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Tag Archives: Perkins & Will

On the Move: Recent Top Promotions and Hires

FLOS

Roberta Silva (pictured at left) has been named CEO of Flos. She was selected by the group’s shareholders together with Piero Gandini, the entrepreneur who sold Flos to Design Holding. As CEO, she will carry forward the brand’s history of excellence and guide the company into a new phase of growth.

York Wallcoverings

Vincent Santini has been named vice president and general manager of York Brands. He will oversee all sales and support for York’s residential and commercial businesses. The company, approaching its 125th year in 2020, hopes to grow its reach in over 85 countries.

WeWork

James Slade has joined the design team at WeWork as VP of architecture. He will work with SVP of architecture Michael Rojkind and chief architect Bjark Ingles on all ground-up projects. Slade co-founded Slade Architecture with his partner, Hayes Slade, in 2002, and has built projects in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Ware Malcomb

Joshua Thompson (pictured at right) has been promoted to studio manager, interior architecture and design in Ware Malcomb’s downtown San Diego office. He previously served as senior project manager for the past five years in the Phoenix office. He will lead Ware Malcomb’s interior architecture & design studio in San Diego and manage select projects.

R&A Architecture & Design

Culver City-based R&A Architecture & Design is rebranding their firm to OfficeUntitled and expanding the leadership team, made up of principals Christian Robert, Benjamin Anderson, Shawn Gehle and Lindsay Green. Recent projects include Woodlark Hotel in Portland, The Cayton Children’s Museum in Santa Monica, and the Harland in Beverly Hills.

The Switzer Group

Sabrina Pagani has joined The Switzer Group’s Manhattan team as principal. She will oversee a number of high-profile workplace interiors out of the nationally ranked interior architecture firm’s New York studio.

BDG Architecture + Design

BDG Architecture + Design is opening a new studio in New York, expanding into the North American market. BDG’s global chief creative officer, Colin Macgadie will provide creative direction for the studio. Kelly D. Powell and Rebecca Wu-Norman will be studio leads.

TRIO

Ericka Moody has joined TRIO as regional vice president. Moody is a 30-year veteran of the interior design industry and has overseen hundreds of successful national and international projects. TRIO has expanded its work in California significantly over the last several years and has recently completed dozens of projects, including work with Touchstone Communities, Shea Homes, and Simpson Property Group.

Perkins + Will

Maha Sabra has been promoted to associate principal in the New York studio of Perkins + Will in support of the healthcare practice. In the past five years at the studio, she has transitioned from a design practitioner to project manager. As a senior project manager, Sabra plays a central role leading the studio’s healthcare teams.

HOK

Kimberly Dowdell (pictured at right) has returned to HOK as director of business development in Chicago. Dowdell is a licensed architect with a wealth of expertise in strategic planning, design, project management, housing policy, and real estate development. She previously worked in HOK’s New York studio from 2008-2011.

Wilson Associates

Kathleen Lynch has joined the Dallas studio of Wilson Associates as operations director. Lynch has 15 years of professional experience as a LEED-accredited interior designer and field manager. She will oversee teams on a roster of hospitality projects in Nevada, California, and other areas across the Southwest.

WRNS Studio

Kevin Wilcock has joined WRNS Studio as associate principal. He brings 25 years experience leading affordable and market-rate housing projects. He will be based out of WRNS Studio’s Honolulu office, guiding the studio’s multi-family housing practice with a focus on the Pacific region.

Read more: On the Move: April’s Top Promotions and Hires

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Perkins + Will Blurs Work-Leisure Lines for Madison Marquette’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters

PROJECT NAME Madison Marquette
LOCATION Washington
FIRM Perkins + Will
SQ. FT. 17,800 SQF

Escorting several visitors through real-estate developer Madison Marquette’s new headquarters at the Wharf in Washington, D.C., chief development and asset management officer Peter Cole opens a closet door.

“Everybody squeeze in,” he commands. Inside is a counter with a white lacquered backsplash, which slides open seconds later to reveal a conference room. “In lengthy meetings, people wonder, Are we ever going to eat?” Cole explains. “Then they turn around and they’re like, Where did that buffet come from?”

In a corridor of the Madison Marquette headquarters, a storytelling wall slices up a photomural of the Wharf, one of the real-estate developer’s projects. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Two of the visitors, Perkins + Will design principal Ken Wilson and senior associate Haley Nelson, have seen the trick many times. They designed it, after all, to convey hospitality as a theme for a developer whose many mixed-use projects, including the 3.2-million-square-foot Wharf itself, purposefully blur the traditional lines between living, work, and leisure.

Bertjan Pot and Marcel Wander’s pendant fixture hangs above a Bassam Fellows sofa in the lounge. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Most of the 17,800-square-foot workplace operates on the show-don’t-tell principle, borrowing odd angles for phone rooms, embedding device chargers in terrazzo counters, and combining textures and finishes befitting a luxury hotel.

The company’s name appears hardly anywhere. The primary branding element is down a hallway leading to a conference area. On one side, a wall of glazing admits daylight and views of the Potomac River.

The storytelling wall’s fins are aluminum. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The eye is drawn, however, to the interior wall, where a series of 6-inch-wide, floor-to-ceiling aluminum fins—each imprinted with a slice of a photomural of the Wharf, rendered in bokeh effect—forms a lenticular installation: Approached from the right, the abstract image appears to be a daytime scene; from the left, it’s evening. Between the fins, a millwork display presents a photo series telling the company’s story through iconic projects from New Jersey to California.

Reception’s desk is backed by a lacquered logo wall, both custom. Photography by Eric Laignel.

“The images are held in place magnetically and can be switched out to reflect specific services,” Wilson says. Those include development, leasing, and management for 330 assets in 24 states and a $6.2 billion investment portfolio. Which means, Wilson says, that the most important design consideration was to create a space “that still looks good with boxes of pizza everywhere.”

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

Images of signature Madison Marquette projects are displayed between the fins. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Jeremy Pyles globe pendants illuminate the lounge’s custom terrazzo-topped island. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Claudia and Harry Washington lounge chairs stand near the communal walnut table in the café. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Ash-veneered storage and a custom quartz desktop define a collaborative work space. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Shared areas are separated from workstations and offices by a partition. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Millwork in the same veneer pairs with ceramic tile in a restroom. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Sources: From Top: Geiger: Chairs (Lounge). HBF Textiles: Chair Fabric. Vitra: Side Tables. Flos: Floor Lamp. Arzu Studio Hope: Rug. Moooi: Pendant Fixture. GSky: Plant Wall. Davis: Coffee Table (Lounge), Sofa (Café). Niche: Globe Pendant Fixtures (Lounge, Café). Herman Miller: Sofa, Barstools (Lounge), Dining Chairs (Café), Work-Stations, Task Chair, Stools (Office Area). Luum: Wall Covering (Reception, Office Area). 3M: Dichroic Film (Reception). Heath Ceramics: Backsplash (Lounge). Terrazzo & Marble Supply Companies: Island Solid-Surfacing. Kohler Co.: Sink, Sink Fittings. Restoration Hardware: Communal Table (Café). Bernhardt: Lounge Chairs, Wood Side Table. Maharam: Chair Fabric, Rug. Blu Dot: Coffee Table. Spinneybeck: Sofa Upholstery. Arktura: Ceiling Baffles. Formica: Custom Millwork (Office Area, Restroom). Transwall: Storefront System (Office Area). USG: Acoustical Ceiling Tile. McGrory Glass: Partition Markerboard. Clarus: Markerboard (Offices). Design Within Reach: Bench (Restroom). Electric Mirror: Mirror. Toto: Sink Fittings. Mockett: Cabinetry Hardware. American Standard: Toilet. Kohler Co.: Towel Bars. Crossville: Floor Tile. Architectural Ceramics: Wall Tile. Carnegie Fabrics: Wall Covering. Throughout: Focal Point: Recessed Fixtures. reSAWN Timber Co.: Wood Flooring. Shaw Contract Group: Carpet. Architectural Veneers International: Custom Veneer. DuPont: Solid-Surfacing. Benjamin Moore & Co.: Paint. Patricia Kazinski: Lighting Consultant. GHT Limited Consulting Engineers: MEP. Columbia Woodworking: Woodwork. James G. Davis Construction Corporation: General Contractor.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

ASID Events

NATIONAL
JUN
10
ASID at NeoCon

DESCRIPTION

NeoCon® is the world’s leading platform and most important event of the year for the commercial design industry. With nearly 1 million square feet of exhibition space, NeoCon will feature game-changing products and services from both leading companies and emerging talent–providing unparalleled access to the latest and most innovative solutions in commercial design.

 

DATE AND TIME

8:00 AM
6/10/2019 – 6/12/2019

LOCATION

theMART
222 Merchandise Mart Plaza
Suite 470
Chicago, IL 60654
United States

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KEYNOTE WITH ILSE CRAWFORD OF STUDIOILSE

Date: June 11, 2019
Time: 8 a.m.
Location: NeoCon Theater, 19th Floor, theMart

Stuff Matters: The Material World We Make

Ilse Crawford is a designer, academic, and creative director with a simple mission:  to put human needs and desires at the center of all she does. As founder of Studioilse, together with her multi-disciplinary, London-based team, she brings her philosophy to life. This means creating environments where humans feel comfortable; public spaces that make people feel at home; and homes that are habitable and make sense for the people who live in them. It means designing furniture and products that support and enhance human behavior and actions in everyday life. It means restoring the human balance in brands and businesses that have lost their way.

ASID INSTALLATION

Date: Throughout NeoCon

ASID is thrilled to showcase the impact of design through an exciting new installation custom designed by Elizabeth von Lehe, Allied ASID, design and brand strategy principal, HDR. The space serves as an oasis that invites visitors to engage, ask broad questions, and explore the beautiful, impactful, and sometimes surprising ways that design impacts lives.

ASID PRESENTS INSIGHTS FROM THE 2019 OUTCOME OF DESIGN AWARDS

Date: Wednesday, June 12
Time: 8 a.m.

Following the first-ever Outcome of Design Awards, created in collaboration with NeoCon, Herman Miller, and METROPOLIS magazine, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) will explore how design truly impacts lives as seen through occupancy data and analysis.

The Outcome of Design Awards (OODA) honor firms that showcase the power of design through research-driven results and innovative, humancentric concepts. This panel, moderated by ASID, will explore how this design approach can be implemented across projects and will highlight the 2019 OODA winning projects and the data that clearly says it all.

STUDENT PROGRAMING: DESIGN PATHWAYS

Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Time: 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. (panel); 10:30 a.m. – Noon (tour)

Panelists: Meena Krenek, ASID, Gensler; David Euscher, ASID, LEED AP, Corgan; Carolyn Ames Noble, ASID, Ames Design Studio; David Cordell, ASID, Perkins+Will; Jennifer Quail (Moderator, editor-in-chief, i+D)

Showroom/Exhibit Spaces: Allsteel, Benjamin Moore, Humanscale, Keilhauer, Sherwin Williams, True Residential, Wilsonart, Brown Jordan, Construction Specialties, Teknion and Mohawk

Why are trade shows important to the life of an interior designer? A panel of experienced design professionals will explain why trade shows are essential to your career and why it’s imperative to attend them. Our experts will give you insight on what questions to ask, how to evaluate products, and why it is so critical to your success to make connections and establish strong vendor relationships throughout your career.

After the panel discussion, you will break into small groups and tour the show floor with one of our panelists to receive guidance on how to make the most of your time at these important professional events.

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25 Sustainable Projects to Celebrate Earth Day

 

Happy Earth Day! Sustainability is becoming a standard in architecture, and LEED certification is only the beginning. These projects prove that green design is the new frontier.

1. Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Strikes All the Right Notes With Arvo Pärt Centre in Estonia

Spanish firm Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos won a two-phase competition to design this center with their thesis that links music and architecture. Considering the ratio of glass to metal also became essential because of the layers of thermal insulation needed to create a sustainable and easily heated structure. But first Nieto Sobejano decided what the project shouldn’t have: right angles, a main facade, and a discernable front or back. Instead, what emerged was a pattern of “continuous links echoing the trees,” Sobejano says. Read more

2. Sustainably Designed and Architecturally Significant Buildings in Singapore

Not only is the entire 27-floor external facade wrapped in a natural vine covered sunscreen, but the Oasia Hotel Downtown also has four lush sky terraces, 1,793 large planter boxes, and four large structural cores that allow for good cross ventilation reducing the overall energy cost. Designed by WOHA and completed in 2016, the hotel is home to over 33 species of plants and 21 species of creepers. In addition, the 314-room property is notable for its striking interior design by Patricia UrquiolaRead about 7 more sustainable buildings in Singapore

3. Warmth and Modernism Are at the Heart of 3XN’s Design for Olympic House

Two of the most poignant concepts International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach wanted the design to articulate were sustainability and transparency. 3XN certainly delivered; the build is LEED platinum-certified, and has reused 90 percent of the concrete from the previous headquarters that was demolished to make way for the new build. Read more

4. ACDF Architecture Partners With Architecture49 for Mega Project Parq Vancouver

Six stories high, capped with a 30,000-square-foot roof garden, this contemporary structure “is an urban oasis,”ACDF Architecture CEO Maxime-Alexis Frappier says. ACDF partnered with Architecture49 and their response was not a looming hulk but rather a curving, low-rise presence wrapped in a mirrored facade that reflects its surroundings. Aluminum louvers, capturing sunlight, reflect pixelated images of the Rocky Mountains in the distance. The daylight resulting from abundant glazing contributes to the project’s LEED Gold status, proving Parq fits into the global environment, too. Read more

5. Annapolis Residence by Bates Masi + Architects Wins 2018 Best of Year Award for Waterfront House

When a prospective client in Annapolis, Maryland, told Bates Masi + Architects‘ principal Paul Masi that he and his wife had recently purchased a house on the water, he really meant it: The residence’s second-floor deck literally hung right over a cove in the Chesapeake Bay. However, the 1970s structure was sorely outdated, located in the flood plain, and didn’t meet current energy codes. Masi’s solution yielded a new, flat-roofed house, raised three feet higher than its predecessor—and LEED-certified to boot. Read more

6. TPG Architecture Makes Headlines With Its Office for the Associated Press in New York

The AP staffers have had a chance to settle into their new digs by TPG Architecture, which have since been awarded LEED Gold certification. As you might expect, good news travels fast. As Carmel says, the office “compliments who we are as an organization.” That includes a bit of spirit, as seen at the perimeter of the café. There the white floor tile bursts into a confetti of colors, as if celebrating the much-decorated news agency. Read more

7. Tsingpu Yangzhou Retreat by Neri & Hu Design and Research Office Wins 2018 Best of Year Award for Green

For Neri & Hu, this project entailed repurposing and renovating existing structures—including a former warehouse that now hosts a restaurant, a theater, and an exhibition space—as well as erecting new ones, among them a lakeside pavilion containing four of the 20 suites. “The rustic materiality and layered spaces redefine tradition via a modern architectural language,” says Neri. Read more

8. Studio Rianknop Creates Flexible, Sustainable Space for Amsterdam Tech Company

When an Amsterdam company that manages a file-sharing platform decided to move from the city center to a warehouse near the city limits, it shared a few tasks with local design firm Studio Rianknop: Create a flexible space for the company’s staff; make it sustainable; and take advantage of the industrial space in a relaxing, inviting way. In a clever nod to the wires funneling data across the globe, a “cable tree” grows from the lower level with branches powering first-floor public spaces and a tubular chandelier. Read more

9. The Center for Fiction by BKSK Architects Brings Books and Sustainability to Brooklyn

The Center for Fiction started out as the Mercantile Library in 1821 and moved locations throughout Manhattan over the years. In 2008, it was rebranded, and more than 10 years later, the Center has a permanent home in a LEED Silver-certified building in downtown Brooklyn by BKSK Architects. In the writers’ studio, locally-made custom wool felt panels are perforated with the Center’s logo, an open book. Read more

10. ASID Headquarters Becomes World’s First Space to Earn LEED and WELL Platinum Certification

The Washington, DC office, designed by Perkins + Will, is brimming with features that support health and wellness. One is a circadian lighting system that mimics natural daylight, paired with automated shades that follow the sun’s movement to help eliminate eye strain. The design team also implemented biophilic design strategies, for instance by using a range of natural materials and patterns. Read more

11. Mohawk Group’s New NYC Showroom Embraces Wellness

Located in a former textile factory in historic Chelsea, Mohawk Group‘s 13,000-square-foot showroom was designed by Gensler and incorporates LEED and WELL Building Standard qualifications, fully expressing Mohawk’s company ethos: Believe in better. Read more

12. Huntsman Architectural Group Downsizes McKesson for Maximum Efficiency

For McKesson’s San Francisco office, Huntsman Architectural Group went with undeniably contemporary furnishings. Sui generis, however, is a break room’s custom bench, a repurposed conveyor belt hinting at McKesson’s core business. Which brings us to the fact that the premises are going for Well Building certification as well as LEED Gold. Read more

13. Perkins + Will Creates a Contemporary Office for Nixon Peabody in New York

Perkins + Will designed this space to be easily reconfigured as needs change. A feature stair connects the office’s three levels with show-stopping views of the city, and floor-to-ceiling glass walls help foster synergy between practice areas. It was also awarded LEED Gold certification. In all, the office is a balance of functionality and design statement. Read more

14. Five Global Green Projects Pay it Forward

For Park + Associates‘s own office, minimal intervention transformed a 1960’s former school into a showcase of clean-lined design, thanks to vintage furnishings, a black-and-white palette, and painted-steel arches highlighting the reinforced-concrete barrel vaults. Read about all 5 global green projects

15. SKB Architects Creates Lively Lobby for Key Center Office Tower

No longer merely pass-through places, lobbies have become hotel-esque settings. They entice potential tenants to lease, and existing tenants get a perk that might entice them to stay. Such is the case at the Key Center office tower across the water from Seattle. After purchasing the 23-story building, Kilroy Realty Corporation opted to implement changes resulting in LEED Platinum certification and to transform the immense lobby into a “people place,” SKB Architects senior principal Shannon Gaffney recounts. “That’s our thing.” Read more

16. Mosa Tiles Enliven Venetian Villa by JM Architecture

Italian studio JM Architecture outlined a sustainable agenda to maximize the home’s energy-efficiency. Mosa’s LEED-contributing ceramic tiles, which received Cradle-to-Cradle® Silver certification, join the multitude of eco-friendly features that distinguish the villa, including inlaid photovoltaic panels and radiant floor heating. Read more

17. Venable by Alliance Architecture Wins 2017 Best of Year Award for Large Law Office

Moving to a gleaming LEED Platinum palace in the booming East End, this 117-year-old law firm left behind the endless dreary silos of its former headquarters and embraced a cultural shift toward wellness and ergonomics. Thanks to Alliance Architecture, sunlight penetrates offices with clear glass enclosures, every employee has a motorized standing desk, and the café opens onto a terrace complete with barbecue grills, a fire pit, a bar, and a bocce court. Read more

18. 1 Hotel’s Miami Beach Debut by Meyer Davis Studio

Meyer Davis Studio was charged with transforming the lower eight stories of a 1968 building into 1 Hotel Miami. “We paid homage to the natural landscape of south Florida,” Meyer notes—versus the art deco razzle-dazzle typically associated with the area. Moves large and small rack up points in the quest for LEED Silver certification. Uses of reclaimed wood represent a virtual forest preserved. Dialing down to details, Meyer andDavis specified organic bed linens, hemp mattresses, and clothes hangers molded from recycled paper, while bedside note pads have disappeared in favor of chalkboards. Read more

19. Lotus Square Art Center by Shenzhen Dae Wins 2018 Best of Year Award for Outdoor

It’s basically common knowledge these days that installing a green roof on a building helps reduce its energy use, absorb stormwater, and combat air pollution. This practice has become increasingly mainstream in hotter developed land masses known as urban heat islands. One such is Hengqin island, overlooking Macau. That’s where this sculptural verdant roof tops an art exhibition hall. Read more

20. Six Futuristic Projects Sprouting Green Roofs

From reducing storm water runoff and city dust to energy-efficient cooling, the benefits of green roofing go beyond beautification. As costs lower and technology makes installation easier, this environmentally conscious trend is increasingly defining the facades of both existing and new buildings. A 660-foot-long undulating wave of verdant green grass forms a rooftop park at Université Paris-Est’s technology and science center, the Espace Bienvenüe designed by Jean-Philippe Pargade. Read about all six green roofs

21. Kimpton Travels to the Caribbean

Amid the sea blues and sandy whites of this resort, there’s a good amount of green, too: A solar array generates electricity, rainwater is harvested for maintaining the landscape, and air-conditioning is geothermal. Read more

22. Mortenhals House by Stinessen Arkitektur Wins 2017 Best of Year Award for Green

The unusual configuration of this family compound by Snorre Stinessen, comprising multiple cabins, plays with the way that the visitor slowly discovers what’s hidden behind the wooden doors. Even the outdoor areas remain private, with only waterscapes or trees as neighbors. In addition to the aesthetic appeal of the design, it checks off all the eco-conscious boxes: The forest was protected during the building process, all wood was sourced locally, water is used with restraint, and electricity is primarily hydropower. Read more

23. HKS’s Loretta Fulvio Decodes U.S. Bank Stadium, Site of Super Bowl LII

When designing for a Super Bowl–sized audience, there’s no greater expert than Loretta Fulvio, lead interior designer for architecture firm HKS’s Sports sector. When tasked with designing the U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Fulvio and her team sought to create experiences that extend far beyond Super Bowl Sunday. In the stands, visitors can feel good about making a positive impact: 91 percent of waste is recycled, composted, or donated, due to the concession stands using compostable packaging. And the entire venue is run on wind power. Read more

24. San Vicente 935 by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects Wins 2018 Best of Year Award for Rental Apartment Building

All apartments in this building have balconies overlooking the central courtyard. Its accessibility eliminates the need for interior, climate-controlled hallways, saving on energy consumption. For the solid faces, Lorcan O’Herlihy employed two materials that contrast each other for visual interest and also help to reduce scale. Siding is fiber cement made of recycled content. Screens, which act as a rain-shield system, are slats of ipe harvested from a local, sustainably managed forest. Read more

25. A Bamboo Kitchen Dominates This Super-Green House by Minarc

Built with prefab panels, this 2,500-square-foot structure by Minarc is sustainable to the max. Bathrooms overflow with eco consciousness. In the powder room, wood scraps stack up to form a vanity supporting a sink in recycled rubber. For a truly back-to-nature experience, right next to the soaking tub in the master bathroom, there’s a lush plant wall. Read more

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The Most Expensive Buildings in the U.S.

Ask the average American which city contains nearly half of America’s most expensive buildings and what would they say? New York, perhaps? Or maybe Los Angeles? Chicago, for those who know of the Windy City’s rich architectural history? But alas, none of those answers would be correct. According to a new survey by Emporis (a data website that collects information about buildings around the world), Las Vegas houses nine out of the 20 most expensive buildings in the country. While big-name architects and location both play a part in the final cost, oftentimes it’s the infrastructure that makes a million-dollar design turn into a multimillion-dollar project. Below, ADsurveys the 20 most expensive buildings in the United States.

 

Millennium Tower

Building: Millennium Tower
Location: Boston, MA
Cost: $620 million
Year: 2016
Architect: Handel Architects

The Mirage

Building: The Mirage
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $650 million
Year: 1989
Architect: Joel Bergman

Palms Place

Building: Palms Place
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $650 million
Year: 2008
Architect: KGA Architecture

 

Belfer Research Building

Building: Belfer Research Building
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $650 million
Year: 2014
Architects: Todd Schliemann, Ennead Architects

Rush Hospital, East Tower

Building: The Rush Hospital, East Tower
Location: Chicago, IL
Cost: $654 million
Year: 2012
Architect: Perkins & Will

7 World Trade Center

Building: 7 World Trade Center
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $700 million
Year: 2006
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

 

Elara

Building: Elara
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $750 million
Year: 2009
Architect: Gerald Koi

Devon Energy Center

Building: Devon Energy Center
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Cost: $750 million
Year: 2012
Architect: Jon Pickard

Paris Las Vegas

Building: Paris Las Vegas
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $785 million
Year: 1999
Architect: Joel Bergman

 

The New York Times Building

Building: The New York Times Building
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $850,000,000
Year: 2007
Architect: Renzo Piano

Trump International Hotel & Tower

Building: Trump International Hotel & Tower (center)
Location: Chicago, IL
Cost: $850 million
Year: 2009
Architect: Adrian Smith, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill

Red Rock Casino Resort & Spa

Building: Red Rock Casino Resort & Spa
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $925 million
Year: 2006
Architect: Friedmutter Group

 

MGM Grand Resort & Casino

Building: MGM Grand Resort & Casino
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $1 billion
Year: 1993
Architect: Veldon Simpson

SunTrust Financial Centre

Building: SunTrust Financial Centre
Location: Tampa, FL
Cost: $1 billion
Year: 1992
Architect: Cooper Carry

Bank of America Tower

Building: Bank of America Tower
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $1 billion
Year: 2009
Architects: COOKFOX Architects and Adamson Associates Architects

 

Wilshire Grand Center

Building: Wilshire Grand Center
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Cost: $1.2 billion
Year: 2017
Architect: AC Martin Partners

The Palazzo

Building: The Palazzo
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $1.9 billion
Year: 2007
Architect: HKS

Goldman Sachs Headquarters

Building: Goldman Sachs Headquarters
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $2.1 billion
Year: 2010
Architects: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners and Adamson Associates Architects

 

Wynn Las Vegas

Building: Wynn Las Vegas
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: $2.7 billion
Year: 2005
Architect: Marnell Corrao Associates

One World Trade Center

Building: One World Trade Center
Location: New York, NY
Cost: $3.8 billion
Year: 2014
Architects: David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

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