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Tag Archives: Poland

40 Of The Best Coronavirus Related Pieces Of Street Art

Have you learned any new talents while being stuck in quarantine? How about some languages? Don’t worry if the answer is “no” – you still have plenty of time to do that as it looks like the quarantine won’t be lifted anytime soon. But while you and I are stuck at home learning Spanish on Duolingo, some artists are still out there creating amazing street art.

Graffiti artists all over the world are creating coronavirus related street art their art pieces are as accurate as they are funny. Check them out in the gallery below!

#1 Copenhagen, Denmark. Artist: Welinoo

Image source: welinoo

#2 Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Artist: Fake

Image source: iamfake

Fake says to have painted this “Super Nurse” as an ode to all healthcare professionals around the world.

#3 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Teachr1

Image source: teachr1

#4 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#5 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

“Divided We Stand, United We Fall.”

#6 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ponywave

Image source: ponywave

From the artist’s Instagram:
“We all are going through this together. There is a reason which we will see after all. It’s time to look at ourselves. Take a look at what are we doing with the planet and our lifetime. Maybe we should change our priorities? Maybe we should slow down? Maybe we should take a look around and start respect our planet and all those with whom we share it? Maybe someone is trying to hide some changes? Or economic collapse? Maybe one more step to a new world order?”

#7 Pompei, Italy. Artist: Nello Petrucci

Image source: nellopetrucciartist

#8 Berlin, Germany. Artist: EME Freethinker

Image source: Bobone2121

#9 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Artist: Aira Ocrespo

Translation from Portuguese: “Bolsonaro’s mask against the Coronavirus.”

#10 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#11 Malmö, Sweden. Artist: Richard Juggins

Image source: Richard Juggins

#12 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Rasmus Balstrøm

Image source: balstroem

Balstrøm who is originally from Denmark did this last mural before he had to flee the country.

#13 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Corie Mattie

Image source: coriemattie

#14 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#15 Miami, USA. Artist: Sean “Hula” Yoro

Image source: the_hula

#16 London, UK. Artist: Pegaus

Image source: ojc9

#17 Jindbayne, Australia. Artist: N/A

Image source: EditedThisWay

#18 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angus

Image source: angusart85

#19 Bryne, Norway. Artist: Pøbel

Image source: pobel.no

“In these challenging times, I hope this piece can be a positive contribution and spread some joy. Be safe and take care of one another.”

#20 Mumbai, India. Artist: Tyler Street Art

Image source: tylerstreetart

“Keep calm”

#21 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#22 Melbourne, Australia. Artist: Lush Sux

Translation from Chinese – “Nothing to see, carry on.”

Image source: lushsux

#23 Tartu, Estonia. Artist: Princess Täna

Image source: princess_t2na

“Living in a bubble. Just to be more ironic, a soap bubble.”

#24 Warsaw, Poland

Image source: cdn.natemat.pl

Translates to: Not every hero wears a cape. Thank you! (Translation credit: Draco Malfoy)

#25 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#26 New York, USA. Artist: Crkshnk

Image source: crkshnk

#27 United Kingdom. Artist: Gnasher

Image source: gnashermurals

#28 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#29 New York, USA. Artist: Jason Naylor

Image source: jasonnaylor

#30 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: Jilly Ballistic

#31 London, UK. Artist: N/A

Image source: Hookedblog

#32 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jeremy Novy

Image source: jeremynovy

#33 Dublin, Ireland. Artist: Subset Collective

Image source: subset

#34 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: jillyballistic

#35 Copenhagen. Denmark. Artist: Andreas Welin

Image source: Welinoo

“a-a-Achoooo!”

#36 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angusart85

Image source: angusart85

#37 London, UK. Artist: Lionel Stanhope

Image source: lionel_stanhope

#38Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jules Muck

Image source: muckrock

#39 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ruben Rojas

Image source: rubenrojas

#40 Bristol, UK. Artist: Diff

Image source: diff_artist

Aušrys Uptas

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post,Click Here! 

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I Explored The Deserted Streets Of Krakow During The Coronavirus Quarantine (18 Pics)

As of March 18th, Poland has 287 cases of coronavirus. Reacting to this, municipalities, public spaces, and other services have shut down, leaving the people to self-quarantine themselves inside their homes. Like in Budapest, the photographers set out on the streets to photograph objects in a setting that’s unusual to these often-frequented landmarks. The old town of Krakow isn’t an exception to this consequence of the pandemic.

So here it is. My Krakow today, almost without people. Get well soon, Krakow!

More info: ewaplonka.com | Facebook | Instagram

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Empty Krakow square during coronavirus pandemic.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Grodzka Street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

St. Mary’s Basilica – Florianska street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Florianska street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Basztowa street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Stolarska street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

St. Mary’s Basilica.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Sławkowska street.

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Empty Krakow Old Town During Coronavirus Pandemic

Sławkowska street.

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Continue reading I Explored The Deserted Streets Of Krakow During The Coronavirus Quarantine (18 Pics)

I Photograph Abandoned Pianos Left To Rot (36 Pics)

Around eight years ago, when I first started photographing abandoned buildings and objects, I fell in love with photographing abandoned pianos. Since then, I haven’t stopped photographing this beautiful instrument. I can honestly say that I’ve been drawn even more towards it. It’s amazing to imagine the music that would have once played in these decaying places. Pianos are so beautiful—I love their shape and how they are crafted. When I want to unwind, I always listen to piano music. It’s so relaxing, and when I know there is a piano in the building I’m photographing, it’s the first thing I run off to. It’s my favorite instrument.

The pianos in this post have been shot all over the world in different types of buildings. I’ve visited hotels, houses, castles, schools, garages, hospitals, palaces and Chernobyl to photograph them.

More info: romanrobroek.nl | Instagram

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German Sanatorium

German Sanatorium

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Conalli Kauran 2 hours agoThat is kind of terrifying actually!

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Impressive Abandoned Palace In Poland

Impressive Abandoned Palace In Poland

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Conalli Kauran 2 hours agoIf it is a palace shouldn’t the piano have legs?

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Abandoned School In Abkhazia

Abandoned School In Abkhazia

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Conalli Kauran 2 hours agoWhy couldn’t they save the piano?

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Italian Agriculture School

Italian Agriculture School

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Abandoned School In Abkhazia

Abandoned School In Abkhazia

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Cathy Coyer 28 minutes agoSame piano as number 3?

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French Castle

French Castle

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French House

French House

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German Castle

German Castle

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Belgium House

Belgium House

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Abandoned Piano

Abandoned Piano

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Cathy Coyer 22 minutes agointeresting view

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Abandoned Palace In Poland

Abandoned Palace In Poland

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Italian House

Italian House

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Italian House

Italian House

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Cathy Coyer 27 minutes agosame as number 12

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Abandoned School In Abkhazia

Abandoned School In Abkhazia

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Cathy Coyer 22 minutes agosame as 3 and 5

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German Villa

German Villa

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German Hospital

German Hospital

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Garage In Austria

Garage In Austria

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Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

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Dance Room Of A Former Bar In Germany

Dance Room Of A Former Bar In Germany

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Abandoned Villa In Germany

Abandoned Villa In Germany

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Italian Villa

Italian Villa

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Belgium House

Belgium House

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House In Austria

House In Austria

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Chernobyl

Chernobyl

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Rococo Library Built In The 18th Century

Rococo Library Built In The 18th Century

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Cathy Coyer 23 minutes agodoesn’t look abandoned at all

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Villa Built In The Late 19th Century

Villa Built In The Late 19th Century

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Belgian House

Belgian House

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Mackenzie Anderson 1 hour agoYou know sometimes I wonder how people just leave marvelous baby grands behind. Like that’s a waste of money. Even if it’s unplayable they still look bomb and can always be sold for parts.

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French Farm

French Farm

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Villa In Austria

Villa In Austria

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Cathy Coyer 23 minutes agoi think we had that tv back in the 60s

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Abandoned Castle

Abandoned Castle

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Abandoned Theater At A Huge Medical Complex

Abandoned Theater At A Huge Medical Complex

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The Living Room Of A Beautiful Abandoned House

The Living Room Of A Beautiful Abandoned House

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House In Austria

House In Austria

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Polish Palace

Polish Palace

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German Hotel

German Hotel

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German Hotel

German Hotel

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Cathy Coyer 24 minutes agosame as 35

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Poland Builds World’s Largest Snow Maze That’s Bigger Than 10 Tennis Courts

There are two ways people see winter: some see it as cold, damp, and try to spend as little time outside as possible, while others can’t wait for it to come, mainly for one thing – snow. Just think about it, snow is sort of like nature’s LEGO – you can create anything you want with it. Snowmen, snowballs, forts, and even gigantic mazes the size of 10 tennis courts! And in case you think the last one sounds oddly specific, that’s because someone actually built one.

A giant snow maze called “Snowlandia” was built in the small Polish town of Zakopane, one of Poland’s most popular skiing destinations, and you better bring a thermos – because getting out is going to take you a while.

More info: Facebook | Snowlandia

A giant snow maze was recently opened in Poland

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

50 workers took almost a month to build the maze using over 60,000 ice blocks. They even built a 16 m (52.5 ft) tall snow castle that you can enter next to it.

Snowlandia is bigger than 10 tennis courts, making it the biggest snow maze in the world

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

Over 60,000 ice blocks were used to create the maze

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

The maze is lit up with colorful lights during night time, making the whole area look almost like something from a fantasy book.

It took 50 workers over a month to build

Image credits: Dron Line

There’s even a huge snow castle you can visit next to it

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

It’s full of amazing sculptures and treasures you can explore

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

Artists from Poland and Slovakia created the sculptures to decorate both the maze and the castle. You can already begin planning your trip – Snowlandia is scheduled to open again in January 2020!

There’s even an ice throne if you’re not afraid to freeze your butt!

Image credits: Snowlandia Sniezny Labirynt

The visitors seem to love Snowlandia




Continue reading Poland Builds World’s Largest Snow Maze That’s Bigger Than 10 Tennis Courts

Polish Village Fully Covered In Colorful Flower Paintings

There is a village called Zalipie in the southeast of Poland which looks like a fairy tale brought to real life. It’s thanks to the colorful paintings of flowers which seem to be literally everywhere you look.

It all started in the 19th-century with the implementation of chimneys into houses. Before that, the smoke was supposed to come out through a hole in the ceiling, but instead was coming into the rooms, covering the walls with soot, so those often had to be whitened with lime. Chimneys helped white surfaces to remain white, so people decided to use those white walls as a canvas for flower paintings. And at some point, this flower painting spiraled out of control and engulfed the whole village, which even had the Painted Cottage Competition (Malowana Chata in Polish).

Now the painting is done and the whole village stands as an inhabited gallery, which celebrates color and nature’s beauty daily.

(h/t: mentalfloss, boredpanda)

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Image source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs – Poland

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Image source: House of Painters in Zalipie

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Image source: adamtkincaid

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Image source: polandtravel_jp

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Image source: Stuart Spicer

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Image source: Przemek Czaja

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Image source: Marcin Kelm

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Image source: yuka_7160

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Image source: ilvic

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Image source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Continue reading Polish Village Fully Covered In Colorful Flower Paintings

Puro Lodz Hotel by ASW Architekci and Superfutures Honors a Polish City’s Rich Artistic Heritage

PROJECT NAME Puro Lodz Hotel
LOCATION Poland
FIRMS ASW Architekci, Superfutures
SQ. FT. 75,000 SQF

Puro Lodz in Poland was far from an easy commission for Superfutures founder Andy Martin and ASW Architekci partners Michal Ankiersztajn, Dariusz Stankiewicz, and Jaroslaw Wronski. It had taken Martin several years to persuade the owner of Puro Hotels to let him craft the 75,000-square-foot interior of the brand’s sixth property. “We had to convince him that we could offer something different,” Martin begins.

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The snack bar’s communal table is custom. Photography by Anna Stathaki.

Once they finally got the gig, the team found itself struggling with all sorts of spatial challenges in what Martin calls an “awkward site.” Puro Lodz had a few differences of its own to offer. It stands between the neo-baroque Poznanski Palace from 1903 and a renovated late 19th-century red-brick factory now a mixed-use complex. But the hotel is also a ground-up, five-story construction, so it’s both metaphorically and spatially lodged between the city’s industrial past and its future as a hip urban playground.

That meant the building took the alinear form of a long, narrow rectangle, which, Martin says, “became one of the project’s unique qualities.” But, “It was extremely challenging from a design perspective. The common areas could be rearranged, but we were basically stuck with the footprint.” It wasn’t what he’d expected, but Superfutures made it work.

Glass pendant fixtures and ‘60’s-inspired carpet, all custom, join Verner Panton seating in the cinema bar at Poland’s Puro Rodz hotel by ASW Architekci and Superfutures. Photography by Anna Stathaki.

Martin has been running a London firm called AMA for two decades. He launched Superfutures when companies began submitting requests for pro­posals that required him to oversee the art direction of projects, and, as he puts it, “employing the necessary creatives.”

> Browse through more hospitality projects featured in Interior Design

And Puro Lodz is loaded with the work of creatives. Superfutures utilized the local artistic resources to design the hotel. Poland’s third largest city, it boasts several excellent art museums, the Herbst Palace Museum and Muzeum Sztuki among them, plus the renowned National Film School in Lodz, and the in­teriors reflect that heritage. The firm worked with Puro Hotels art advisor, Zuzanna Zakaryan, who consults on all properties, to help select the modern art. She sought out the best students and graduates from the photography department of the film school as well as area craftspeople and illustrators. “Our collection is based on a young generation of emerging artists that not only fit with the spirit of the interiors and the city but are also a good investment,” she says.

A custom concrete screen separates the lobby from the lounge. Photography by Anna Stathaki.

The seven suites feature original wall hangings by hometown weaving studio Tartaruga. Some of the 130 guest rooms feature original illustrations inspired by Lodz’s famous interwar pioneers of avant-garde art, Katarzyna Kobro and Wladyslaw Strzeminski. The lobby staircase descends alongside a cinematic mural from local illustrators Ilcat and Maciej Polak. And contemporary painting and photography, as well as vintage film posters, populate the remainder of the project.

That includes its crowning glory, Cinema Paradiso, an in-house movie theater that pays homage to Lodz’s filmmaking culture. “We pushed to get a cinema into the scheme somewhere,” Martin says. “We tried the underground garage, an external one in the forecourt, but we finally decided it would get more use inside the hotel.” The second-floor space can also function as a meeting room, with the adjoining bar area great for break-out sessions. (There’s an official conference room on the same floor.) “Hotel guests often sit in their rooms to watch TV,” the architect continues, “so the cinema is an attempt at providing social activity.”

Vintage movie posters hang in the conference room. Photography by Anna Stathaki.

Martin, who worked on the furniture selection closely with the owner, settled on a European-centric “dusting of new creative designs,” he says, to combine with his custom pieces throughout, including the chromatic 1960s-inspired carpet in the cinema and conference room. Other pieces are what he calls “visual classics” with an eye toward comfort, such as the Verner Panton bar chairs and stools upholstered in plush turquoise or blush velvet. That palette extends to some walls, coated in saturated salmon, indigo, or teal paint. Guest rooms, however, are more restrained, with furnishings by the likes of Hans Wegner and millwork in pale tones; white ceramic tile lines guest bathrooms. And reception, with its desk that morphs into a stair, is outfitted almost entirely in gray concrete.

> Check out our projects page for more design inspiration

While the hotel may honor classic elements of Polish life, it also features two restaurant concepts of today: a healthy snack bar serving smoothies and wholesome breakfasts at a long communal table and an organic bistro with a Thai vibe. There’s also a state-of-the-art spa with a view of Poznanski Palace that Martin says shouldn’t be missed. In all, it’s an interior born from substantial artistic tension and original ideas. The project’s wealth of creative talent, Martin says, “adds another layer and complexity to the experience. It put us off balance a bit—and the guests benefit.”

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

Cast-in-place concrete forms flooring in reception and treads on the stair, which leads up to the cinema and conference room. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
The coffered ceiling is also cast-in-place concrete. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
The bar’s plaster ceiling morphs into light fixtures. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
The cinema’s 26 seats were inspired by the Eames lounge chair. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
Local illustrators Ilcat and Maciej Polak spray-painted the lobby’s site-specific mural. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
ArrmetLab designed the stools and chairs in the bistro. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
The suite’s lounge chair is also by Wegner. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
A Hans Wegner chair pulls up to a suite’s custom desk. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
Leather straps secure a guest room’s cushioned headboard. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
Bathroom tile is ceramic. Photography by Anna Stathaki.
The spa’s sauna is clad in custom wooden planks. Photography by Anna Stathaki.

Project Team: Martyna Antczak-Galant; Michal Karykowski; Hanna Sawicka; Maria Swarowska:ASW Architekci. Nadia Sousa; Ben Webb; Mitch James; Kathrine H. Børresen; Adrian Jönsson: Superfutures. Atrium: Lighting Consultant. Bud-Ekspert: Structural Engineer. Elsa Projekt: Electrical Engineer. Wiso: Plumbing Engineer. Hotel Inwest Ireneusz Dudek: General Contractor.

Product Sources: From Top: Verplan: Chairs, Stools (Cinema Bar). Wenart: Custom Table (Conference Room), Side Table (Suite). Vibia: Pendant Fixtures (Reception). Arrmet: Stools (Bar), Chairs, Stools (Bistro). Caloi: Custom Chairs (Cinema). Gubi: Lamps (Suite). Carl Hansen & Søn: Chairs (Suite). Chelsom: Custom Sconce (Guest Room). Hansgrohe: Shower Fittings (Bathroom). Kvadrat: Cur­tain Material (Suite). Muuto: Cocktail Table. Moroso: Sofa. Throughout:Ege Carpets: Custom Carpet. Kasthall: Custom Rugs. ITNYS: Flooring.

> See more from the July 2019 issue of Interior Design

Continue reading Puro Lodz Hotel by ASW Architekci and Superfutures Honors a Polish City’s Rich Artistic Heritage

Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska. Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

 

An exhibition and pop-up at WantedDesign in Manhattan is spotlighting emerging Polish design, from ceramics to jewelry and even toys. Titled #PLDSGN: Up-And-Coming Designers from Poland, the exhibit is presented by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, an organization dedicated to showcasing Polish arts and culture on the international level. Throughout the exhibit, one trend is clear: a growing preference for sustainable manufacturing and the reduction of environmental impact.

Goods will be for sale at WantedDesign at the Terminal Stores in Manhattan through May 21, and at WantedDesign’s IC Store in Brooklyn from May 23 through June 13. The presentation coincides with the Institute’s launch of its Guide to Polish Design, a comprehensive online document surveying a century of Polish design. Here are five highlights from the exhibition.

Read more: Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska

Illustrator and designer Magda Pilaczynska adorns each of her porcelain dishes with spirited graphics and gilded detailing. Look at Me Plates measure 25 inches across and are equipped with a hanger, so they’re suited to walls as well as tables. Plus, each piece is unique—Pilaczynska crafts and fires each one by hand.

Photography courtesy of UAU Project.

Bubble 06 lamp by UAU Project

To sustain its goal of zero waste and zero emission, UAU Project generally makes its products to order—like this Space Age-inspired lamp, Bubble 06, which the company designed and 3D printed in recyclable bioplastic at its Warsaw studio.

Photography courtesy of ATOMY.

Bangle Bag No. 2 by ATOMY

ATOMY’s line of exclusively hand-sewn bags use only regional materials and plants, and none of it goes to waste. Take, for example, its Bangle Bag No. 2, which is handcrafted of fully organic, vegetable-tanned cowhide leather. It sports a robust wax coating for water resistance, along with a pair of circular 3D-printed handles that lend the tote its name.

Photography courtesy of bro.Kat.

Carbon jewelry by bro.Kat

Strongly influenced by its roots in Europe’s Silesia region, design collective bro.Kat forays into fashion with a new collection of carbon jewelry referencing the region’s days as a wealthy exporter of coal. It’s a project befitting the company’s name, which is both a nod to its home city of Katowice and a play on words, translating, roughly, to “black gold.”

Photography courtesy of Fenek.

Espresso cups by Fenek

At only four centimeters tall, these artisanal cups by Fenek are perfectly scaled for espresso. Handcrafted in porcelain, each features a small face—one of the Warsaw-based studio’s several hallmarks—along with quirky glazes in a range of abstract patterns. 

Read more: Q&A With WantedDesign Co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat

Continue reading Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

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