Tag Archives: Non-Profit Organization

Indian Artist Uses Sunlight To Project Phrases Exploring Theories of Time Onto The Street

Daku is an Indian graffiti artist from Delhi who is known for his typographic street art installations, criticizing consumerism and various social issues. For his latest project, he cooperated with an Indian non-profit organization St+art India and created a mesmerizing installation called ‘Theory Of Time’ in Panjim, Goa.

This temporary art installation utilizes sunlight to cast shadows of letters across on the street, displaying a message about the passing of time. The words “Time works wonders. Time moves. Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind. Time fades. Time is an illusion” are cast when the sun is in zenith and St+art India describe the piece as a “multifaceted gameful interpretation of time itself, that gives no answers but posits new questions.”

Check out Daku’s new art piece in the gallery below!

More info: DAKU | St+art India | h/t: Colossal

“Time works wonders. Time moves.”

“Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind.”

“Time fades. Time is an illusion,” says Daku’s message

The art installation aims to highlight the temporality of time

Daku does not aim to answer questions – he aims to raise new ones

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Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!

Rescuers Organize A Maternity Photoshoot For This Adorable Pit Bull To Help Her Get Adopted Faster

Pit bulls (not Pitbulls) have quite a negative reputation in the canine world as being scary and aggressive. However, this couldn’t be farther from the truth. With proper training and care, they can be just as adorable as any other breed of dog – just take Mama Pickles for example. This adorable 2-year-old pit bull was found wandering the streets back in early September. The people who found her instantly noticed that the dog was pregnant and tried finding her owners. Eventually, they succeeded only to be told that the owners don’t want her anymore, so Pickles ended up in a shelter.

2-year-old pit bull Pickles was found on the streets back in September

Image credits: Enchanted Hills Photography

The pregnant pit bull was eventually picked up by the Pits & Giggles Rescue, a non-profit organization that specializes in caring for pregnant dogs and their puppies. Even though Pickles had a huge belly, she was excitedly jumping around and couldn’t wait to meet her rescue friends.

The previous owners got rid of the dog after finding out she was pregnant

Image credits: Pits And Giggles Rescue

“Pits & Giggles Rescue has a mission like no other. They specialize in Maternity rescue and care,” said  Pits & Giggles volunteer Lauren Casteen Sykes in an interview with Bored Panda. “They save pregnant and nursing mama dogs from shelter and provide them with the care they need to bring their babies safely into the world. Prior to adoption, Mama and all puppies are fixed and are placed in the best homes according to their personality and needs!”

Pickles was picked up by the Pits & Giggles Rescue

Image credits: Enchanted Hills Photography

Lauren is not only a volunteer at Pits & Giggles but also the avid photographer behind Enchanted Hills Photography. She decided to organize a maternity photoshoot for Pickles to give her and her babies more exposure. “When Pits & Giggles reached out saying that they just brought in a Mama from the shelter that was the proudest, happy and caring little thing, we wanted to take photos to keep those precious moments,” said the photographer.

Photographer Lauren Casteen Sykes gave Mama Pickles an adorable maternity photoshoot

Image credits: Enchanted Hills Photography

Pickles seemed very excited about the photoshoot and was happily posing for the camera. “She’s quite the model. Her legs are certainly too short for the runway, but she was really loving all the attention and affection,” said Lauren. “The most challenging part was getting Pickles to stop licking us! She wanted pets, pats, and belly rubs. She was just loving this new thing called “love”. She was so excited she could hardly sit still!”

Pickles gave birth not long after the photoshoot so Lauren organized a follow-up

Image credits: Enchanted Hills Photography

After Pickles gave birth, Lauren organized another photoshoot where the pit bull was proudly posing with her freshly baked batch of adorable puppies. “This girly was clearly used repeatedly for breeding and we’re excited to make sure this is her very last litter,” explained Lauren.

The pit bull was just as happy and adorable as before

Image credits: Enchanted Hills Photography

Lauren has been volunteering for Pits & Giggles for about two years now and says that she has adopted a dog herself during that time. “Three years ago, my husband Brad and I adopted our first rescue dog. Her name was Remington Rose! We turned that sweet girl’s life around for the better and it really opened up our hearts to help other dogs too,” said the photographer.

People loved the adorable photoshoot





Aušrys Uptas

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

HOW HEALTHCARE DESIGNERS CAN USE EVIDENCE TO CREATE OPTIMAL HEALING ENVIRONMENTS

Posted on 03/29/2018Jane Rohde

 

Evidence-based design was developed and supported by The Center for Health Design (The Center), which is currently celebrating its 25th year as a non-profit organization. The Center is based on promoting research, education, and advocacy for the design of successful healthcare environments and has developed various “toolboxes” and issue briefs as resources for using EBD principles for innovative solutions.

EBD TOOLBOX: BEHAVIORAL & MENTAL HEALTH

The Center has recently released a Behavioral & Mental Health (BMH) Toolbox, which has been developed because 45 percent of patients admitted to a hospital for a medical condition or who visit an emergency department also have a concurrent BMH condition. This toolbox is complementary to the addition of a chapter on substance abuse treatment centers included in the 2018 Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities.

POTENTIAL DESIGN STRATEGIES FOR SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTS: BEHAVIORAL & MENTAL HEALTH

  • A homelike, de-institutionalized environment supportive of patient autonomy and control over a personal environment
  • An environment that is well-maintained and well-organized
  • Noise control
  • Support of privacy
  • Access to daylight and views of nature
  • Physical access to the outdoors
  • Support of personal safety/security
  • Support for social interaction
  • Positive distraction

This listing of design strategies is applicable to all types of healing environments and can work for emergency rooms, outpatient settings, and hospitals. These approaches continue to be successfully utilized in senior living settings including memory care facilities, providing not only positive outcomes for residents but also staff, family members, and visitors. It is time for the crossover and integration of all environments that provide care, support, and services to consider the complexities of the care populations being served and person-centered approaches for all constituents and stakeholders. 

Intimacy is not typically a term utilized when describing healthcare settings. However, an individual’s health and well-being are extremely personal. If design was approached from an intimate level—looking at each personal human interaction from the entry sequence through meeting with care providers, being admitted, family visits, and subsequent follow-up—it would provide context for developing smaller-scaled spaces with good acoustics, lighting levels to support various personal or group tasks, wayfinding systems, and the needs for respite in a quiet outdoor space or a sun room.

A HEALING EXAMPLE: THE WAITING ROOM

During programming and planning, we talk about the function of what occurs in an area or room but often do not address actual examples of personal interactions that may occur within a certain space. For example, let’s take a waiting room with tables, chairs, maybe a TV and possibly vending machines. Consider a scenario in which a couple arrives and is directed to a waiting room and a doctor comes out with sad news: a diagnosis of cancer for a loved one, a death of a friend, or the loss of a child. That waiting room is now a place where sad information must be delivered. An adjacent private space, an opportunity to have a glass of water, and access to the outside for a breather should be considered based upon the human interaction.

The waiting room isn’t just a waiting room—it is a place where a full spectrum of emotions from sadness to joy is delivered. It is a place where family members come together. It can offer overnight accommodations or it can be a place where a meal is consumed. Identifying the personal interactions allow for the design to be so much more than a waiting room but a place of comfort scaled to accommodate the privacy needs of patients’ family members and friends.

If this framework were utilized as a health and wellness overlay in a BIM model, think of what could be identified as conflicts; this could affect the size and scale of lobbies and amenities offered, the sizing of patient rooms, and simplifying point-of-service operational flows to accommodate staff. We think of BIM models as identifying conflicts with building systems but what if it were expanded to identify places of human interaction? This is a tool that helps address person-centered design based upon the research that establishes the framework for decision making and relevant design strategies to fulfill the intimate needs required of a space.

The Terasaki Research Institute, completed by Atelier Hitoshi Abe in Los Angeles near UCLA’s campus, exemplifies the need to address human interaction and caring. The institute focuses on organ transplants and wanted an innovative and engaging space. The beautiful interior atrium provides access to daylight supporting human interaction—learning, working, and holding public events within the space. Acoustics and seating arrangements were addressed to accommodate the various uses while supporting human comfort.

The utilization of openings throughout the two stories of mezzanines provides wayfinding landmark placements and opportunities for daylighting and engagement, giving the spaces a sense of place while connecting to the outside and vice versa.

To coin a new phrase, the “environmental program for human interaction” could become another way to support person-centered healthcare projects with human-to-human interaction being the evaluation and overlay in planning and designing healthcare environments of the future. 


Jane Rohde is the founding Principal of JSR Associates, Inc. located in Catonsville, Md.  The firm celebrates 22 years of consulting services in 2018. She champions a global cultural shift toward de-institutionalizing senior living and healthcare facilities through person-centered principles, research and advocacy, and design of the built environment. Clientele includes non-profit and for-profit developers, government agencies, senior living and healthcare providers, and design firms.  Rohde was the recipient of the 2015 Environments for Aging Changemaker Award and speaks internationally on senior living, aging, healthcare, evidence-based design, and sustainability.  For more information or comments, please contact Jane Rohde at jane@jsrassociates.net or “Chat with Jane” at www.jsrassociates.net

Photography: Roland Halbe
Architect: Atelier Hitoshi Abe

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