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Tag Archives: Privacy

20 Perfectly Tranquil Bathtubs

Only one room in the house offers relaxation, aromatherapy, and soak-the-stress-away privacy—the bathroom. Here are 20 tranquil bathtubs to dream about sinking into (glass of wine optional, but recommended).

1. Frequent Collaborators dSpace Studio and Project Interiors Team Up to Design a Modernist Family Residence in Chicago

After raising their three children in a typical painted-clapboard house on a double lot in Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood, the owners decided to demolish it and build a modernist structure that better reflected their style. They engaged architects Kevin Toukoumidis and Robert McFadden of dSpace Studio, who recommended Project Interiors for the interior design—their fourth collaboration. Both firms share a progressive, contemporary spirit that appealed to the clients. Read more about the residence

2. Hotel Alessandra is Houston-Based Rottet Studio’s First Hometown Project

Rottet Studio has designed hotels all over, but none in Houston, where Lauren Rottet’s roots run deep—her firm has been headquartered there for more than a decade. None, that is, until now. Hotel Alessandra, a 21-story ground-up property done in collaboration with Gensler, is the Interior Design Hall of Fame member’s hospitality debut in the city. In a stan­dard guest room, an acrylic tub outfits the bathroom. Read more about the hotel

3. Los Angeles Residence by Standard Architecture Wins 2018 Best of Year Award for Kitchen/Bath Project

Designed in the 1920s by noted architect Roland Coate, this tony Bel-Air residence had seen better days. Standard Architecture‘s founding principal Jeffrey Allsbrook and partner Silvia Kuhle stripped away excess inside and out to create a minimalist, abstracted take on neoclassical design. Namibian marble clads the wet zone of the upstairs master bathroom, one of a pair. The stone’s quiet veining creates a pleasingly neutral backdrop—all the better to soak in the surrounding greenery through the frameless picture window. Read more about the residence

4. Hilltop Aerie by Aidlin Darling Design Provides Respite in Northern California

Two San Francisco denizens working in finance and tech came to Aidlin Darling Design with a straightforward proposition. Create a simple, efficient house, restrained in cost and scale, for their empty hillside site in Glen Ellen, about an hour north of the city. The couple’s only imperative? A single-story plan. Off a winding dirt road, the 20-acre property is at the foothills of the Mayacamas Mountains, overlooking the Sonoma Valley. Read more about the residence

5. Gulla Jónsdóttir’s Global Sensibilities Define the Kimpton La Peer Hotel in Los Angeles

Kimpton La Peer Hotel is the jewel in Gulla Jónsdóttir’s crown, a 65,000-square-foot property in L.A. “It’s the first ground-up hotel in West Hollywood’s design district,” Jónsdóttir says. She was creative director for and designer of the four-story project’s 105 guest rooms and suites, alfresco lounges, and vast living-roomlike lobby. Read more about the hotel

6. Rottet Studio Brings Texas Tradition to the Cavalry Court Hotel

Decidedly tied to place, not only the university but also the agricultural surroundings, the aesthetic of Cavalry Court Hotel skews rustic with honest, straightforward materials and forms. Yet, typical Rottet Studio, it’s still polished. And we couldn’t call it traditional. Her scheme is devised to appeal to a wide-reaching demographic, from visiting alumni to business travelers and locals. A guest bathroom’s custom vanity combines matte granite, blackened steel, and pine. Read more about the hotel

7. Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal. In the master bath, a custom teak and limestone vanity supports a Duravit sink and Watermark faucet; behind the MTI soaker bathtub is a wall of Stone Source’s chiseled limestone. Read more about the brownstone

8. MoreySmith Renovates a 19th-Century London Townhouse With a Mix of Luxe and Historical Details

The owners of an early 19th-century townhouse in the historic London neighborhood of Clerkenwell knew it needed a bit of an overhaul. So, they turned to MoreySmith to breathe new life into the home and make it fit for entertaining. Specialist craftsmen restored or replaced heritage cornices and ceiling roses that weren’t in the best condition. Read more about the townhouse

9. An Artsy Sag Harbor Retreat by Groves & Co. Is All About the Mix

It’s one thing to live with art. But to live submerged in it—as do the owners of this Sag Harbor, New York, getaway—requires a whole other level of connoisseurship and commitment, not to mention a rather prolific collection. “The project’s biggest challenge,” says Groves & Co. principal Russell Groves, who masterminded the interiors, “was marrying the very forward art with the traditional envelope.” Linac marble clads the master bathroom, with blackened-steel mirrors. Read more about the residence

10. Kuth-Ranieri and Elena Calabrese Collaborate on Northern California Mid-Century House

A client of Kuth-Ranieri Architects, the mother of three college-aged kids, needed a new home. But she didn’t need a new house: Her mid-century abode on a charming slope in Marin County, California, was a gem. It just needed a rethink. New skylights flood the master bathroom’s walls of blue Heath Ceramics tiles and varying widths of gray Mosa Porcelain which surround a Toto bathtub with Vola fixtures. Read more about the residence

11. Rinck Brings Timeless Elegance to a Parisian Apartment

Paris-based interior architecture firm Rinck describes themselves an “ambassador of French lifestyle.” Founded in 1841 by a cabinetmaker, the firm has divisions that specialize in cabinet-making and boiserie, which can speed up their projects. For example, the firm completed a Paris apartment with views of the Eiffel Tower and the Seine in just six months. Read more about the residence

12. Whitehall Interiors Gives a New York Penthouse Bursts of Personality

Asked to combine a pair of New York condominium apartments into one investment property, Whitehall Interiors eschewed the inoffensive but lifeless aesthetic common to most developer units. The firm gave the client a luxurious penthouse with a lot of personality. A tub set under the window permits panoramic city views while soaking. Read more about the penthouse

13. Stephen B. Jacobs and Andi Pepper Design a Nearly Net-Zero Home in Connecticut

After 30 years in Vermont, Stephen B. Jacobs and Andi Pepper, the architect and interior designer behind some of New York’s hippest lifestyle hotels wanted to move a little closer to the city. They found their ideal location in Lyme, Connecticut, on one of the area’s last pieces of undeveloped land. For Jacobs, the stately cedar and stone house they built was not only a home but also a working model of the sustainability practices he had long advocated, a concrete demonstration for potential clients of the economic and environmental advantages of green design. Read more about the home

14. Yuriy Zimenko Covers a Ukraine Apartment in Bold Colors

An accent wall is one thing, but for a 2,200-square-foot apartment in Kiev, Ukraine, designer Yuriy Zimenko devised full accent rooms, devoting each area to a study in shades—from a master bedroom in a bold purple to bathrooms of red, green, or blue. Read more about the apartment

15. Workstead’s Stefanie Brechbuehler and Robert Highsmith Embrace Southern Modernism in Charleston

This renovation of an 1853 row-house was for a dream client: a New York–based family who gave the studio carte blanche to design the project as if it were their own. Now it’s a crash pad for the family when they’re in town and an event space for the studio when they’re not. In the master bath, formerly a porch, vanity mirrors are mounted on windows painted Farrow & Ball’s Studio Green. Read more about the house

16. Steve Leung Designers Thinks Big for a Model Apartment at One Shenzhen Bay

With its superior location and stunning harbor vista, the residential development One Shenzhen Bay attracts sophisticated buyers and investors. Steve Leung Designers, a Hong Kong firm known for high-end luxury, was the clear choice to execute an appropriately upscale model apartment. Like yin and yang, dark colors contrast with light, and warm tones with cool. Read more about the apartment

17. Bates Masi + Architects Crafts East Hampton Compound For Couple and Company

For many years, the New York–based couple had enjoyed weekending in a traditional Shingle-style residence in the Hamptons. But their kids had grown and flown the coop, leaving the empty nesters feeling encumbered by the big, echoey place. So the pair hired Bates Masi + Architects to design a new house on a cove in East Hampton. Instead, the firm designed four. Well, not four houses exactly, but rather a quartet of cedar-clad buildings around an open courtyard, creating a compound that perfectly suits the couple’s life. Read more about the home

18. Studio GUM’s Asmundo di Gisira Hotel Is Awash in Catania Lore

Studio GUM co-founders Valentina Giampiccolo and Giuseppe Minaldi simultaneously respected history and looked to the future for this hotel in Catania, Sicily. Demolition and construction were minimal, focused on enclosing the courtyard with a skylight, adding en suite bathrooms, and installing herringbone parquet in ebonized oak. Read more about the hotel

19. Sanchez + Coleman Refreshes a Tired Manhattan Apartment With Tropical Vibes

Tasked with refreshing this four-bedroom pied-à-terre on Manhattan’s Upper West Side,Sanchez + Coleman combined chromatic restraint with a touch of Coleman’s old flamboyance. The clients were looking for a luxury kitchen, great kids’ bedrooms, and the latest smart-home features (something the tech-savvy designer was pleased to provide) as essential elements in rejuvenating the tired 1980s apartment. Read more about the residence

20. Lagranja Design Brings Beachy Grandeur to Spain’s ME Sitges Terramar Hotel

Regional craftsmanship was the thrust of the ME Sitges Terramar Hotel outside of Barcelona, Spain, a project by Lagranja Design. Lagranja’s challenge was to bring grandeur back to the rundown seaside relic, its 10 floors housing 213 guest rooms and suites. At the firm’s nearby studio, a 19th-century former biscuit factory, model-makers, artists, and local artisans developed the decorative elements that would accompany the project’s myriad furniture pieces, both custom and production. Read more about the hotel

Continue reading 20 Perfectly Tranquil Bathtubs

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The USC Shoah Foundation in Los Angeles by Belzberg Architects Shines Light on the Darkest Events in Modern History

PROJECT NAME USC Shoah Foundation
LOCATION Los Angeles
FIRM Belzberg Architects
SQ. FT. 10,000 SQF

In 1994, a year after the release of Steven Spielberg’s movie Schindler’s List, the director founded a nonprofit organization to videotape and preserve the testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust (or Shoah in Hebrew). Initially, its home was a series of trailers on a Universal Studios Hollywood backlot. A dozen years later, the organization relocated to the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, where, renamed the USC Shoah Foundation–The Institute for Visual History and Education, it occupied cramped offices on the ground floor of the Leavey Library.

In Los Angeles, visitors interact with touch screens in the lobby of Belzberg Architects’s USC Shoah Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving survivor testimony of the Holocaust and other modern genocides. Photography by Bruce Damonte.
 
The visitors lounge has seating upholstered with custom fabrics printed with vivid patterns derived from traditional artifacts from Rwanda and Guatemala. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

Designing and constructing the new headquarters was a 3 1/2-year, multifaceted project, but one that was full of resonance and personal meaning for Belzberg Architects. While the firm had already shown poetic sensitivity in its 2010 design of the mostly subterranean Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, founding partner and Interior Design Hall of Fame member Hagy Belzberg can also recall hearing stories of his own father’s escape from Poland and the Nazis.

Allied Maker’s pendant fixture illuminates a table and chairs by Minimal in the distinguished guests conference room. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

The foundation’s previous chopped-up quarters had fostered tribal work habits among the permanent staff, which now numbers 82. “We aimed for an open, hyper-functional plan,” Belzberg begins. “There would be a level of scales: from neighborhoods and clusters to the larger whole,” lead architect Lindsey Sherman Contento adds, outlining the collaborative, flexible environment they envisaged, which would include opportunities of respite from the frequently harrowing work.

Nicola Anthony’s stainless-steel sculpture in a skylit area off the lobby incorporates the testimony of a Holocaust survivor. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

This dual essence—remembering hatred in order to overcome it, an endeavor at once painful and healing—is palpable right out of the elevator into the central lobby, which functions as both reception and an exhibition space. “It’s intentionally warm and dark,” Belzberg notes of this public zone, an environment designed to generate a sense of safety while providing museum-quality viewing conditions. Subdued LED light filters through perforated powder-coated-aluminum ceiling panels. Opposite the elevator bank, a wall sheathed in seven floor-to-ceiling touch screens offers a panorama of interactive content. Visitors can further explore foundation programs at freestanding digital kiosks—individual touch screens set in totemlike panels of backlit perforated aluminum framed in dark walnut—that fill the room. “It’s like walking through a forest,” Belzberg says.

In the office area, bays of bench-style workstations flank a broad pathway of carpet tiles and engineered-oak flooring. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

The tenebrous space doesn’t feel claustrophobic, however, because a broad portal at one end opens onto a semicircular skylit area that commands views of the campus and cityscape beyond. Suspended beneath the skylight, Nicola Anthony’s stainless-steel text sculpture incorporates the testimony of a Holocaust survivor. Passageways on the left and right lead to private wings.

Custom benches with upholstery patterns inspired by traditional Chinese and Armenian designs furnish “think tank” booths. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

The larger, predominantly open-plan wing houses most of the full-time staff. A broad blond pathway of engineered-oak flooring and nylon-carpet tiles cuts a diagonal swath through the light and airy work space. Right up front, a casual visitors lounge hugs the wall of windows so that its colorful ottomans and cushy lounge chairs sit in the abundant sunshine. Facing them across the central aisle is an open kitchen that, for film screenings and other events, conjoins with adjacent classroom and conference spaces via sliding glass panels. 

Panels on the lobby’s interactive kiosks are perforated bronze-anodized aluminum. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

As the pathway proceeds deeper into the office area proper, it is flanked by open bays of workstations that provide bench seating, sit-stand desks, and other individual or group work options. Every staff member has a designated place, but each “neighborhood” includes a central table that encourages collaboration. Sculptural built-in banquettes, finished in gleaming white paint, line one section of the path, which culminates in what Belzberg calls the “think tank”—a quiet space divisible by pocket doors into two separate niches.

Molded MDF with bronze insets forms custom banquettes and standing-work desks. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

The smaller wing accommodates distinguished guests and researchers needing the privacy of enclosed rooms. It also has facilities for recording and editing survivor testimonies—the most compelling example of which can be viewed in the distinguished guests lounge: Here, Pinchas Gutter, a Polish survivor born in 1932, appears as a life-size interactive-screen image to tell his story and answer viewers’ questions with the help of AI.

Sliding glass panels open the kitchen and adjacent classroom space for large events. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

The wing is notable for its tranquil, light-filled atmosphere. “Early on, we learned that trauma victims can be sensitive to certain triggers,” interior design lead Jennifer Wu explains, which determined the calm, neutral palette with particularly thoughtful textile and wall-covering choices. “We called for artwork and artifacts from affected countries and used them as inspiration for digitally printed patterns.” Examples appear on lounge seating, pedestal cushions, and phone-booth walls.

In the distinguished guests lounge, custom acoustic panels, installed in a custom pattern, span the wall and ceiling around an interactive display of ?a Holocaust survivor. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

 

Despite the overwhelmingly painful histories with which the foundation must deal, its aura remains positive and hopeful. “We were able to avoid genocide tropes,” Belzberg says. “There is no manipulated emotional response.” With perseverance, study and education will preserve the past and help prevent its recurrence.

Project Team: Cory Taylor; Ashley Coon; Adrian Cortez; Barry Gartin; Aaron Leshtz; Corie Saxman; J. Joshua Hanley; Alexis Roohani; Susan Nwankpa Gillespie; Katelyn Miersma; Melissa Yip: Belzberg Architects. Egg Office: Custom Signage. Maude Group: Exhibition Consultant. Mad Systems: Audiovisual Consultant. Newson Brown Acoustics: Acoustics Consultant. Burohappold Engineering: Lighting Consultant, Structural Engineer, MEP. USC Capital Construction Development: Project Management. Clune Construction Company: General Contractor

Product Sources: From Top: Roche Bobois: Ottoman (Lounge). Pedrali: Lounge Chair. CB2: Side Table. Bernhardt Design: Sofa. Maharam: Sofa Fabric (Lounge), Curtain Panels (Conference Room). Oritz Custom Upholstery: Stools (Lounges). Coalesse: Table, Chairs (Conference Room). Designtex: Chair Fabric. Allied Maker: Pendant Fixture. Haworth: Workstations, Storage Units (Office Area), Tables (Booths). Teknion: Task Chairs (Office Area). Spectrum Oak: Custom Banquettes. Martin Brattrud: Custom Benches (Booths, Lounge). Resident: Pendant Fixtures (Booths). Guilford of Maine; Valley Forge Fabrics: Wall Covering. West Elm Contract: Barstools (Kitchen). ICF Group: Tables. Fornasarig: Chairs. Eureka Lighting: Pendant Fixtures. Seeley Brothers: Custom Cabinetry. Caesarstone: Countertops. Schoolhouse Electric: Cabinet Pulls. De La Espada: Side Table (Lounge). Lindstrom Rugs: Rug. Throughout: Koster Construction: Custom Metal Paneling. Opuzen: Custom Fabric. Arktura: Custom Ceiling, Wall Paneling. Stile: Wood Flooring. Tandus Centiva: Carpet Tile. Through Vista Paint: Paint. 

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

Continue reading The USC Shoah Foundation in Los Angeles by Belzberg Architects Shines Light on the Darkest Events in Modern History

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