcelona. That’s actually where his motivation and inspiration come from! EFIX decided to use his artwork to cover these unpleasant features and make his city even more beautiful. “What I like the most about street art is, first of all, the emotions it causes in people in general when I do my street art. I have a city cleaner costume, I put it on and then I sit in the street and watch the passers-by marvel at it, especially the children. It’s such a pleasant feeling to see a smile born on a face. And more personally, I like the feeling of giving something without expecting anything in return. Street art has taught me this value and it’s really rewarding.”

#5

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Young Minami Kotaro 4 days agoeven banksy will laugh 😀

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“My street art, in my eyes, wants to be positive street art. That’s why I take care never to damage the supports around me. I don’t want to disturb anything, so I prefer to make ephemeral art⁠—I find that there is a real poetic sense in that. This is why I use materials that do not stay over time, i.e. paper supports. And I use water and flour-based glues to create a texture that dissolves easily in the rain, or if the owner does not endorse my art. Just before creating the work, I take a photo of the wall and come with a meter to take its measurements. Once I have the proportions of the visuals, I go home and I draw it in the right dimensions. At one time, I tried to create my own colors with flower pigments, but I had a little trouble killing the flowers for my personal pleasure. And then, at nightfall, I come to paint my street art so that in the morning, it can work its magic on passers-by,” the artist explains his creative process.

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Kjorn 4 days agoit won’t work… it never do well

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The artist draws popular and easily recognizable pop culture characters that come from cartoons and that most of us associate with our childhood. “I like to use Disney characters because they have a very strong relationship with childhood and touching the viewer at the root is even more beautiful in my eyes,” explains the artist. From The Simpsons, Tom & Jerry, to the Lion King and Mowgli and many more, it surely gives us that feeling of nostalgia and perfectly decorates the streets of Barcelona.

#9

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

glowworm2 5 days agoYes! This is a classic!

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#10

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Young Minami Kotaro 4 days ago (edited)I tawt I taw a puddy tat..

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“I started street art because I come from a big art school where you have the designers who end up in Pixar’s studios, for example. But I preferred to be interested in music, personally. Since leaving this school, I’ve had a very strong relationship with the street, where my job at the start was to record street artists and to mix my influences with theirs. I was very quickly influenced by the street because during the day, I recorded them with my microphones and at night, I composed. It leaves you with this feeling that the world belongs to you and you can then rediscover the world as you see it,” says EFIX. “I just want to say that no matter who we are, we have to believe in ourselves because nobody will do it for us. And if you have some crazy ideas, follow your ideas to the end. The world needs creativity, that’s what feeds it!”

#11

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Pan Narrans 5 days agoLove this one! Nice in the streets but would also be fabulous in the garden.

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#13

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Faizal Jam 4 days agosideshow bob

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#14

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Young Minami Kotaro 4 days agoextremely creative…

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#15

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Night Owl 5 days ago*splat* Looks like someone drove over it

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#16

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

teeshy hedding 4 days agocreative!!!

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

boredpanDaman 4 days ago (edited)oh i though the pipe “is” a pen. pls make it a pen!

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Kailyn Patin 5 days agosooo cute:D

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

tuzdayschild 4 days agoAs if Homer would be caught dead with an apple.

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#21

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

4 days agoSo creative 😀

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#23

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

TheGr81sComing 4 days agowhy u always lying pinochio

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#24

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

teeshy hedding 4 days agoI would love to see this in public

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#25

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Autumn Walton 3 days agoawwwwwwwwwwww 🙂

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Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

#27

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

boredpanDaman 4 days agohahah! perfect!

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#28

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Autumn Walton 3 days agoBut Marie would never!!!

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#29

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Delaney Dellinger 3 days agothese paintings match perfect with the things on the street

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#30

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Night Owl 5 days agoFits perfectly 😀

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#31

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Ralph Winn 4 days agothese are all wonderful.

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#32

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

Bill 4 days agoDoin the Bartman

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#33

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

LoveLaughLucia 3 days agoreminds me of kikis delivery service!!!

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#34

Artist Manages To Take The Boredom Out Of Common Spaces With Pop Culture Characters, Who Fit Perfectly With The Scene

efixworld Report

bahamut 4 days agowas it peeing in the fountain or standing nude in an art gallery

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Continue reading 34 Illustrations Of Pop Culture Characters By EFIX Blend Into Walls And Sidewalks

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10 Questions With… Jasper Morrison

The Soft Modular sofa by Jasper Morrison for Vitra. Photography by Marc Eggimann.

“From a very young age, I understood that I had a kind of over-sensitivity to atmospheres,” admits Jasper Morrison. In his desire to influence them, the British designer has become one of the most successful industrial designers of the modern day. Emeco, Flos, Vitra, and Mattiazzi are among his high-profile clients, while the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museumand the Museum of Modern Art in New York are just two of the prominent museums around the world highlighting his work.

In Morrison’s latest collection, a limited-edition cork furniture series launching during NYCxDESIGN this week, faulty wine bottle corks rejected during the production process find new life. To present the collection, Morrison turned to gallery Kasmin in New York—a union which also celebrates a lifelong friendship. In 1970s England, the Chelsea gallery’s owner, Paul Kasmin, was a schoolmate. On view May 9 through June 29, “Corks” unveils Morrison’s first complete series in the material, with a chaise longue, chairs, stools, bookshelves, and a fireplace. Interior Design sat down with Morrison to hear more about the new cork collection, recent Milan launches, and what London restaurant personifies his design mentality with celeriac and a boiled egg.

Interior Design: Why cork?

Jasper Morrison: I have done a few things in cork before and came to understand what a great material it is, both to the touch and in terms of what it does for the atmosphere of a room. It is difficult to do anything big industrially with it, because the material cost is quite high, the machining cost higher, and it needs to be hand-finished—so it really only works for limited production.

ID: What’s the design concept behind the cork pieces?

JM: The process is rather sculptural as the pieces have to be machined out of large blocks of cork. It’s very different from designing things for mass production, which tends to be more about structure than volume. The concept is really just about finding good shapes to make each piece of furniture work well. The material suggests its own formal language, but you need to make sure there’s the right balance of softness and tension in the forms. The repurposed corks come from a producer in Portugal. The primary product produced by cork is still the wine bottle stopper, and they grind these up and form them into blocks under pressure with a glue. I’ve known about this material for many years and have used it for a few smaller pieces, which were economic enough to be made in quantities.

Read more: 10 Questions With… Bethan Gray

“Corks,” a series of limited-edition furniture by Jasper Morrison, on view at gallery Kasmin in New York. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.

ID: What else have you completed recently?

JM: Some new chairs as usual—at any one time I’m always working on at least four or five chairs. At Salone del Mobile this year, I presented a slightly sculptural solid wood chair called Fugu for the Japanese brand Maruni.

For Emeco, a company I have been working with very closely for the last five years or so, I did a cleaning-up job of a few of their heritage pieces—a chair, armchair, and swivel chairs from 1948 known as the Navy Officers collection. When I first saw them, I nicknamed them the ugly sisters. We really had to rework and fine-tune them to make them more appealing for today’s market. From the proportions and thicknesses of structure to upholstery detailing, they really came from another era, when things were done in a very different way. I guess they were made to last, but they were a bit over-the-top in terms of structure.

We also just completed a big collection of tableware called Raami for the Finnish brand Iittala.

ID: What’s upcoming for you?

JM: For Vitra, I have been working on a long-term project that is a quite technologically advanced chair. We hope to launch it in Milan 2020. We are also working on adding to the tableware collection we just finished for Iittala and on another chair for Emeco.

Read more: 15 Young Design Talents to Watch from Salone del Mobile

The Fugu chair by Jasper Morrison for Maruni. Photography courtesy of Maruni.

 

ID: How did your childhood influence your design thinking?

JM: When I was growing up in London in the early 1960s, the standard interior was very claustrophobic and quite gloomy, with a lot of curtains, upholstery, and sofas—everything was heavy and upholstered.

Then, at maybe four or five years old, I discovered this room my grandfather had made for himself. It was in England—but, while working for a Danish company, he had discovered the Scandinavian way of making interiors. I think he had quite a good eye, and the room was well-lit with lots of daylight, wooden floors, and just a few rugs. There was less upholstery and more lightweight seating, a record player by Dieter Rams from the German company Braun, and an open fire. Suddenly I just felt way better in that space, and realizing that there were some places that made me feel good and others that didn’t had a huge effect on me. I’m pretty sure I became a designer to have some influence on my surroundings and to generally improve atmospheres for others as well.

ID: In what kind of home do you live?

JM: I live in a few different homes, but mostly on the south coast of England with my wife and three children. These places are all furnished either with my own designs (for testing purposes) or with other designs I admire. I have a lot of Danish furniture, especially Børge Mogensen and Mogens Koch, but also pieces by Enzo Mari and Achille Castiglioni. There’s a Charlotte Perriand armchair which I got recently which I love. Right now, my Alfi chairs for Emeco are around my dining table. It’s an important learning process to live with things and assess how successful they are or not!

The Lepic kitchen by Jasper Morrison for Schiffini. Photography by Miro Zagnoli.

ID: Is there a person in the industry that you particularly admire?

JM: When Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec hit the scene, I remember describing their design language as like a new color—something you haven’t seen before, something you didn’t expect. They made a big impression on me and today they are still probably the designers I respect the most. Their vision is very individual and they have great design.

ID: Could you name an Instagram account you follow?

JM: There’s a funny little account that actually hardly anyone follows. It’s called @terencepoe and is by architect Terence Poe of Poe + Poe. I share an eye with him somehow and he actually posts a lot of my stuff as well. But that’s not why I’m following him! He posts things that are quite obscure but interesting, which I really like, which I may know and also think are great.

The Zampa stool by Jasper Morrison for Mattiazzi. Photography by Fabian Frinzel.

ID: What are you reading?

JM: “Hokusai: A Life in Drawing,” which is an illustrated introduction by Henri-Alexis Baatsch to the work of Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai, who is somebody I’ve been interested in for a long time. He did a lot of woodblock prints but he also did a lot of drawings, which I like as they’re very human. He just drew these kind of normal things, everyday stuff, and I admire that because that could not have been easy at that time. He was supposed to toe the line and do beautiful drawings of actors and actresses and set pieces, but he just did his own thing. They’re incredibly great drawings and there’s nothing old about them, they’re still very contemporary.

ID: Do you have a secret you can share?

JM: The St. John restaurant Smithfield Supper on St. John Street in Smithfield, London is hardly a secret, but I think they do with food exactly what I do with things. As an example, a French friend of mine went there for dinner and ordered a dish called Celeriac and Boiled Egg. When the plate arrived, it was just a plate of celeriac with a boiled egg on top—with its shell still on. My friend was outraged she had to do all the work, but for me that’s a fantastic example of what they do best. It’s really straightforward: What you order is what you get. That really matches my design philosophy.

Keep scrolling to see more of Jasper Morrison’s work >

The O Watt restaurant, with interior design by Jasper Morrison, in the historic EDP building in Lisbon, Portugal. Photography by Francisco Rivotti.
“Corks,” a series of limited-edition furniture by Jasper Morrison, on view at gallery Kasmin in New York. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.
The Zampa stool by Jasper Morrison for Mattiazzi. Photography by Fabian Frinzel.
The T&O table by Jasper Morrison for Maruni. Photography courtesy of Maruni.
The Superloon adjustable LED panel light by Jasper Morrison for Flos. Photography by Jasper Morrison Studio.
The Palma cast iron cookware set by Jasper Morrison for Oigen. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.
The 2 Inch aluminum table by Jasper Morrison for Emeco. Photography by Miro Zagnoli.
The Navy Officer chair series with an update by Jasper Morrison for Emeco. Photography courtesy of Emeco.

Read more: 10 Questions With… Philippe Starck

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