Tag Archives: Nigeria

Fed Up With All The Bad News, This Artist Illustrated The 50 Best Ones From 2019

Fed up with hearing about all the bad news, Italian artist Mauro Gatti decided to look on the bright side and started The Happy Broadcast – an “anxiety-free” Instagram account where he illustrates the best positive news. “We are often bombarded with fear-mongering and shocking headlines that make us feel that the world is falling apart,” says the artist. “However, while it’s important to report on problems and issues, I believe there is so much good in this world that it needs to be found and promoted just as widely.”

When he’s working on The Happy Broadcast, Mauro tries to pick the news that has an international appeal and includes themes like animal rights, climate change, and science. He believes that we need more positive news to realize that the world is getting better, even if it’s only little by little.

More info: Instagram

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The artist believes that negative news is dominating the media because it’s more compelling than little improvements. “Bad things can happen quickly, but good things aren’t built in a day, and as they unfold, they’re out of sync with the news cycle,” says Mauro.

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“As humans, we have this thing called “negative bias” that make us respond quicker to bad or dangerous situations,” says the artist. “Nowadays, this bias is getting in the way of our happiness and well-being, and even our productivity because most of the narrative surrounding us (print, online or mobile) is that the “world is ending”.”

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Mauro believes we should find a balance between positive and negative news. “From politics to climate change and economy, negative and bad news surrounds us everywhere we go. A potential solution could be to limit the amount of bad news, basically slow down our personal news cycle, adding some positive news to our “news diet” to make sure that our outlook on the world is more optimistic,” says the artist. “Also, it’s very important to invest time to deal with misinformation and the reliability of news sources.”

Check out some of Mauro’s illustrations of positive news in the gallery below!

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Aušrys Uptas

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

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London’s ‘Color Palace’ is the jolt of energy architecture needs

The installation celebrates vibrant Nigerian textiles and experimental engineering

colorful installation in LondonAdam Scott

In the textile markets of Lagos, Nigeria, bolts of vividly hued fabric are stacked far as the eye can see. They’re often neatly wrapped, waiting for shoppers to unfurl them and reveal their vibrant geometric patterns. These markets inspired the Color Palace, a new pavilion British-Nigerian designer Yinka Ilori and the firm Pricegorecreated for the London Festival of Architecture and Dulwich Picture Gallery.

colorful installation in LondonAdam Scott

The temporary pavilion is an enormous, prismatic slatted cube raised on four stocky red columns that are actually old drainage pipes. The cube’s space frame is composed of wood battens that are all the exact same size. Ilori painted a geometric motif on the facade, with each batten receiving a different color on each side.

This yields an optical illusion: Walking around the pavilion makes it appear like the colors morph, like a lenticular print. When visitors ascend a magenta staircase, they’re totally immersed in the structure and can see, up close, how everything is assembled.

Adam Scott
Adam Scott

“[The pavilion’s] patterns and shapes calmly welcome you from a distance until you get closer and closer, and you’re blown away with an explosion of color that immediately demands your attention,” Ilori said in a news release.

Ilori is best known for designing upcycled furniture, which he paints with bold colors and reupholsters with Nigerian fabrics to symbolize traditional parables. The Color Palace extends that sensibility to a much greater scale that allows him to communicate with people in a more immersive way.

Adam Scott

“The beauty of working on a larger scale is that I am able to tell a more powerful and compelling narrative, allowing the audience to interact and engage with the structure externally and internally,” Ilori tells Curbed.

“Color Palace” is the a jolt of energy architecture needs: It’s a compelling installation that’s both culturally specific and universally expressive, and invites people to learn more about creative engineering techniques. The pavilion is the antithesis of unapproachable, stark, white cubes that have come to be the stereotype of modern architecture—and it’s invigorating.

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