Tag Archives: Paris

Immersive Van Gogh Exhibition Is Coming to New York City This Summer

By Margherita Cole on April 16, 2021 

Immersive Van Gogh Exhibition Toronto

Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit Toronto (Photo: Courtesy of Immersive Van Gogh)

The enchanting Van Gogh experience that wowed Paris and Toronto is debuting concurrently at different cities in the United States this summer, including Los Angeles and New York City. Like the previous shows, the Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit in NYC will feature state-of-the-art digital projections of the Dutch Post-Impressionist’s sunflowers, self-portraits, and landscapes on the walls, floors, and ceilings.

Continue reading Immersive Van Gogh Exhibition Is Coming to New York City This Summer

Dolomites in 50 Shades of Grey

Art director and photographer based in Paris, Clément Merouani likes to immortalize and sublimate the places he visits around the world : London, New York, Venice, Barcelona… In his “Black & White Dolomites” project, published on Behance, the artist unveils a series of monochrome landscapes. We discover the quiet and majestic reliefs of this mountain range located between the Alps and the north of Italy, in different shades of gray.closevolume_off

Continue reading Dolomites in 50 Shades of Grey

If Famous Monuments In Paris Were Turned Into Pop Culture Characters By Benoit Lapray (13 Pics) Interview With Artist

All around the world, monuments and statues are honoring historical events of the region or political figures that helped shape the world into what it is today. There are some statues for religion, nature, folklore, and even tragedies as well. But how often do we see statues portraying pop-culture figures from our favorite movies, cartoons, books, or TV shows?

Continue reading If Famous Monuments In Paris Were Turned Into Pop Culture Characters By Benoit Lapray (13 Pics) Interview With Artist

17 Artists Suggested Their Own Ideas For The Notre Dame Cathedral Reconstruction

Back on April 15, Paris suffered a disaster that touched the hearts of many Parisians and other people worldwide – the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire, a 15-hour-long inferno that destroyed a big part of the cathedral’s roof along with its iconic spire. However, most of the building survived the fire and people from all over the world have donated money to help rebuild it. And while many believe that the cathedral should be rebuilt to its original state, some artists are offering their own unique ideas for the reconstruction.

A few days after the fire, France decided to host a design competition for the cathedral’s spire replacement. Edouard Philippe, the prime minister of France, said that they were looking for a fresh look “adapted to the techniques and the challenges of our era”. Many artists responded to this competition and you can see some of the most interesting projects in the gallery below!

h/t

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Image source: ejezeta.cl

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Image source: Vincent Callebaut Architectures

In his project called ‘Palingenesis’, architect Vincent Callebaut tried to combine science, art, and spirituality into one beautiful glass creation. The architect imagined a garden under the glass exterior that would serve as both aesthetic and nourishing purposes. “Transparency, sharing and openness to our society’s development: such are the ideas conveyed by this new, diaphanous forest of Notre-Dame, outlining the new face of the Church in the 21st century. A dynamic, agile and contemporary Church,” says the architect.

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Image source: studio NAB

Studio NAB propose a greenhouse on top of the cathedral and even beehives inside the spire.

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Image source: studiotjoa

“Our Proposal for the new roof and spire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris: A Phoenix rises from the ashes. The spire, clad in sand cast copper panels, emerges from the blackened stainless steel roof supported by flame charred glulam trusses in remembrance of what was and what can become.”

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Image source: summumarchi

“A proposal by summumarchi gives access to Notre Dame’s attic to make it a commemorative park, with purple colors in memory of the fire, while taking advantage of this enormous generosity of donations to make it a sanctuary for animals and insects even more threatened in cities. May this reconstruction serve the environment, and demonstrate to the rest of the world the knowledge of our French companions of how to deal with magnificent, technical, timeless architecture at the highest level possible. A symbol for future generations.”

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Image source: honored_art

“Upward motion, an idea of mine for Notre Dame’s spire”

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Image source: Norman Foster

Architect Norman Foster says his spire design resembles a “super-slender needle touching heaven’s clouds” and supposedly would give the structure more light.

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Image source: alex_nerovnya

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Image source: godart_roussel_architectes

“This subject is very sensitive for reasons that are easily understood. The wood that the construction was made out of as well as its assemblages and age make it a remarkable and honorable creation. It is hard to imagine that there would be another option than rebuilding the identical roof structure and the roof by using all the documents we have. Just like the castle of Guédelon, that is being rebuilt using the knowledge of our ancestors, Notre-Dame de Paris could also become a huge open-air educational project. In a few decades, this tragic episode would fade and as a result we would have a brand new roof of the Cathedral. But if we think about it, would we really be satisfied with this result? What other pleasure would we find besides that of comforting us in the certainty that everything is eternal?”

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Image source: fuksas_architects

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Image source: alexandre_fantozzi

“Our proposal for the restoration of the Notre Dame Cathedral is to use one element that it has the best, the stained glass.

Make all the cover in stained glass, including the tower, with transparency to the inner side, through the opening of the vaults, leaving only the structures flying buttresses.

In Gothic there is the connection of the earth to the sky, and inside the Cathedral, the natural illumination multiplies in colors through the filter of the cover in stained glass.

At night the inner illumination turns into a grandiose retro backlit coverage.”

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Image source: mathieulehanneur

“Some say that we should rebuild the spire as it was originally. Others say that we should design a new one. So, let’s build a new one as it was… 8 days ago”

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Image source: poa.estudio

“NOUVELLE DAME – Proposal for a new cover of Notre Dame, París”

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Image source: deroodavid

“Today the French architecture board website reads, ’Heritage, ancient or contemporary, is a revealing and structuring element of our culture, and we must inculcate ourselves to keep alive these markers but also built today the markers of our time’.Ultimately, I trust in France’s cultural core and its decision makers to have the audacity to move forward while retaining The Lady’s timeless image. I can only hope the project will be humble but innovative, delicate, beautiful and engaged,created by highly skilled people around a common table.”

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Image source: alexandre_fantozzi

“A single element used, stained glass. No new architectural features, no intervention elements (redesign), no ego, no artistic aspirations.

The material specified for this, stained glass, is made of a high-tech glass produced by a renowned and traditional French factory. The glasses have sun protection, without changing the desired aesthetic.

The windows offer greater thermal comfort inside the Cathedral, greater natural light, reduces external noise.”

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Image source: vizumatelier

“It’s a tragedy. Nothing would ever return over 850 years of beauty, but it’s time to [rebirth] Notre-Dame. In Gothic times builders [tried] to reach the sky, Le Duc [tried] it also in 19th century and have come closer. Now it’s possible to make it happen. Lightweight crown that connects heaven with earth.”

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Image source: kissthearchitect900 shares

Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

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Banksy Attacks Paris’ Walls With Six New Works Criticizing The French Government

By now, Banksy has got to be one of the most well-known street artists in the world. This elusive artist is best known for his snark political commentary on how the government treats the working class, expressed through stencil art. This time, over the course of the Paris Fashion Week, Banksy hit the French capital with six new works.

The first one is a girl painting over a swastika with a pink Victorian pattern, which is a reference to the artist’s 2008 piece called “Go Flock Yourself”. The artwork criticizes the seemingly fascist French government migrant policies. The second one portrays a man offering a bone to a legless dog, a metaphor for the politicians tricking people with promises that can have masked agendas. Another one is Banksy’s take on the iconic “Napoleon Crossing the Alps” painting, that mocks the way the French government leads the country, blinding people with fake promises. The last three works feature stencil rats – Banksy’s signature stencil, inspired by Parisian artist Blek Le Rat, representing the working class and the way people can make significant changes when working together.

Although Banksy himself has not signed or confirmed the works as his own, experts say that the works certainly look genuine. Check out the new pieces in the gallery below!

More info: wherethereswalls h/t

Over the course of the Paris Fashion Week, Banksy hit the French capital with six new works

The artwork criticizes the seemingly fascist French government migrant policies

 One of the works portrays a man offering a bone to a legless dog, a metaphor for the politicians tricking people with promises that can have masked agendas

Another work is Banksy’s take on the iconic “Napoleon Crossing the Alps” painting

It mocks the way the French government leads the country, blinding people with fake promises

The last three works feature stencil rats – Banksy’s signature stencil, inspired by Parisian artist Blek Le Rat

The rats are a representation of the working class and the way people make significant changes when working together

Although Banksy himself has not signed or confirmed the works as his own, experts say that the works certainly look genuine

467 shares

Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!

These 58 Pie Crust Designs By German Baker Are Pie-Fection (New Pics)

German baker and photographer Karin Pfeiff-Boschek takes pastry baking to a whole new level that is definitely close to pie-fection. She masterfully arranges dough and fruits into the most beautiful pie crust designs. Vibrant botanical and geometrical ornaments on top of delicious pies make them almost too pretty to eat.

If you think that these pies look straight out of recipe book pages—rightfully so. The artist has published a detailed guide on how to turn your favorite pies into edible works of art in her accurately-titled book “Elegant Pie.”

Many people have started experimenting in the kitchen during quarantine, so here’s a list that will truly challenge your skills and make your mouth water! And excuse us in advance for all the growls in your stomach this may cause. If you are still hungry, check out our previous post with more amazing pies.

More info: Instagram | ourdeliciousfood.com

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoI’m guessing it is magically delicious.

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Karin Pfeiff-Boschek told Bored Panda that her journey with pastry started in childhood, but didn’t evolve into a profession: “As a child, I enjoyed seeing, smelling, and eating the bread and pastries that both of my grandmothers made. Baking was traditional in our family in rural Germany and when I was a young teenager, I began baking cakes and pastries for my brother and sister.”

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoSure, I’ll have seconds.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoAny Catan players getting hungry?

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“In my twenties, I spent many summers in Paris and was fascinated by the beautiful baked goods in every pâtisserie on nearly every street corner. I did not become a baker, however, but became interested in fabrics, eventually designing, dyeing, and creating my own works of textile art. Nonetheless, I enjoyed baking, often experimenting with various doughs and batters.”

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Pie-Crust-Design-Before-After-Part-2-Karin-Pfeiff-Boschek

karinpfeiffboschek Report

Suzanne Clark 1 day agoThat is amazing; it took a while to catch on that it’s apple slices.

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“My American-born husband learned to bake pies from his mother, a prize-winning pie baker and a very good cook. I thought the pies were delicious, but began to wonder whether one could decorate them in a manner similar to the way cakes are turned into works of art. This was just at the time that I opened an account on Instagram and I began uploading pictures of my attempts at pie decoration. To my surprise and delight, the comments were positive, resulting in a rapid rise in the number of followers of my account,” says the artist, who now has an impressive number of over 90k followers on Instagram.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoGetting ready for several slices of heaven.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoThis is a peach of a pie.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 22 hours agoTHE EYE

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Misterscooter 1 day agoAlways take picture before cutting.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Up All Night 1 day agoIt hurts my OCD that the biggest blueberry isn’t placed on the center.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Curry on… 1 day agoI’d like to know what kind of tools she uses. These are beautiful.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 22 hours agoYour pies are absolutely WONDERFUL!

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Helen Haley 1 day agoWhat kind of berries are these?

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoI’d be astounded to be served this.

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Pie-Crust-Design-Before-After-Part-2-Karin-Pfeiff-Boschek

karinpfeiffboschek Report

3 8 5 19 19 1 1 day agoThese baked goods are so beautiful it’s almost a shame that they have to be eaten!

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Pie-Crust-Design-Before-After-Part-2-Karin-Pfeiff-Boschek

karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day ago (edited)Gay abandon. Just perfect happiness.It makes me smile.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoSigh. Pure beauty. And looks delicious.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 22 hours agoThis is absolutely amazing, I would NOT want to eat it.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoMind boggling.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoI’ve never had a baked strawberry pie.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 22 hours agosymetrical pie

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoEdible crewel work.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 2 hours agoAbsolutely Amazing

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

April Simnel 2 days agoThis looks like one that I could do.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Yayaboobo 17 hours agoThese remind me of crop circles

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Love Math 1 hour agoYum!

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Martine 1 hour agoArt déco design!

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Mia Lukie 13 hours agoMy fave one! Beautiful!

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Podunkus 1 day agoI didn’t think the stars would hold their shape. Boy was I wrong.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Suzanne Clark 1 day agoOh rats! After all these pictures, now I want pie.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoBeautiful but how tasty is the peel?

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoAn edible garden.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoOh, for Thanksgiving. Great pattern.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day ago (edited)Totally charming. My fork would like to jump into this pile of leaves.

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Helen Haley 1 day agoJust another brick in the wall

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karinpfeiffboschek Report

Dorothy Parker 1 day agoIt feels Turkish.

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Pie-Crust-Design-Before-After-Part-2-Karin-Pfeiff-Boschek

karinpfeiffboschek Report

Mary Brosnihan 18 hours agoHow was the kiwi after baking? I am mesmerized by all of these. Thanks so much for sharing.

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Continue reading These 58 Pie Crust Designs By German Baker Are Pie-Fection (New Pics)

100 Graffiti Artists Were Asked To Paint An Entire School, And This Is The Result

Think all schools have to look plain and boring? Well, then allow the interior of a student residence at the Cité Internationale Universitaire in Paris change that belief. As part of the urban festival Rehab 2, artists gave in to their imaginations and decorated the walls just as they pleased – and the result is nothing short of amazing.

The festival ran from June 16 to July 16. Unfortunately, the exhibition will be on display only for a limited period of time. Soon the school will close for major renovation and all this awesome art will be erased.

Still, the photographers managed to capture it in pictures, proving that just for once, the school environment can be stimulating, inspiring, and absolutely wild.

Check out some of our favorite pictures below, and let us know in the comments, which one you like the best.

More info: Jonk Photography (h/t: boredpanda)

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Mickaël Gouret Goes Classic for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding Shop in Paris

Full-size mirrors in the back multiply the rows of arches in Gouret’s design for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

 

For the La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding shop, just moments from Left Bank Paris landmarks such as Café de Flore, there was no point competing with the glamour of Boulevard Saint-Germain. Instead, architect and designer Mickaël Gouret (@mickael_gouret) transformed a slightly dowdy shop into a 1,700-square-foot grand promenade.

Gouret tucked lighting between the exposed ceiling beams of the second floor’s mattress showroom. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

 

“I wanted something from the classical image people have of Paris,” Gouret says. “So, the arches are perfectly aligned to the new main entrance of the shop. The central part of the shop is then given over to a bed. And the landscape hierarchy is very low so that the bed is always visible from the outside, but also from the other side of the street.”

Read More: Kokaistudios Builds a City for Assemble by Réel’s Shanghai Concept Store

A sea-blue rug by Ege offers drama, ramped up by a vivid red rug by Prevotat that runs up the curved staircase of the same color to a second-floor expanse of mattress options. A few of Roger Tallon’s Cryptogamme stools dot the sales floor, the ideal spot to rest and dream up plans for the future.

A bold red staircase unites the two floors of La Chambre by Royal Hermitage in Paris’s Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.
Niches backed in blue display merchandise above storage boxes made of marble. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.
The interiors of the arches are covered in Nobilis’s unwoven satin wallpaper. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

Read More: Cass Calder Smith Designs Sarah Jessica Parker’s Second Shoe Store in NYC

Continue reading Mickaël Gouret Goes Classic for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding Shop in Paris

10 of the Most Influential Works by I.M. Pei

I.M Pei, the internationally celebrated architect whose work spanned seven decades, died May 16 in New York. Inducted into the Interior Design Hall of Fame in 2017, Pei was a modernist whose striking works included notable cultural institutions and civic buildings. Here are 10 significant builds.

> Read the full obituary here

1. East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, 1978

Photography by John Nicolais/Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania.

 

The East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC by I.M. Pei & Partners features two triangular buildings joined by a sky-lit central atrium and totaling 604,000 square feet. The project was named one of America’s Ten Best Buildings by the American Institute of Architects in 1986 and later given its 25 Year Award in 2004. 

2. Expansion of the Musée du Louvre in Paris, 1989 

Photography by Stéphane Couturier.

 

The project to modernize and expand the Louvre museum in Paris was undertaken by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects with the mission to leave the historic palace structure unchanged. The solution was a completely new entrance in the central courtyard—beneath a modern glass pyramid—that unites the galleries in the Louvre’s three wings. The design received numerous awards and accolades after its debut as well as the American Institute of Architects’ 25 Year Award in 2017.

3. New York’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 1986

Photography by Thorney Lieberman.

 

James Ingo Freed, then a partner at I.M. Pei & Partners, was the lead designer on the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, a building familiar to those who have attended trade shows and other events there, but also to all New Yorkers. Overlooking the Hudson River in Midtown Manhattan, the 1.6 million-square-foot Javits Center features the 15-story Crystal Palace.  

4. Suspension Bridge, 1997

Photography by Higashide Photo Studio.

 

Located in Koka City, Japan, this suspension bridge over a valley connects to an entry tunnel at I.M. Pei Architect’s Miho Museum, 80 percent of which is located underground to preserve the region’s natural beauty. Visitors must first pass through a tunnel and then this bridge before arriving at the museum, designed with limestone walls and a multi-angled glass roof. 

5. Luce Memorial Chapel, 1963

Photography courtesy of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects.

Located on the campus of Tungai University in Taichung, Taiwan, this Christian chapel was designed by  I.M. Pei  at the time his firm was known as I.M. Pei & Associates, in collaboration with Chen Chi-Kwan. The walls were constructed by local craftsmen of reinforced concrete, are 63-feet tall, and are covered in glazed, diamond-shaped tiles.

6. Bank of China tower, 1989

Photography by Paul Warchol.

When in Hong Kong, it’s impossible not to notice the 72-story Bank of China Tower, designed by Pei Cobb Freed in 1989. Its exterior is clad in glass and mirrors that reflect the ever-changing sky and marked by distinctive X’s. Designed with a composite structural system of steel and concrete, the 1.4-million-square-foot building received the China Tall Building Legacy Award in 2016.

7. Fragrant Hill Hotel, 1982

Photography by Marc Riboud.

Located outside of Beijing, the Fragrant Hill Hotel was I.M. Pei’s first project in his native China. The build, by I.M. Pei & Partners, is a low-rise construction set around courtyards and designed to preserve the natural rocks and trees on the site.

8. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, 1995

Photography by Timothy Hursley.

Pei was the lead designer on this Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects project set on four acres on the coast of Lake Erie in Cleveland. The design for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum combines simple geometric forms: a cantilevered theater balanced by a circular performance drum with a 165-foot orthogonal tower rising from the water to anchor a tetrahedral glass tent. 

9. Miho Institute of Aesthetics Chapel, 2012

Photography by Higashide Photo Studio.

Located in Shigaraki, Japan, the Miho Institute of Aesthetics Chapel by I.M. Pei Architect features more than 8,000 Japanese red cedar planks on its soaring interior walls and 51 custom stainless-steel panels on its tear-drop-shaped exterior. It was Pei’s last significant work. 

10. Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, 1989

Photography courtesy of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Featuring an outward-looking lobby, the an a 2,000-seat inward-facing concert hall, the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas’s Arts District was designed as both a pleasing place to make and listen to music as well as an inviting spot to gather in between performances. It received a National Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in 1991.

Read more: Paul Goldberger on I.M. Pei at 100

Continue reading 10 of the Most Influential Works by I.M. Pei

Five Emerging Interior Designers From Around the World

Tristan Auer

Tristan Auer Studio

Paris

Tristan Auer’s design makes the interplay of art and architecture the focal point of a Paris apartment, which serves as his design studio. Photo by Yann Deret

 

Elegant, understated and comfortably timeless, Tristan Auer’s interiors are the epitome of Parisian chic.

The 47-year-old Mr. Auer, who honed his skills while working with Christian Liaigre and Philippe Starck, set up his eponymous studio in Paris in 2002. He was commissioned to decorate Coco Chanel’s Paris apartments on rue Cambon probably that same year.

Three years ago, he opened Wilson Associates’ first European office, which focuses on the luxury hospitality market.

Mr. Auer was one of four interior designers chosen to work on the renovation of Paris’s 18th-century Hotel de Crillon, a project that was heralded by Architectural Digest magazine. That and his other residential, commercial and hospitality projects around the world led to his being named Maison & Objet’s 2017 Designer of the Year.

“Interior design is all about layout and flow,” he said. “Decoration is about color and style. I’m not that interested in decoration.”

Mr. Auer, who also designs furniture and lighting, insists that he doesn’t have a signature style, saying he’s inspired by each client’s likes and lifestyle.

Tristan Auer tailors his interiors to the likes and lifestyles of his clients. Photo by Vincent Leroux

“I consider myself a tailor,” he said. “I’m doing a suit not for myself but for them. Each suit will be designed to fit one client perfectly, but all of them will be elegant, comfortable, audacious and of course, modern.”

For Mr. Auer, each project is a psychological study.

“I work to understand not what my clients want but what they need,” he said. “The perfect space will change your life and your relationships. I start each story with people; it’s always a surprise because I never know how it’s going to end up.”

Mr. Auer, who has done work for the royal family of Qatar, recently designed a small apartment for a couple in Paris. “The husband was from India and the wife was from Japan,” he said. “I adapt myself to all cultures, and the scale of the project doesn’t matter. I learn from every project.”

Mr. Auer, a graduate of the ESAG Penninghen school of art direction and interior architecture in  Paris, has always been attracted to beautiful objects. “I cannot live in an environment that doesn’t please my eyes,” he said.

In his own Paris home, he hung a 1910 tapestry depicting fairytales opposite his bed. “It’s the first thing I see every day and the last thing I see every night,” he said. “Its composition is perfect—the harmonious interplay of proportions, objects and colors makes me happy.”

Mr. Auer is working on residential projects in London and New York City as well as on his own newly purchased home in the countryside outside Paris.

Tristan Auer tailors his interiors to the likes and lifestyles of his clients. Photo by Vincent Leroux

Natasha Baradaran

Natasha Baradaran Interior Design

Los Angeles

Contemporary art and casual, comfortable furniture set the tone for a living room Natasha Baradaran designed in a Brentwood, California, home. Photo by Roger Davies

Natasha Baradaran started her career with the iconic firm Wilson Associates. Photo by Roger Davies

The past and the present reside beautifully together in the casually elegant interiors that Los Angeles-based designer Natasha Baradaran creates.

“My aesthetic is about a mix,” said Ms. Baradaran, who is in her 40s. “It’s a combination of vintage finds, contemporary arts and my own furniture collection in order to create unique spaces that reflect the homeowner. Vintage pieces feel timeless and fresh next to contemporary pieces. I strive to create work that is fresh, sophisticated and relevant.”

Ms. Baradaran, who had done projects in London, Aspen, New York and Montecito, California, in addition to Los Angeles, often finds the past in her own present: She collects many of her vintage objects in Milan, Italy, where she has a summer house.

“I’m inspired by the Italian expression ‘la dolce far niente,’ which means ‘the sweetness of doing nothing,’” she said. “I especially love Robertaebasta, which has the best of Italian vintage presented by decades in four different stores in the heart of the city’s Brera design district.”

If her designs draw deeply from a variety of inspirations, it’s because of her own eclectic background. “They are an amalgamation of L.A. lifestyle, my Middle-Eastern heritage and my time in Italy,” she said.

Natasha Baradaran started her career with the iconic firm Wilson Associates. Photo by Roger Davies

No matter how sophisticated or refined, her interiors are designed to be lived in. “L.A. has always been a part of me and my aesthetic,” she said. “The casualness and approachability of my interiors, regardless of how grand or formal, is something inherent in me since I am a native Angeleno.”

Ms. Baradaran took her first interior design courses at UCLA while waiting to start a doctoral program in international relations.

“I was a newly married homeowner,” she said, “and I thought it would be fun.”

Ms. Baradaran, who opened the interior design studio that bears her name in 2000, started her career with the iconic firm Wilson Associates, where she worked on residential and hospitality projects.

Her work has been featured in numerous magazines ranging from Architectural Digest to Elle Décor, and she has received several awards and accolades. She won the 2012 “Star on the Rise” award from West Hollywood’s Pacific Design Center and in 2013 was included in The Hollywood Reporter’s list of the “25 Most Influential Interior Designers in Hollywood.”

In addition to interiors, Ms. Baradaran designs furniture and textiles. “I see these as three different arms,” she said. “Each arm infuses another and could not exist without the other. To really understand my point of view as an interior designer, each practice is a piece of a complete story.”

New projects include a beach house in Montecito, a penthouse in Century City, California, and a townhouse in New York City. Her latest fabric collection launches in the fall.

“The collection plays with outmoded ideas of masculinity and femininity that have been placed on materiality, such as the perception that a fragile material is feminine or a bold one is masculine,” she said.

Ashley Darryl

Ashley Darryl Interiors

New York City

Large-scale abstract art and colored window frames give a classic contemporary look to a living room designed by Ashley Darryl in a 19th-century house in Clinton Corners, New York. Photo by Marco Ricca

Ashley Darryl’s contemporary classical interiors are designed to be timeless.

“When you look at my projects, you can’t tell when I did them,” she said. “Neither can I.”

Ms. Darryl, 37, who opened her eponymous studio in Manhattan in 2014, artfully mixes old and new pieces to help stop the ticking of the clock.

“I love the story behind each vintage piece,” she said. “I like to know that someone loved it and enjoyed it through the years. These pieces catch the eye in a room. No one can duplicate some of the things I’ve created because the pieces are unique.”

Ms. Darryl, who was named a Next Wave Designer by House Beautiful in 2014 and a Rising Star by the New York Chapter of the International Furnishings and Design Association in 2017, has an interesting history.

Ashley Darryl in her New York City apartment. Photo by Allyson Lubow

The daughter of an interior designer, she never thought about going into the field. Instead, she studied art history at Southern Methodist University and did graduate studies at Sotheby’s, where she learned about antiques. An internship with an interior designer through that program shifted her focus.

“I was obsessed with interior design,” she said.

After working for Jeff Lincoln Interiors in New York City for seven years, she opened Ashley Darryl Interiors.

Ms. Darryl, whose work has been featured in Architectural Digest, The New York Times, House Beautiful, Vogue and Domino, draws inspiration from a variety of design icons, notably Jeff Lincoln, Billy Baldwin, Steven Gambrel, Jacques Adnet and David Hicks.

And also from her own past. “My mother used to take me to flea markets,” she said. “And I used to bring my finds home rearrange my room every other day.”

Her Texas upbringing also plays into her designs. “I grew up half a year on a horse ranch, so I like bringing greenery into a room,” she said. “It brings life to the cold concrete of New York City. And it makes the space and the people in it feel better.”

Ashley Darryl in her New York City apartment. Photo by Allyson Lubow

Bryan O’Sullivan

Bryan O’Sullivan Studio

London

In a Fifth Avenue apartment in New York City, Bryan O’Sullivan created bespoke tables to complement the walnut bed by architect Annabelle Selldorf. Vintage pieces, including a 1937 Venini mirror and Roberto Giulio Rida table lamps, add a relaxed sense of glamour to the space. Photo by James McDonald

Bryan O’Sullivan opened his London studio in 2013. Photo by Mark Cocksedge

Since opening his namesake design studio in London in 2013, Bryan O’Sullivan has completed a variety of residential and commercial projects around the world.

His designs, which he describes as “timeless and elegant, homey yet cutting-edge stylish,” are bespoke and personalized.

“We design everything from lighting to furniture, which adds more layers to the uniqueness of these spaces,” he said.

The 36-year-old Mr. O’Sullivan, who is from Kenmare in County Kerry in Southern Ireland, worked for Selldorf Architects in New York; David Collins and Martin Brudnizki in London; and Luis Laplace in Paris after he studied architecture at the University of Westminster.

Bryan O’Sullivan opened his London studio in 2013. Photo by Mark Cocksedge

“I look up to Annabelle Selldorf,” he said. “She is an incredible architect/designer, and she always strikes the right balance of beauty, elegance and art.”

His studio, which he started in his bedroom, now occupies two floors in a London office that houses a team of 20.

As a young designer, he strives to offer a “fresh perspective” that takes his clients’ needs and wants into account.

Mr. O’Sullivan takes inspiration from a variety of sources, including the beauty of his native Ireland.

“My parents’ house has big floor-to-ceiling windows looking out on the bay,” he said, “and I was always interested in the idea of creating spaces both architecturally and internally and the connection with the outside from a young age.”

He recently completed a four-and-a-half-year restoration of an 11,000-square-foot townhouse in Paris, a penthouse apartment overlooking Central Park in New York City, a ski chalet at the  Courchevel resort in the French Alps and several yachts in the Mediterranean.

Mr. O’Sullivan has done projects for several hotels, including the Berkeley in London, The Green on St. Stephen’s Green park in Dublin, the Tamburlaine in Cambridge, England, and the LAVIDA at the Catalunya Resort in Girona, Spain.

He’s developing a bespoke lighting and furniture collection and is looking forward to adding textile design to his oeuvre.

Andrew Sun

Atelier SUN

Toronto

Live bamboo trees, which have become Andrew Sun’s signature, were used at the Courtyard House in Toronto to blur the lines between indoors and outdoors. Photo by Chao Chen

Architectural and interior designer Andrew Sun creates naturalistic, minimalist spaces that explore spatial relationships and the interplay of light and shadow.

“My heart lies more in the architectural field,” he said. “I strive to cut to bone in my design to seek the balance point where there is nothing to add and nothing to take away.”

Mr. Sun, 35, who graduated from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2008 and established his boutique atelier in 2013, is best known for the Courtyard House, an award-winning home he designed and decorated that features his signature statement: live trees planted in the living space.

“I like to divide spaces into multiple areas to create smaller spaces and use live trees and plants as dividers,” he said. “It’s like designing a village, and it gives a treehouse feeling.”

Andrew Sun started his career with an architectural firm. Photo by Jean Su

The greenery is meant to complement Mr. Sun’s use of natural materials, notably wood flooring and stairs. “I want to create a connection to nature,” he said. “Tiles and concrete are too cold.”

He said the idea of bringing nature inside is particularly appealing to his clients in the Greater Toronto Area, where the cold and snow make it impossible to enjoy the outdoors for great lengths of time.

For commercial projects, he takes inspiration from the local culture, the clients’ identity and the particular use of the building. “I always embed a little surprise,” he said. “I want the design to evolve when the user interacts with it.”

At a newly constructed hand-pulled noodle restaurant in Toronto, for example, he took inspiration from the noodle-making process and hung cutting boards on the ceiling.

“The space is very long and narrow, and the client didn’t think the very end of the restaurant would attract many customers,” Mr. Sun said. “We applied different finishes on each side of the cutting boards, so the moment customers look back, they see a completely different restaurant. The further you are inside the restaurant, the greater the effect is.”

Mr. Sun, who started his career in an interior design firm and worked in the interior design division of an architectural firm, soon will be a licensed architect.

Andrew Sun started his career with an architectural firm. Photo by Jean Su

Continue reading Five Emerging Interior Designers From Around the World

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