Tag Archives: Photoshoot

I Created A Photoshoot To Show The Beauty Of Spring

I am a fine art photographer and I love telling stories with my photos. Spring is one of my favorite seasons and because spring awakens so much inspiration, I created photos to show the beauty of spring.

Continue reading I Created A Photoshoot To Show The Beauty Of Spring

Inspired By A Newborn Photoshoot, This Artist Imagined How Disney Princesses And Villains Looked As Babies Interview With Artist

If you are a big fan or just love both Disney princesses and cute babies in general, we think this post might totally be your cup of tea! Why, you might ask? Well, artist Alex Pick reimagines some of the most well-known Disney characters as adorable babies, be it princesses, mermaids, or even some of the villains.

The artist was first struck with the initial idea when he stumbled upon the work of the talented photographer Karen Marie, who previously did a photo series with newborn babies dressed as Disney princesses.It wasn’t long before Alex took everything into his own hands and re-drew the said pictures in his signature Disney-like style.

Continue reading Inspired By A Newborn Photoshoot, This Artist Imagined How Disney Princesses And Villains Looked As Babies Interview With Artist

I Use Toy Cars To Do Realistic Photoshoots (10 Pics)

What happens when you have to create an advertising project about cars, but you don’t have a crew and have only toy cars (1:43 scale)?

I got a referral from Nissan to photograph model cars as if they were real. I accepted the challenge!

I really love these situations! Toy photography is special because I can do everything that is in my mind. There are no limits for these car ads! If I need snow, I make it. If I need rain, desert, streets, or anything, I can create them!

Continue reading I Use Toy Cars To Do Realistic Photoshoots (10 Pics)

I Did A Photoshoot With My Toy Hamster

I’m always looking for things to take pictures of and I have a toy hamster that I named Piper after Piper Mclean(from Heroes of Olympus). I decided to do a photoshoot with her, using a checkerboard, and and my cats. This is my first post, so sorry if it’s bad.

Continue reading I Did A Photoshoot With My Toy Hamster

Photographer’s Work Defies Traditional Gender Norms (30 Pics)

There are a lot of discussions going around today about gender norms and roles. People are beginning to defy them more and more, stepping out of their ‘traditional roles’ and being who they want to be, instead of what society expects them to be. Photographer Nir Arieli from Israel is helping defy these norms by capturing the feminine and gentle side of men.

Continue reading Photographer’s Work Defies Traditional Gender Norms (30 Pics)

For His Newborn Daughter’s Photoshoot, This Dad Recreated Famous Paintings He And His Wife Love

Photos from our early childhood can be charming because of how unprofessional, candid, and random they are, but they are usually not something people would like to frame. Nowadays, newborn photography is way more creative than just snapping a few photos of a crying baby with a camera, and many photographers specialize in capturing the first weeks of newborns’ lives in the most beautiful and cute way possible. There’s not much you can ask from a newborn to make your photos stand out, but if you think out of the box, the result can be amazing. Art became an inspiration for this cool dad from Brazil who decided to take newborn photography to another level.
He wanted to create one-of-a-kind memories from the precious first moments with his newborn daughter by recreating the most famous paintings in history that he and his wife love. At just 18 days old, a baby girl, Letícia, became an adorable mini version of some of the most iconic women ever painted—Mona Lisa, The Girl with a Pearl Earring, and Frida Kahlo, which represent different art movements like Baroque, Renaissance, and Surrealism.

Photos from our early childhood can be charming because of how unprofessional, candid, and random they are, but they are usually not something people would like to frame. Nowadays, newborn photography is way more creative than just snapping a few photos of a crying baby with a camera, and many photographers specialize in capturing the first weeks of newborns’ lives in the most beautiful and cute way possible. There’s not much you can ask from a newborn to make your photos stand out, but if you think out of the box, the result can be amazing. Art became an inspiration for this cool dad from Brazil who decided to take newborn photography to another level.

Continue reading For His Newborn Daughter’s Photoshoot, This Dad Recreated Famous Paintings He And His Wife Love

I Make Circles Out Of Cutlery And LED Lighting To Produce These 36 Spectacular Images

I love making pieces of art from cutlery using LED lights to give them some life. The spoon and fork, the cutlery that accompanies us every day in our life. Nothing special—they are hardly noticed, if at all. We only pay more attention to them when they are dirty or missing from the table. A spoon is a simple object, standardized, interchangeable. It is the perfect metaphor for people today, a symbol I took up for the first time in 2015 and that has been artistically reappearing in my works for five years now. The cutlery is lined up by the hundreds, alienated in its function as a useful object, without disguising its interchangeability and simplicity.

After the first series, I kept on this concept by producing LED-illuminated works in recent years, but I never abandoned the concept of the little spoon that takes its place in the collective. The circle is the perfect geometric shape; it stands for unity, symmetry, ideal coherence, a round thing. It symbolizes the collective, the cohesion, the strength, but also the seclusion, the rigidity, and the boundary towards everything that lies outside the radius.

Every single spoon or fork circle contains a lot of metaphors, hidden messages, and possibilities for interpretation. I leave enough space for the viewer’s perceptions, experiences, and their view of the world, which flow into the interpretation. The circle of life is static, and life is dynamic. The circles of life are both.

More info: Instagram | individualarts.at | Facebook

The classic cutlery pictures without a light effect: lots of metaphors and symbolism. Collective with 2 faces

A four-part spoon image is made up of a total of 864 spoons. The golden circles are reminiscent of an icon picture; the surface is beautiful, raised, and shines in thousands of shades of gold. Just as these circular formations can shine in the most beautiful light, they can, however, bring a different face to light in the same way in the wrong light: loud, aggressive, threatening. The same collective of spoons in two completely different forms—you only change one factor, and the overall appearance turns into the opposite.

The painting was staged with burning spray cans in a photoshoot in October 2015. The same picture can be perceived once positively and once negatively. Often, a spark is enough to trigger a fire in the area.

Material: acrylic, filler, gold and copper spray, copper patina, 860 spoons on canvas. 200 x 200, four parts.

Collective with 2 faces – detail

Performance art: Flag in the wind

Flag in the wind as a synonym of social and political developments.

Opinions change like the direction of the wind they come from; if you face the wind, you either close your eyes or turn with it. It‘s not your point of view that counts, but the comfort of being carried away and drifting.

A flag in the wind is thus another metaphor—a combination of two negatively tainted metaphors that I love to visualize. I try to combine both aspects in the form of a total work of art—not in the way of invented (half) truths in social media, but at selected locations. Loud, unmistakable, and yet still freely interpretable, I underscore the symbolic works with smoke torches or burning spray cans. The total work of art is immersed in its unique light, casts shadows, conceals some things, reinforces contours, or colors the entire picture in a dominant color.

A statement that everyone should see, and everyone who tries to understand it will possibly recognize the interplay of the chosen location, the choice of color of the smoke torches, and the painting.

Old patterns

Eight hundred sixty spoons are lined up in a row and result in a sum of concentric circles, a simple pattern to organize and structure a collective. The main thing is that the spoons keep still. Another pattern covers this collective; it gives it the note of the well-known and valued, you feel you belong, as a unit, as part of something big and worth preserving. Old patterns that work.

Material: acrylic, filler, gold and copper spray, copper patina, 860 spoons on canvas.

Old patterns – detail

70 copper

A series of assemblies with a blue copper patina. The surface may be the same, but the coloring gives each work a completely different look.

Material: acrylic, synthetic resin, gold paint and powder, copper paint, blue copper patina, chrome spray, spoons on canvas.

70 copper – detail

70 rust

These are a series of assemblages with rust coating. The surface may be the same, but the coloring gives each work a completely different look.

Material: acrylic, synthetic resin, iron powder, rust, gold paint and powder, chrome spray, spoons on canvas.

Format: 72 x 72 cm including floater frame.

70 rust – detail

Imperfection

Two concentric circles made of highly polished Berndorf stainless steel, placed on a square mirror. Perfection in shape and figure in a flawless, harmonious arrangement. Inclusion. A fork doesn‘t dance out of line, but out of line and shows its central prong. The system is perfect at first glance; the flaws only become apparent at second glance.

Material: Berndorf cutlery (cake and dining forks) on a mirror.

Imperfection – detail

Quo Vadis Europe?

Europe at the crossroads—while some reflect on the values and ideals that the idea of the European Union stands for, others drift further and further into an antiquated understanding of Europe, values, and interests. The brown rust coats the surface and the stars. Through the circle of forks, which are supposed to symbolize the unity of the Union, an unmistakable crack is formed. Quo Vadis Europe?

Material: acrylic, putty, cardboard, iron powder, rust, paint and gloss spray, gold paint and gold spray, neon paint, forks on canvas.

Tu infelix Austria

The circle of forks uses the colors of the Austrian flag, though instead of the white color stripe, a wide crack runs through the painting. The upper and lower parts move further and further away from each other. While the upper forks are still closed and correctly arranged, the lower forks are already brown, rusted, and deformed. If you are already moving away from the values and ideals that this flag stands for, you can take the opportunity to order three beers.

Material: acrylic, filler, silver and color spray, silver powder, iron powder, rust on canvas.

LED works: the interplay of contour, light, and color

My circles shine through the deliberate use of metals and metal colors, through firm contours and the play of light and shadow. Through the incidence of artificial light and daylight, the appearance and charisma of each work change. And yet, a gold picture will always shine in shades of gold and brown.

In 2017, I developed my creative concept and incorporated LED fairy lights into my works. Due to the pulsating, changing light, the painting loses its statics; it shines in all the colors of the light spectrum, the surface remains the same; the appearance changes. The spoon picture loses its rigid geometric shape and comes to life.

The works become the load-bearing element of a room. They detach themselves from the decorative components and give the surroundings their own, unmistakable note.

“Götterfunken”; “God’s spark”

The lower levels carry on three fork circles that visually merge the groove of the tines. The gold of the surface reflects the LED light effects a thousand times.
Material: acrylic, filler, chrome spray, gold paint, forks, carton, two integrated LED light chains on canvas.

“Götterfunken” – detail

Deep impression

Creative destruction—the unfinished, not yet hardened work has a tire imprint of a car, the spoons are broken, the structure of the tire runs through the entire work as a deep trace. The old construct has broken open, a new structure emerges and runs as a break through the whole piece. The LED lighting dramatizes the two surfaces unnaturally and beautifully at the same time.

Material: acrylic, synthetic resin, iron powder, rust, gold spray, gold paint and powder, spoons, 2 LED light chains, styrofoam, cardboard on canvas.

Deep impression – detail

The eye of god

Two concentric, interlocking spoon circles that simulate a human iris. The canvases stretched over it, wrapped in canvas, simulate the two eyelids. The eye begins to pulsate through LED light; it stares into the room, waking, observing, questioning.

Material: acrylic, filler, paint spray, copper oxide, copper paint, spray and powder, spoons, styrofoam, cardboard, two LED light chains on canvas.

The eye of god – detail

Fire LED works

The 2018 series again uses LED technology. The focus is not on the entire color palette of light, but on rendering the element of fire. The optical simulation of flickering flames gives the works an inner soul, the LEDs framed under the surface of the picture emit an optically warm light. The glow penetrates from the inside to the surface; the “flames” make the circles of cutlery pulsate, the static disappears, the room is immersed in a pleasant, flickering light. The pictures catch fire and come to life.

2019 and 2020 was the time to use new materials, new shapes, and modern designs. Let’s see how far the journey with forks and spoons will go in the coming years.

Deep cracks

Two rings break up the rusty filigree surface of spoon circles; underneath it, the exact image emerges, unused, shiny, metallic, and reflective. Two deep cracks cut through the total work of art diagonally; the calm is lifted, the fire screams from the deep gap that gapes through the surface.

Material: acrylic, putty, paint spray, iron powder, rust, silver paint, spray and powder, spoons, styrofoam, a circuit with 4 LED light bulbs on canvas.

Deep cracks – detail

Line of fire

The main theme of the piece’s opening and a break of rigid patterns and layers is the upper level of the work, which results from concentric circles of spoons, coated with graphite and silver paint. The lower layer emerges through two humongous, parabolic cracks—not only the surface, but the entire frame is perforated. The secretly simmering fire appears optically, the rigid spoon circle loses its visual dominance; the large crack through the collective becomes the dominant optical element.

Material: acrylic, synthetic resin, graphite, color spray, silver paint and silver powder, spoons, styrofoam, a circuit with 2 LED light bulbs on canvas.

Line of fire – detail

Born in fire

There is a hidden, golden, shimmering level, hidden under a thick layer of rust. The surface is torn open by a horizontal and vertical cut through the picture; the pieces of fabric are pulled apart diagonally towards the corners. The spoon circles emerge through the open trapezoid, in the center one, the very first spoon. The fire breathes life into the work, the spoons that draw circles around the first spoon reflect the fire effect a hundred times and pulsate with life.

Material: acrylic, synthetic resin, spray paint, iron powder, rust, gold paint, spray and powder, spoons, styrofoam, a circuit with 2 LED lightbulbs on canvas.

Born in Fire – detail

Looking up

Traunsee Altmünster, Salzkammergut, Upper Austria, July 2016

The heart of the mountain

Miesweg Traunstein, Salzkammergut, Upper Austria, January 2017

Changing politics

Viewing tower Wilhelminenberg, Vienna, August 2017

Learn from the past

Archeologic Park Carnuntum, Lower Austria August 2017

Archeologic Park Carnuntum, Lower Austria August 2017

As usual also this time with my personal fire brigade.

Old patterns

Scharnstein, Old Brewery, Salzkammergut, Upper Austria, October 2017

Looking down

Traunstein, 1691 above sea level, Salzkammergut, Upper Austria, June 2018

Wind of political change

Otto-Wagner-Sanitarium´s Church, Vienna, April 2019https://63c5adacad97124dbc6a50f53c03abf3.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Anyone can write on Bored Panda.Start writing!

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!Share on Facebook62 FollowTenneburgAuthor, Community member

Artist with home base in Vienna, Austria. Don´t take yourself and your work too serious – it makes your life the life of others much easier. Read more »

People Are Posting Their Most Embarrassing Childhood Photos (50 New Pics)

Blunder years could be described as a period in someone’s life when they thought they were different and edgy but in reality they were choosing terrible clothes and even worse haircuts.

There’s even a subreddit dedicated to it, appropriately called Blunder Years: pictures from a regrettable past. It invites people who just found their old photos not to delete them but to make amends with their former self and upload it on the Internet. And many do. Here are some of the cringiest posts the online community has to offer.

When you’re done scrolling through them, check out our earlier article about people posting their most embarrassing childhood photos.

This post may include affiliate links.#1 

2008, Senior Friend Asked Me To Prom When I Was A Freshman. My Parents Didn’t Want Me To Go But Also Didn’t Want To Forbid Me, So They Didn’t Give Me Money For A Dress Thinking That Would Stop Us. We Made Both Of Our Outfits Entirely Out Of Duct Tape For Like $30

2008, Senior Friend Asked Me To Prom When I Was A Freshman. My Parents Didn't Want Me To Go But Also Didn't Want To Forbid Me, So They Didn't Give Me Money For A Dress Thinking That Would Stop Us. We Made Both Of Our Outfits Entirely Out Of Duct Tape For Like $30

shiasurprize Report518pointsPOST

Enuya4 days ago

Wow! You had better results with just duct tape than I’d ever have even with sewing machine168ReplyView More Replies…View more comments

You might think these people are crazy for posting such photos on the Internet. However, a certain amount of self-reflection can be healthy, helping a person to become their strongest self.

Amy Morin, the author of 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do, said dwelling on the past can easily distract someone from the present. “The truth is, you never know what life would have had in store for you if you’d made a different choice,” she told Inc. “Depending on your circumstances, you may just need to give yourself permission to move forward, and then make a conscious effort to stop yourself every time you keep dwelling on the past.” That includes thinking how lame you used to look, too!#2 

It Was “Opposite Day” At School In 2005, Most People Wore Black And White Or Something.. I Decide To Dress As A Girl.. I Lived In A Small Town In Idaho. It Didn’t Go Over Well

It Was “Opposite Day” At School In 2005, Most People Wore Black And White Or Something.. I Decide To Dress As A Girl.. I Lived In A Small Town In Idaho. It Didn’t Go Over Well

awashbu12 Report514pointsPOST

Elizabeth Molloy4 days ago

I applaud your bravery!213ReplyView More Replies…View more comments

“Refusing to dwell on the past isn’t about ignoring the things that happened. Instead, it often means embracing and accepting your experiences so you can live in the present,” Morin explained. “So recognize the emotional toll that dwelling on something is taking on you, and then give yourself permission to move forward.”

To paraphrase Tyrion Lannister, never forget what you were. The rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you.#3 

I Don’t Know If I’m More Embarrassed By How Many Hours It Took Teen Me To Make This, Or That I Actually Tagged My Crush When I Posted It

I Don't Know If I'm More Embarrassed By How Many Hours It Took Teen Me To Make This, Or That I Actually Tagged My Crush When I Posted It

eehttofu Report488pointsPOST

ADHORTATOR4 days ago

Impressive!169ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#4 

My Mom Dressed Me Like This So I Was Easy To Spot When She Picked Me Up…

My Mom Dressed Me Like This So I Was Easy To Spot When She Picked Me Up...

pluckems Report474pointsPOST

brukernavn3404 days ago

Up158ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#5 

Got Dumped A Week Before Prom, But My Mom Insisted I Go Take The Pictures She Paid For, So I Made A Sock Puppet To Bring As My Date. I Regret Nothing

Got Dumped A Week Before Prom, But My Mom Insisted I Go Take The Pictures She Paid For, So I Made A Sock Puppet To Bring As My Date. I Regret Nothing

Reverend_Deek_Lovin Report465pointsPOST

Yeah, you heard4 days ago

Love this82ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#6 

My Mom Told Me Not To Blink During My 2nd Grade Class Picture

My Mom Told Me Not To Blink During My 2nd Grade Class Picture

ntaylor7746 Report431pointsPOST

Foxxy (The Original)4 days ago

Looks like this kid has seen things, disturbing things.120ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#7 

My Dad Always Thought This Haircut Looked Incredible On Me. My Mom Thought The Shirt Was Incredible. Looking Back At 2nd Grade Me Is Incredible. I’m A Female

My Dad Always Thought This Haircut Looked Incredible On Me. My Mom Thought The Shirt Was Incredible. Looking Back At 2nd Grade Me Is Incredible. I'm A Female

kikiglitz Report418pointsPOST

Elizabeth Molloy4 days ago

You look like you’re in a 1980s Spielberg film!119ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#8 

My Siblings And I Were Forced Into A ‘Pet Look Alike’ Competition. It Still Haunts Us

My Siblings And I Were Forced Into A ‘Pet Look Alike’ Competition. It Still Haunts Us

Innerbooty Report416pointsPOST

Toni4 days ago

That’s disturbing169ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#9 

In Honor Of My Husband’s 37th Birthday, I Present To You His Senior Prom Photo From 2000

In Honor Of My Husband’s 37th Birthday, I Present To You His Senior Prom Photo From 2000

Loocylooo Report404pointsPOST

Pseudo Puppy4 days ago

this…. is frikken awesome!!!139ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#10 

Tried To Smile, Channeled Jim Carrey Instead. Allllllllrighty Then

Tried To Smile, Channeled Jim Carrey Instead. Allllllllrighty Then

8b**city Report373pointsPOST

DC4 days ago

Uh … evil smile. Cool.56ReplyView more comments#11 

My Mother Said I Would Regret This Photo… No Regrets Mom! Circa 2002

My Mother Said I Would Regret This Photo... No Regrets Mom! Circa 2002

Made_lion Report366pointsPOST

chi-wei shen4 days ago

No reason for regrets, just a funny photo of a beautiful girl.130ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#12 

10m, And Looking Like A Middle Age Mom Who’s Deciding To Grace You With A Smile, While Still Judging You Just A Little

10m, And Looking Like A Middle Age Mom Who’s Deciding To Grace You With A Smile, While Still Judging You Just A Little

otusasio451 Report364pointsPOST

Elizabeth Molloy4 days ago

Your favourite Primary School teacher, who’s tough but fair.94ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#13 

‘How Did You Know I Was Gay?’ Said The Posing Seven Year Old Boy In Make Up, A Perm, And Black Sequinned Jellicle Cats Dance Costume

‘How Did You Know I Was Gay?’ Said The Posing Seven Year Old Boy In Make Up, A Perm, And Black Sequinned Jellicle Cats Dance Costume

DefinitelyNotADeer Report358pointsPOST

Scagsy4 days ago

Five hairdriers were killed during the making of this hair.152ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#14 

It’s Amazing What Growing A Beard, Growing Up, Changing Your Style And Leaving A Cult Can Do For You! (2011 vs. 2020)

It’s Amazing What Growing A Beard, Growing Up, Changing Your Style And Leaving A Cult Can Do For You! (2011 vs. 2020)

excusetheblood Report356pointsPOST

Awia4 days ago

Good job on leaving a cult. Those are always toxic.185ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#15 

My Boyfriend’s 10th Grade Picture Is Pure Rebellion. According To Him, His Mom Cried When She Received The Pictures Back

My Boyfriend's 10th Grade Picture Is Pure Rebellion. According To Him, His Mom Cried When She Received The Pictures Back

imgur.com Report349pointsPOST

Pseudo Puppy4 days ago

ohhhhh the teenage passive-aggressive rebellion is strong in this one. I totally appreciate the thought process behind this. If I was his parent, I would’ve found this hilarious.117ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#16 

Ten Years And One Transition Later: Some Things Never Change

Ten Years And One Transition Later: Some Things Never Change

reddit.com Report346pointsPOST

chi-wei shen4 days ago(edited)

There is no reason to ditch Mario, no matter what’s your age or gender.129ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#17 

Had A “Photoshoot” With My Mom And Thought That Being “The Weird Kid” Made Me Cool And Mysterious

Had A "Photoshoot" With My Mom And Thought That Being "The Weird Kid" Made Me Cool And Mysterious

Dinkelburger123 Report344pointsPOST

Pseudo Puppy4 days ago

that’s one good lookin’ guy…. (swap the leather coat for a plain black leather coat, & it’d be classic). Please tell me you took these to a legit modelling agency. Because jacket-choice aside, you could’ve got a contract.207ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#18 

My Family Looking Like An Ll Bean Catalog Submission, And Then There’s 15 Year Old Me

My Family Looking Like An Ll Bean Catalog Submission, And Then There's 15 Year Old Me

Floridaasf**k Report334pointsPOST

Andrew Gibb4 days ago

like the spirit of a deceased ancestor turning up for the photo170ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#19 

Found My High School ID This Morning

Found My High School ID This Morning

dial6664satan Report329pointsPOST

Daria Z4 days ago

Ha, it looks cool 😀46ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#20 

My All-Time Favorite Picture Of My Husband. He Was 20 In This Picture. Posting With His Reluctant Permission

My All-Time Favorite Picture Of My Husband. He Was 20 In This Picture. Posting With His Reluctant Permission

geekoutfreakout69420 Report322pointsPOST

Kady Maree Mcgrath4 days ago

It’s like business at the front party at the back but in the picture it’s party at the top business at the bottom79ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#21 

Husband? Dead. Emotion? Devastated. Insurance Money? Cashed. Eyebrows? Don’t Need Them

Husband? Dead. Emotion? Devastated. Insurance Money? Cashed. Eyebrows? Don’t Need Them

Dracoco Report319pointsPOST

Julie Lemaire4 days ago

OMG you are Carmelita Spats from A Serie of Unfortunate Events !!84ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#22 

12 Years Ago. Teenage Pregnancy. Our First Family Photo

12 Years Ago. Teenage Pregnancy. Our First Family Photo

enbeay Report312pointsPOST

Elizabeth Molloy4 days ago

You guys look like fun!121ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#23 

School Photo Looking Like 60-Year Old Librarian With My Cardigan, Turtleneck And Thick Glasses Date And Age Unknown

School Photo Looking Like 60-Year Old Librarian With My Cardigan, Turtleneck And Thick Glasses Date And Age Unknown

Al_E77 Report303pointsPOST

Elizabeth Molloy4 days ago

Bunny buttons!133ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#24 

My Mother Found This Photo Of My Church Friend (Ryan Gosling) And I. We Had Some Awful 90s Hairs Cuts

My Mother Found This Photo Of My Church Friend (Ryan Gosling) And I. We Had Some Awful 90s Hairs Cuts

Talisintiel Report285pointsPOST

Kady Maree Mcgrath4 days ago

He looks like Draco Malfoy170ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#25 

When I Was 14 I Was Dating A Girl From Another High School. I Decided To Surprise Her On Her Birthday By Dressing Up As A Clown And Busting Into Her Classroom Singing “Happy Birthday”. She Was Mortified! When The Dust Settled She Thankfully Realized The Thoughtfulness That Went Into The Gesture

When I Was 14 I Was Dating A Girl From Another High School. I Decided To Surprise Her On Her Birthday By Dressing Up As A Clown And Busting Into Her Classroom Singing “Happy Birthday”. She Was Mortified! When The Dust Settled She Thankfully Realized The Thoughtfulness That Went Into The Gesture

1doublezero Report277pointsPOST

Vic4 days ago

That’s a bold move..105ReplyView more comments#26 

8th Grade Me Thought I Was The [Coolest], Went Like This To A Christian Concert Event

8th Grade Me Thought I Was The [Coolest], Went Like This To A Christian Concert Event

mastermoto7321 Report270pointsPOST

Scagsy4 days ago

It’s the feather boa that really make it though103ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#27 

I Was That Girl

I Was That Girl

Gotholotls Report264pointsPOST

Devon W4 days ago

I would dye my hair like that now if I was brave enough74ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#28 

In High School I Went Through A Belt Phase. For Some Reason, I Thought The More Belts I Had On, The Cooler I Looked. I Later Discovered… That Was A Lie

In High School I Went Through A Belt Phase. For Some Reason, I Thought The More Belts I Had On, The Cooler I Looked. I Later Discovered... That Was A Lie

JustSherlock Report264pointsPOST

Clavelle4 days ago

When you have that many awesome belts, how could you choose just one?94ReplyView more comments#29 

They Seem To Bring A Smile To Your Face. Hope This Makes Your Day A Little Better. I Present, Me As A Kid

They Seem To Bring A Smile To Your Face. Hope This Makes Your Day A Little Better. I Present, Me As A Kid

zwaymire Report259pointsPOST

Lauren Caswell4 days ago

Any fruit pies?29ReplyView more comments#30 

Me At 17(2010) Living It Up In Vegas

Me At 17(2010) Living It Up In Vegas

pelirojo67 Report249pointsPOST

Hans4 days ago

Reposting this image will not help you….162ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#31 

Me, On My 8th Birthday, Getting The DS I Raved About

Me, On My 8th Birthday, Getting The DS I Raved About

reddit.com Report249pointsPOST

Toni4 days ago

dat teef84ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#32 

Growing Up In Detroit When Eminem Came Out Yeaaaaaah…

Growing Up In Detroit When Eminem Came Out Yeaaaaaah...

mike70wu Report241pointsPOST

Tee4 days ago

I’m Slim Shady, yes I’m the real Shady All you other Slim Shadys are just imitating So won’t the real Slim Shady please stand up Please stand up, please stand up?82ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#33 

14 Year Old Me Photoshopping Out My Dad For Britney Spears. This Is Just So Toxic

14 Year Old Me Photoshopping Out My Dad For Britney Spears. This Is Just So Toxic

heymanmaniac Report232pointsPOST

Enuya4 days ago

Still better photoshop skills than one can see on some so-called ‘influencers’ profiles.206ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#34 

Me At Age 15, Channeling My Inner 30something Business Woman

Me At Age 15, Channeling My Inner 30something Business Woman

treslilbirds Report228pointsPOST

JuJu4 days ago

“Well Brenda, of course we can talk again about the second fireplace. I’m sure I have EXACTLY the house you are looking for. Just let me check my list…”85ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#35 

As Most People Thought My Fiancé Last Photo Was Not A Blunder, I Present To You Her College Library Card – 2003

As Most People Thought My Fiancé Last Photo Was Not A Blunder, I Present To You Her College Library Card - 2003

Jambohh Report221pointsPOST

Daria Z4 days ago

That’s what I would have worn if I was braver back then 🙂36ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#36 

Dwight Schrute Glasses? Check. Braces? Check. Turtle And Cat As Only Friends? Check. Braided Rat Tail With Beads? Zoom In…

Dwight Schrute Glasses? Check. Braces? Check. Turtle And Cat As Only Friends? Check. Braided Rat Tail With Beads? Zoom In...

Pizzarazzi Report220pointsPOST

Zophra4 days ago

Ah, the cat looks like it’s trying to escape from you…35ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#37 

I Was In An Early 2000’s Transitional Phase Between Awkward And Total Embarrassment

I Was In An Early 2000's Transitional Phase Between Awkward And Total Embarrassment

PigSlug Report218pointsPOST

Mark4 days ago

Clown somewhere looking for his trousers!49ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#38 

Well I’m 34 Now. Still Into Model Rockets Though

Well I'm 34 Now. Still Into Model Rockets Though

MiniDriver Report217pointsPOST

Clavelle4 days ago

I very much appreciate this picture! I hope its framed and up on a wall somewhere!55ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#39 

I’m Glad My Looks Didn’t Peak At Age 13. (Not A Costume. God Help Me, I Really Dressed Like That)

I’m Glad My Looks Didn’t Peak At Age 13. (Not A Costume. God Help Me, I Really Dressed Like That)

vrnkafurgis Report210pointsPOST

Enuya4 days ago

Hey, half of the problem were glasses. I know from own experience how big difference flattened lenses and a well-chosen frame of glasses may do.82ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#40 

My Childhood Was Destined To Be A Rough One…

My Childhood Was Destined To Be A Rough One...

ThunderousDong Report209pointsPOST

DKS 0014 days ago

and now he’s someone’s upper management boss84ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#41 

Freshman College, ‘94: Control Yourselves, Ladies

Freshman College, ‘94: Control Yourselves, Ladies

Warshok Report204pointsPOST

Tovah Roche4 days ago

He looks like he’s headed to Silicone Valley to start his own tech company.63ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#42 

Hawaii Wasn’t Ready For My Ice Cold Sister And I In 2003

Hawaii Wasn’t Ready For My Ice Cold Sister And I In 2003

mrspetie Report201pointsPOST

Tee4 days ago

Spy Kids!58ReplyView more comments#43 

Mom Found This Recently, Me At 18, My Reaction When She Showed Me Was “God Damn What Is That Creature”

Mom Found This Recently, Me At 18, My Reaction When She Showed Me Was "God Damn What Is That Creature"

stemid85 Report193pointsPOST

Toni4 days ago

the “now” picture would be interesting..118ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#44 

My Outfit During A Snowfall In May 2004

My Outfit During A Snowfall In May 2004

Articado Report192pointsPOST

Lauren Caswell4 days ago

You look middle aged, what?! XD66ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#45 

2002, Age 14. I Have No Idea What I Was Rebelling Against But I Was Going At It Hard

2002, Age 14. I Have No Idea What I Was Rebelling Against But I Was Going At It Hard

Dishyphus Report190pointsPOST

glowworm24 days ago

Loving the squirrel shirt!36ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#46 

My Junior Year Yearbook Picture

My Junior Year Yearbook Picture

gamerskaterchef Report184pointsPOST

Isabella Stoevsand4 days ago

you are… the last Airbender. I am so sorry Aang.52ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#47 

Sophomore Year Of High School, I Would Show Up Like This And Hang Out Behind The Library With My Little Edgy Kids Group

Sophomore Year Of High School, I Would Show Up Like This And Hang Out Behind The Library With My Little Edgy Kids Group

ChaloPerea98 Report177pointsPOST

glowworm24 days ago

Amazing! I’m surprised you were allowed to wear the “bloody” T-shirt to school though.75ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#48 

My Parents On Their Second Date!

My Parents On Their Second Date!

majestyyy_ Report167pointsPOST

Crissy Brandt4 days ago

Your parents are very high.151ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#49 

Every Time My Friend Moves, She Rediscovers This Gem From Middle School

Every Time My Friend Moves, She Rediscovers This Gem From Middle School

Jaylee9000 Report154pointsPOST

Sent From The Slytherin House4 days ago

I laughed sooo hard at this!33ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#50 

I Was A Cute Little Girl, Except For The Fact That I’m A Guy

I Was A Cute Little Girl, Except For The Fact That I'm A Guy

Frendian Report152pointsPOST

Pseudo Puppy4 days ago

ah, the cliche of gender-signalling identifiers. You were cute. end of story. 🙂64ReplyView More Replies…View more comments

Note: this post originally had 196 images. It’s been shortened to the top 50 images based on user votes.

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!324 Rokas LaurinavičiusWriter, BoredPanda staff

Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 235 million people have read the posts he’s written, which is probably more than he could count to.

For This International Women’s Day, I Got 12 Men To Crush Stereotypes Of Masculinity With My Photoshoot

I am an artist from Lithuania, and together with my friend, we invited twelve men of diverse ages, social classes, and sexual orientations to be photographed nude with beautiful floral arrangements to celebrate International Women’s Day. The project aims to highlight the vulnerability of men and stereotypes associated with masculinity that are harmful not just to men, but women, too.

On March 8, it is often said that women are like flowers—beautiful, gentle, and delicate. We hope that this year, men can also bloom—open up and reveal their vulnerabilities, showing that they are not afraid to be fragile and sensual. Men suffer disproportionately from psychological problems because society teaches them to be emotionless, solve everything by themselves, not ask for help, and just keep silent. We chose this “feminine” day for the project because we wanted to go deeper and talk about something important for the wellbeing of men and society as a whole. After all, it’s essential to have good and healthy men in our lives.

In our society, men are told they must be the provider of the family and exhibit strong, stoic qualities. While these are not bad qualities on their own, the pressure to always be perfect and never falter is harmful to the male psyche. “Manly” professions are more dangerous and high-risk not just physically, but psychologically as well. Men are also more likely to be victims of violent crime. That is why it’s so essential to create a safe space for open dialogue and allow men to show their vulnerability—that they are searching and don’t always know everything.

Twelve bright and vivid photos show everyday heroes as well as celebrities like four-time “World’s Strongest Man” Žydrūnas Savickas and Paralympic rower Augustas Navickas. Each picture is accompanied by answers to three questions that help us see a side of them that is often invisible. Men describe their relationships with their fathers and their attitudes towards their bodies, recount the last time they cried, and why.

“These twelve interviews strengthened my belief in the transformational power of open discussions and listening. These men were very grateful for the conversations that inspired them to consider some important questions about themselves that their daily routines often prevented them from considering. Even a few wives expressed their support and gratitude because they felt their husbands changed. They became more open, and their family relationships improved. That is why I already feel in my heart that this project has made a big difference,” notes artist Neringa Rekašiūtė.

“In this age of women, it is important not to leave men behind. Our whole society must grow—not just parts of it. In countries where gender equality is more prominent, male suicide rates are lower—everybody benefits. From whatever angle you look at it, our similarities are greater than our differences. I could see men’s eyes light up during the shoot and I can tell you that we all just want to be seen,” adds Edita Mažutavičiūtė, the co-author of the project.

Augustas, Paralympian, 29

When was the last time you cried?

I was training in Italy a few years back—I was rowing in the open sea with the seatbelt holding me attached to the boat. The waves turned the boat over and I ended up under it. I couldn’t reach the surface—I panicked terribly. Finally, I realized that I needed to unfasten my seatbelt and swim out. That moment when I got the first breath of air… I can’t describe it. This was the most terrifying incident of my life, even more so than my spine injury. This year, before the world championship, my Belorussian friend flipped over and drowned. His wife was left alone with the kids. It was a difficult period, mainly fully understanding what he went through since I experienced it myself. Then, in November, in Hong Kong, we swam into the open sea. At first, it was calm—we were rowing alongside the harbor. Then we made a turn and two-meter waves started crashing at us. I was in unknown territory, a new boat, and I kept asking myself “what am I doing here?” It was horrifying, and the previous experience of drowning kind of magnified the fear. My eyes were full of tears when we finished the distance. Now, whenever there are waves, my concern is back. I have to face it every single time.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

We’re close. We got closer after my injury—at that time, I was spending a lot of time in rehab in Palanga, and he lives in Klaipėda, so we used to meet all the time. He helped me so much. He’s still very supportive—he comes to cheer for us whenever he can make it. My values changed after the spine injury—I used to be very irresponsible, making a lot of money and spending it all. I’ll be 30 soon, but sometimes I feel older than my 50-year-old dad.

What’s your relationship with your body?

It felt natural to undress for a nude photoshoot. And when I got the invitation, I thought that it’s a great and important topic. My body changed so much after the injury—I needed a lot of time to get used to seeing myself in a wheelchair. When I started dating my wife Ema, people used to stare at us while we were holding hands in public places. But we don’t care anymore. My wife was a huge help. She always tells me that she sees me, not the wheelchair.

Mindaugas, businessman, 41

When was the last time you cried?

I’m not made of wood, so I’m sensitive to a lot of stuff. I cry and I’m not ashamed of it. However, I don’t weep publicly, and I try not to do it in front of children. My daughter has certainly seen me crying, and that’s not a tragedy at all, but I still want to protect my kids from it. I cried a month ago—a few of my businesses went under and my health was terrible, so I was in a bad place. I’m coming back to life now.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My dad’s 86. He’s very old-fashioned, yet he’s undoubtedly a fantastic person—he knows how not to care about the little things and takes a light-hearted approach to life. Perhaps that’s exactly why he’s full of energy and vitality. Our experience was never easy; there was a lot of physical labor in the countryside. My brother keeps in touch with dad much more than I do, but my brother has a stronger connection to his ancestors and roots. He recently bought an apartment and then found a picture of our grandad standing in front of that very house. During the interwar period, it used to be a military school, and our grandad was a student there, hiding it from everybody—he had to in those days. Later, we understood why grandad always used to sing the Lithuanian anthem in privacy.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was a short, fat kid, always eating too many cutlets that my mom used to make. Then I kind of stretched out, turned into a lanky teenager, and started doing sports. My mom didn’t let me work out a lot due to my asthma. When I started my first family, I weighed 120 kilos and I used to drink so much alcohol back in those days. I decided to stay dry for two years. Yet my weight kept changing rapidly because of my emotional state. Now, I’m doing tai-chi. I do believe that our exterior reflects what’s happening inside. You don’t need to have a six-pack, that’s an extreme, but you simply must keep moving.

Zigmas, writer, 28

When was the last time you cried?

I appreciate my solitude, yet I can only imagine living and creating when communicating with the people around me. It’s communication that brings out the truth and provides a reality check about whoever you think you are. It’s easy to be good and good-looking for yourself, but it’s a whole other thing to meet people and have life “happen” to you. Life is worth the tears, not death. Death only finishes sentences and tells us what it was. “Now it’s this,” death says. It doesn’t mean no. That’s why we cry—because of interactions with others, through pain, hopelessness, disappointment, epiphanies, or moments of clarity. Hope can make us mistaken, and we’re bound to lie to ourselves or others when it eventually happens.
The last time I wept was around a week before writing these very words. I remembered that love couldn’t make people happy. It can inspire, give energy, make the days colorful; however, it just can’t make us happy. I can’t expect my love to change other people, to make them act in a way that I’d like them to.
My grandpa is now 95. During difficult moments, he used to tell us, “don’t cry; there’s no one to wipe your tears.” And it’s not like he thought it was indecent or inappropriate to sob; he just believed that crying requires a particular understanding and a touch from other people. Men often cried in his stories; I don’t even know when they stopped. Perhaps 50 years back.
It’s hard to face a man crying. It seems so terrifying and painful to the ones around. Inconsolable. Even insulting at times. Life-shattering. That’s probably why it’s so unneeded and undesired by many.
And most men would prefer not to cry—they’d like to remain heroes, immovable rocks. They’d like to be the ones to console others, to protect everyone, to spread joy, and accept responsibility. And that’s great, that’s beautiful. But that’s not a given.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My father was an alcoholic. And he almost took my life, too. He killed himself when I was a kid. I blamed myself for it for some time, and I was a bit happy as well when he was gone. Finally, I realized that I couldn’t justify all of my hardships and decisions using childhood traumas—I have to be responsible for who I am today and where I’m going. I can only be thankful for what happened in the past. Sometimes, when I feel misunderstood, when I’m unlucky, and the only solution seems to be to run away from everything and everyone when I’m disappointed in myself and the world, I do feel my father breathing over me. His northern, wolf-like breath reminds me that there’s still a lot of his anxiety, sadness, destruction, blood in me.
However, I don’t have to be a victim because of this. I’m not sure that we’re meant to learn from such mistakes and bad examples, or that a bad childhood is a useful experience. It wasn’t. But it taught me that growing up without a dad means doing everything yourself: fixing your first bike or car, painting walls, taking care of the roof, unclogging the chimney, or building a greenhouse. You also have to create relationships yourself, as well as rituals, habits, and your perception of others.
Overall, I think Lithuania lost its traditions of masculinity during the Soviet era. Before that, people used to respect their fathers so much more. It was almost a sacred relationship, but we looked at our dads during the Soviet years and saw nothing we could appreciate. That regime turned every man into a small bolt in a big machine, in a world where everything was given and decided, where no one could say a more powerful word, and where your spine and responsibility weren’t needed. Masculinity was suffocating; it mutated into a lukewarm bowl of nothing. Sure, there were exceptions, but this tendency forced us to reinvent the thing we used to call fatherhood, to show our kids what’s beautiful and admirable about it. This process is full of marvel and possibilities. Still, the biggest challenge is not to fall into hibernation, not to “go with the flow” of emotions and impulses, ignoring misunderstandings and everything else. We need to bring out the honesty and pride in this, gentleness and power, and build ourselves responsibly.

What’s your relationship with your body?

My body is like an instrument to me—it gets its value and beauty by how it’s used, what melodies I play with it. And yes, my body is an equal part of my personality, changing with the ways I live my life and with my thoughts. It expresses the things hidden within me through the wrinkles in my smile, the curvature of my back, through burns and calluses, and whatever else you might think of. It allows me to feel closeness and warmth, taste, smell, exhaustion, and many other things. Yet it’s great to keep reminding myself every day that I’m more than just a body. In general, male nudity looks so direct and straightforward to me, no mysteries at all, no excitement or secrets. It seems more insolent than tempting—material, routine, clear. I don’t believe that being nude is an expression of freedom or a source of inspiration since, most of the time, everything is still deep inside.

Žydrūnas, 4x World’s Strongest Man, 44

When was the last time you cried?

Everyone cries—kids, grownups, men, and women. I allow myself to do it, but I don’t cry that often. When I’m unlucky, or someone hurts me, it kind of motivates me to move forward, focuses me. I treat things like that as valuable and necessary lessons. Around ten years ago, I had more negative emotions in me, more anger towards others and myself. I learned how to understand others and not to hope that everyone would behave the way I’d like them to. I don’t know what I’d do in another person’s place, do I? So I shouldn’t judge.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

Today marks three years since he passed away. I remember flying in from the USA for his funeral. His death wasn’t an expected one, because he had an operation—I was visiting him almost every day for two months, and then he got better. I flew away without saying goodbye to him… My dad was my idol: he was a strong person with a great sense of humor. And his dad, my grandfather, shaped my values—he was extremely hard working and was continually showing everyone that anything can be achieved if you try hard enough. Grandpa was a very healthy man, and he was upset with people who drank or smoked. He could build anything he liked—a boat, a tractor, he even had parts to build a plane. But he ran out of time. Perhaps examples like these showed me that nothing is impossible. When I was 10, I wrote in my diary that I’d become the champion of football, ice hockey, and bodybuilding. I was always a dreamer.

What’s your relationship with your body?

My body is essential to me. It’s what I work with. I do everything with my body, but the main things always start in my head—visions, aims, and motivation. I love and cherish my body so that it can serve me longer. I want to make it a better home for my soul. Nudity is nothing special to me; I don’t think about it. You don’t shower dressed, so you want to swim in a lake nude, too. My take on this was shaped by life in the countryside, in nature. I spent my childhood in forests, rivers, snow, and parks. I was a part of nature, and my clothes, just like asphalt or other human-made objects, were something that separated people.

Gerardas, waiter, 22

When was the last time you cried?

A few weeks ago, actually. I came back from work and cried because I was lost, I was alone, and my mom’s an alcoholic… It all just burst out of me. I have problems expressing my emotions, especially the sadness inside. I should cry more often.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

I don’t have a dad. He met my mom in Palanga and they had a summer affair. Mom got pregnant, and dad went back to his family. He even offered mom some money for an abortion. I’ve never met him. Some time ago, I found a tiny picture of him online. I zoomed in and noticed that he has the same hair. So that’s one good thing I got from him—beautiful hair. If I ever have my own family, I’ll do everything I can to be a good father. But I need to learn everything; I need to learn how to be a man.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was glad to hear that we would be naked for this. I can’t understand why a man has to be gay if he moves well. Why can’t men just enjoy their bodies and express them? I appreciate nudity. As a teenager, I used to run to the barbershop every time I noticed a curly hair on my head—I wanted to shave it all off and look like a proper geezer. Today, I’m a whole different person.

Matthew, dancer, 23

When was the last time you cried?

The last time I cried was a couple of days ago. I had broken up with my partner/best friend, and it was hard because I had to fully let go of someone who I loved even more than myself. We needed to have time to heal and think before coming back to each other, but we’ll see each other soon.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My relationship with my father is very neutral. I don’t hate him, and I don’t utterly love him. He’s not a man of many words, and most times, neither am I. I admire his resilience and his drive. He’s a smart man who’s lived a colorful life. I’d like to think that I take after him in more ways than one! I resent him for being absent for a great deal of my life. It left me wondering if he cared for his only son or not.

What’s your relationship with your body?

It took a long, long, long, long time for me to become a fan of my body. I used to hate taking my shirt off, so much that I would go to the beach in a full tracksuit. Now, I’m so aware of how beautiful I am that I want to be able to show it in any way I choose. I love nudity—in fact, almost all the shoots I’ve done recently have been nude! I think it’s such an important part of being one with yourself; being able to accept all parts of your body, large, small, wide, narrow, tall, short, EVERYTHING!

Kasparas, business development officer, 36

When was the last time you cried?

I went to Kino Deli along with a bottle of gin punch to see Almodóvar’s film. I was crying with laughter, but also because it hurt inside. I didn’t sob after the breakup with my girlfriend, which was fairly brutal, but I always tear up when watching videos about nature and Africa, especially when I’m hungover.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My parents split up when I was six. Mom took two sons, built a house with her own hands, and raised us. My grandad was a person I admired when I was little—he got up early in the morning to boil water for his long shave. One has to have inner peace to shave like that. I liked his “gentleman’s code of conduct.” In our family, the men don’t pee standing up due to the respect for their women. My grandad and uncles used to wash their socks and underpants. I’ve never seen any toxic masculinity s**t, only respect. When I was a kid and felt ill, I remember my grandad carrying me around in his arms and singing. After he died, I asked my grandma to give me his razor.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I had a few complexes here and there before, but now I just don’t give a s**t. I have a dad bod and I’ve raised a kid on my own! However, I took part in carrying fridges when I was helping someone recently—I realized I do need to get in better shape. Just for myself, to be more durable. Apart from that, I see all cons as pros, all insufficiencies as advantages. I like that people in my circle are unique: they work in car repair shops, shoot guns, go to tanning salons, pierce their ears with crystal earrings, and go to dancing classes. So what? You can be anyone you’d like to be! That’s self-expression!

Margiris, journalist, 27

When was the last time you cried?

I was watching a movie about my sister, Rūta Meilutytė, and I teared up because it reminded me of her victory in the London Olympics. At that time, I was watching the competition in the city, and when she won, I started crying my heart out. I was walking through city streets and weeping.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

A bit complicated, to be honest. But today I’m much less angry and much more trustful. To be less bitter was a conscious decision of mine since anger only brought more pain to those around me. I decided to keep my dad’s good qualities and reject the bad traits, which I notice in myself as well. I see my reflection in my dad. I don’t blame him today for not being there when I was growing up—I understand that times were difficult for him and he had to work so much to support his kids and parents as well. My dad taught me how to read, how to notice injustice and oppose it, and how to be truthful.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I know my body. Perhaps I’m not entirely happy with it, but we’re in synergy. In the teenage years, it was awkward as a guy to appear nude in front of a girl to show her your penis, since you’re not yet sure how it works either. But then one time, my friends and I went skinny-dipping in the sea; no one said anything, and it became so much easier to undress.

Audrius, border guard, 47

When was the last time you cried?

My daughters say they have a very sensitive dad. I don’t know why—perhaps I used to read a lot, and life in the countryside did its thing. My friends were dogs, cats, and nature in general. I saw animals being born all the time, and I felt it all inside.
I was chopping wood at my parents’ property recently. All the fields and meadows around it—all the land my dad and I worked on, our house that used to be there, the garden. I saw a hill that used to look so huge when I was little—my dad made me skis and put the ends of those skis into a tub so those ends would curl up. He gave me a push and I skied down that hill hearing him cheering, “go, go, go!” I cried remembering that, because when you’re standing on your land, oh boy, can you feel it all going right through your soul.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

He was a big storyteller and a great fisherman. It wasn’t appropriate to hug that much back in those days. But I remember him buying a scooter. We called it “the pig.” He said he’d drive to school with it (my dad was a teacher), but we knew he bought it to go fishing. So I was around six years old, and we were coming back home from fishing. It got dark and cold, and a rainstorm started. I felt safe hugging my dad—it felt like a wall was protecting me. I miss this feeling, and I want to make my family feel safe like I was. I want to be that wall to my daughters and wife.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was a tall kid, a typical basketball player. My friends and I used to try to gain weight and get bulkier during my teenage years. Arnold Schwarzenegger was our idol. I always loved sports, even though I didn’t have a place to exercise.
I remember jumping into small ponds as a kid in the spring, just after the ice melted. We didn’t want to get our clothes wet, so we were all nude.
Sometimes my wife and I talk about growing old, but we’re not afraid of our bodies aging.

Martynas, tattoo artist, 29

When was the last time you cried?

During my wedding at the Burning Man festival. I didn’t cry when saying my vows since I had rehearsed them many times, but when Aistė, my wife, said hers, I broke down. I used to sob a lot more, especially when I was studying at a university in London. It was a dark and depressing time—I had a job I hated just so I could survive, and I was freshly divorced. I felt utterly alone, so I cried because of that. It taught me to be on my own, yet I also realized that human connection is of utmost importance to me. The emptiness goes away when you’re with someone. But I do regularly tear up when I see movies or ads about dogs. I never keep it inside.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

Much like many folks, I have a superficial relationship with my father. When I was a kid, my dad chose his career over parenthood—I was financially secure, which I’m thankful for. But I never kicked a ball with him or shot some hoops. I can’t remember us spending any quality time together, ever. I don’t want this to be the case when I’m a father myself.
Today I feel like the amount of time he spent with me then is precisely as much I want to communicate with him now. We only talk about cars and material stuff—it’s not like we have a strong bond.
I’ve noticed that people of my generation get on with their grandparents much better. Maybe it’s due to the grandparents being born in the interwar years, in a free Lithuania, so their values align with the ones of their grandchildren. I’m always eager to see my grandma—we have a more sincere relationship, and I realize that this won’t last forever, so I appreciate it more.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I hated my body before—I used to feel like I was too skinny in some places and also fat in others. But when the tattoos came, my body became beautiful to me. I’m in a constant process of creating it, much like how people who do sports look at it. It wasn’t hard to pose nude at all.

Reinaldas, food stylist, 31

When was the last time you cried?

I cry very rarely, and not because it’s deemed “unmanly.” I like to cry because then your hormones balance out. But I used to cry from stress and pressure pretty recently when I was working too much. It used to happen on my way to work. I had to be at a movie set at 6 am, start making food at 9 am, and shoot at 1 pm, and then repeat it all many times over. I used to say to myself: “God, will I make it? What am I doing here…”
The last time I cried was in summer when I split up with my boyfriend. I felt sad for our home, dog, seven years together—which is so long in gay years! I wept for a bit, felt terrible for myself, and it was over. It was pretty normal crying for an unconventional man.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

It used to be terrible. My dad was a typical guy; he showed zero emotions; however, when he felt the pressure and burst out, we all felt it. I’m 30 today and my dad has already softened up; he even cried about the bad things he had done before. We have a good relationship now—he comes to visit me and gets to know my boyfriends. He had to change a lot for us to be here today. The big break came when I came out to him. It was Easter and we were watching a TV show with homophobic jokes about hanging gay people. I felt irritated and went out for a smoke. My dad saw that something was wrong, so he followed me outside. I asked him whether he wanted to know what the matter was because he might need to hang me. He cried but didn’t try to “talk me out of it.”
However, the news that I was seeing a psychotherapist was a bigger shock to him. He was probably afraid that this might change our relationship, that I might start blaming him for stuff. But the situation changed for the better when he began dating a psychologist. Now, we all go out for dinner—my boyfriend, my dad, his girlfriend, and me. I think my father is afraid to be alone, so he simply had to change his outlook.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I’m now as heavy as I’ve ever been—I’m also as happy as I’ve ever been. I’m a housewife since I work much less at the moment. And I also have a superpower—I can make absolutely any food I think of. We sit at home binging some series, and suddenly I feel the urge to have cinnamon buns. And so I just make them! And god, do I love dried ham. But I feel good about my body. I do like handsome people, but I prefer people that are truly alive.
I was once very skinny—I felt pretty, but weak. Now I’m overweight. Someone sent me a photo from a movie set—my gut was hanging out, and my dewlap… Yuck. But then I get to rest, sleep a bit more, and I feel better about myself again.

Benediktas (name changed), soldier, 24

When was the last time you cried?

During my uncle’s funeral. Family is the most important thing for people in my circle, and everyone supports everyone. I could never understand how brothers or other relatives don’t talk to each other. I can be mad at my relatives, sure, argue with them passionately, but we’re all like a single, united fist.
At that funeral, my aunt asked me to invite everyone for a mourning meal. But when I saw my uncle being buried, I couldn’t speak—my eyes were full of tears and my voice broke down. I’m not sure that anyone understood what I said. There’s no shame in crying, but I wouldn’t do it in front of strangers—I wouldn’t like them to see me during this tender, painful moment. When I’m alone or surrounded by loved ones—sure, that’s why we have tear glands.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My father is an honest, upstanding man. He didn’t achieve anything significant since he always had a simple job and had no big ambitions, but in some aspects, he was still a hero of mine. I learned from him, especially how to be a man and a decent person in general. If he engages in something, he fully commits to it, he does a perfect job and looks to fulfill the needs of others as well. He’s respected by everyone, from local homeless people to professionals in high positions. He showed me how to love a woman. My mother is like a match sometimes, she ignites real fast, but dad listens to her in silence patiently and then does whatever needs to be done. Today, my dad is my friend.

What’s your relationship with your body?

Overall, I love my body. It gives me no trouble at all. I always did what I wanted to do, never going to the gym, and still eating what I desire. My guy friends were telling me that I look good while they were working out all the time and weren’t happy with the results. I do see some flaws in how I look, sure, but I believe it’s all part of psychology—we need to change the way we think, not the way we look.

Continue reading For This International Women’s Day, I Got 12 Men To Crush Stereotypes Of Masculinity With My Photoshoot

Athletes With Down Syndrome Share Their Dreams Through A Photoshoot

My son Will was fascinated with the game of tennis at the early age of three. Will has Down syndrome and I could not find an adaptive tennis program for him so, I created one. Buddy Up Tennis is an organization that creates opportunities for individuals with Down syndrome to play, learn, grow through tennis, fitness and our summer camp programs. Our first clinic debuted in 2008 and the rest is history as we now serve over 650 Athletes in 25 cities across the United States.

Today, Will is 15 and has aspirations to become a fireman. I am already looking ahead, but I am concerned with the existing and limited programming. The programming that is meant to propel those with Down syndrome into the community is not tailored to our Athletes and their strengths, challenges, and interests.

Although society has come far in including our Athletes and helping them to become essential members of the community, we still have a way to go in ensuring that every individual with Down syndrome can proudly achieve more and live meaningful lives of self-worth and contribution.

For many individuals with Down syndrome, pathways to realizing dreams of becoming a fireman, teacher, police officer, lawyer, nurse, and more are simply not available. At Buddy Up Tennis, we create a customized learning environment for our Athletes to grow and reach their fullest potential. We believe in their abilities, have high expectations, and are ceaselessly working to create a bridge to reach for their dreams.

This year, my team and I provided the Buddy Up Tennis Athletes with the exciting chance to step into the shoes of their desired community contribution role. Each Athlete’s dream speaks volumes, and Buddy Up Tennis is committed to helping those with Down syndrome break down every barrier so they can achieve these dreams.

With the hope and goal of enhancing the ability of all of those with Down syndrome to live out their dreams, our future is truly brighter than ever. I invite you to join the Buddy Up Tennis journey in creating an environment where individuals with Down syndrome can shatter expectations and become the firefighters, police officers and teachers of tomorrow!

More info: buddyuptennis.com

#1

Will Gibson, Fireman

Will Gibson, Fireman

Kent Smith Report

#2

Joey Ruffle, Kidzbop Dancer

Joey Ruffle, Kidzbop Dancer

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#3

David Sutton, Weatherman

David Sutton, Weatherman

Kent Smith Report

Shawn 1 week agoHe actually fits the weatherman, like I could see him being the weatherman in some random city.

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#4

Cody Young, Police Officer

Cody Young, Police Officer

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satan hears a scream 1 week agowonderful smile!

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#5

Payton Murphy, Business Woman

Payton Murphy, Business Woman

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Chuckandlaura Powell 4 days agoLove this young lady and so very proud of her–her aunt laura

#6

Brian Sansone, Rec Center Coach

Brian Sansone, Rec Center Coach

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Rabbit Carrot 1 week agoMy friend’s son who has DS is a handball coach. He’s great at it.

#7

Jack Hickey, GF Chef

Jack Hickey, GF Chef

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#8

Maria Rudy, Dog Sitter

Maria Rudy, Dog Sitter

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Elina Kuusisto 1 week agoOoh good choice!!!

#9

Brady Finn, Football Coach

Brady Finn, Football Coach

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Rabbit Carrot 1 week agoNo reason why he couldn’t be one!

#10

Mario Lehman, Mechanic

Mario Lehman, Mechanic

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#11

Kambree Manns, NICU Nurse

Kambree Manns, NICU Nurse

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LoL.alpaca 1 week agoaww

#12

Anna Dunlope, Actress

Anna Dunlope, Actress

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LIZZZZZZZZZZZ 1 week agoBeautiful dress and beautiful person!

#13

Jon Lehman, Costume Shop Employee

Jon Lehman, Costume Shop Employee

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#14

Cameron Campfield, Football Manager

Cameron Campfield, Football Manager

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#15

Aidan Elliott, Construction Worker

Aidan Elliott, Construction Worker

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#16

Marcy Verdeyen, Hair Stylist

Marcy Verdeyen, Hair Stylist

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#17

Taylor Norman, Singer

Taylor Norman, Singer

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#18

Aidan Clegg, Pizzaiolo

Aidan Clegg, Pizzaiolo

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#19

Ben Barbour, Sports Enthusiast

Ben Barbour, Sports Enthusiast

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#20

Sarah Davis, Daycare Worker

Sarah Davis, Daycare Worker

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Tom Clements 6 days agoLove the mission – Great Job Beth and the Buddy Up Team

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Continue reading Athletes With Down Syndrome Share Their Dreams Through A Photoshoot

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