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Tag Archives: New York

Pelle Transforms New York Showroom into “Unnatural Habitat”

Pelle’s “Unnatural Habitat” setting is on display through June 28. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

New York-native brand Pelletransformed its Flatiron showroom-atelier into a dream-like setting with cream carpet and subtly shifting shades of pale yellow curtains offsetting its new works. Design duo Jean and Oliver Pelle (at left) call the installation Unnatural Habitat.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

The scene-stealing Nana Lure, a continuation of the Lure lighting collection initially launched in 2016, dominates the space with its large-scale banana frond shade cast in cotton and painted in sumptuous purples and greens. Two fixtures with patinated stepped spines suspend from boat hardware and leather straps made in collaboration with friend and leather designer Jason Ross of Artemas Quibble. The effect is pure tropical fantasy.

> See the NYCxDESIGN 2019 Event Calendar

Nana Lure and Fin Chair by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

Also not to be missed: Dust, a suspended arrangement of reflective shards producing a hazy ambient light and evoking a post-apocalypse world where shiny fragments become treasures. Is this the next wave? Final touches include Pelle’s solid aluminum DVN table with its precise zero-tolerance leg joints plus elevated timber and brass stool/tables from the Stiletto series that Jean describes as “the best way to present wood” with mesmerizing grain patterns on full display. The set-up is on view from May 15 to June 28 at 56 West 22nd St.

Dust, a suspended arrangement of glass shards, by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.
DVN table by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN 2019

Continue reading Pelle Transforms New York Showroom into “Unnatural Habitat”

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The 15 Most Expensive Zip Code In The United States

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11962: Bridgehampton, New York

This nine-bedroom home, which sits on 20 acres and is reportedly owned by Christie Brinkley, is being offered for $29.5 million. (The market for luxury Hamptons real estate is so strong that last week Zillow Group launched Out East, a website devoted to the region with listings and town guides.)

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94027: Atherton, California

The suburb is the most expensive place to live in Silicon Valley. Here’s what $17.5 million will get you there (spoiler alert: five bedrooms).

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90210: Beverly Hills, California

This $70-million estate includes a 20,000-square-foot main house, a 7,000-square-foot guest house, stables, riding rings, and a tennis court.

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33109: Fisher Island, Florida

Located three miles offshore from Miami, Fisher Island was once the private home of William K. Vanderbilt. In the 2000 census, it had the highest per-capita income in the United States.

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94301: Palo Alto, California

An empty lot on less than 3/10 of an acre? That’ll be $5.4 million.

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11976: Water Mill, New York

A 42-acre estate originally built for the Ford family could be yours for $175 million.

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94022: Palo Alto, California

94022 includes parts of Palo Alto and Los Altos including Westwind Community Barn, shown here.

94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

92067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

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94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

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90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

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94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

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10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

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90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

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93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

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2067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

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11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

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HOUSE TOUR: Bunny Williams Transforms A Homely A-Frame Into An Inspiring Studio Space

With 22 bucolic acres, Bunny Williams was only missing one thing at her legendary Connecticut retreat: an inspiring work studio where she could be her fiercely creative self. No longer.

 

Continue reading HOUSE TOUR: Bunny Williams Transforms A Homely A-Frame Into An Inspiring Studio Space

A Former Chicago Project Will Become A Museum Dedicated To Public Housing

When Chicago launched a massive plan in 2000 to overhaul all public housing in the city–knocking down high-rises like Cabrini-Green and slowly rebuilding new communities–residents resisted. They didn’t want to lose their homes, or the tight-knit communities that had formed over decades. But as the plan moved forward, they rallied around a new goal: to save one building to tell their stories and preserve local history.

The National Public Housing Museum will open in 2019 in Little Italy on the city’s Near West Side, in a building that was part of a New Deal development built in the 1930s as the first federal housing project in Chicago.

[Image: National Public Housing Museum /Holabird Jane Addams Homes]

“This is the dream of public housing residents to preserve their stories and to preserve the space,” says Robert Smith, associate director of the museum organization. “The demolition of spaces, of homes, of communities, instigated the activism around saving a particular space for the stories.”

The museum has been in planning since 2007 and was inspired, in part, by the Tenement Museum in New York, which recreates public housing experiences from an earlier time, and offered mentorship to the NPHM team. Inside the building in Chicago, visitors will see inside three apartments restored based on oral histories from three families who lived there at different points in time. The Medor family, who moved into the building when it was new, were a Russian-Jewish family who lost family members in Europe and came to Chicago to start over. Another apartment will memorialize the experience of the Rizzi family, Italian-Americans headed by a single mother who relied on the public housing of the time as a safe place for her children. A third apartment tells the story of the Hatch family, African-Americans who moved into the development in the 1960s.

[Image: National Public Housing Museum/The Hatch Family]

In galleries in other parts of the building, the museum will explore current debates around affordable housing and issues including gentrification, violence in cities, and the persistence of racial segregation. “I think a lot of museums are agnostic on politics, or apolitical,” says Smith. “There’s an idea that museums can’t advocate in the policy realm, and we just don’t think that’s true.” The new museum aims to bring together artists and scholars with the people most affected by housing policy, and host discussions that can help shape the future of that policy.

Until the museum opens in its new space–a long process that involved zoning changes and dealing with local politics, and also will involve restoring a space that has been abandoned for years and decomposing in harsh Chicago weather–the organization has been hosting a series of events elsewhere.

[Image: Landon Bone Baker Architects]

“It’s a museum in the streets,” Smith says. “It’s a museum that has found space in the cracks and crevices of the city to tell stories.” A current exhibition, Housing as a Human Right: Social Construction, focuses on the Jane Addams Homes, the development that included the building where the new museum will be launched. It brings visitors back to the years after the Great Depression, when public housing–along with social security, libraries and bridges, and funding for the arts–became a priority for the federal government.

“That sort of sense of the public good from the highest level is something that I think we’ve lost,” says Smith, pointing to Roosevelt’s proposed second bill of rights, which included the right of every family to a decent home. “He understands that you can’t guarantee the first bill of rights, our political rights, without guaranteeing economic rights.”

Smith hopes that the museum will help visitors rethink public housing–both its original promise, and how it is defined. 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is also public housing; so, in a sense, is every house owned by people who claim a tax break on their mortgage interest. The mortgage interest deduction cost the U.S. $77 billion in 2016; far more than went to “public housing,” Section 8 vouchers, or other programs for low-income Americans.

The organization also plans to work with local entrepreneurs in a small business incubator designed for public housing residents. A curriculum will teach about the history of entrepreneurship in the community–including successful co-ops, like a general store in the 1940s that redistributed union-level wages to resident members.

The museum store will itself be a cooperative owned and operated by public housing residents, serving as a living model for visitors to experience.

“We think that public housing residents, and poor and working-class people who have been on the margins, who tried to make ends meet in the informal economy actually have a lot to teach the rest of us about ways to think the economy anew,” Smith says. “We want to help facilitate those conversations and disseminate the knowledge that public housing residents have always wielded to a broader audience.”

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THE WILLIAMSBURG HOTEL, NEW YORK

The Williamsburg Hotel

Located at the prime corner of Wythe Avenue and North 10th Street, Brooklyn, New York, the hotel has been designed as an after-dark hub with a restaurant, rooftop pool, the neighbourhood’s first grand ballroom, and three distinct bars, including one in a replica water tower built to pay homage to the block’s historic, now defunct, wooden water tower factory.

The hotel will open in phases: its richly tiled-and-textured guestrooms and cosy lobby bar opened in January 2017, and a restaurant will launch this winter, followed by a rooftop pool, water tower bar, and Brooklyn’s first grand ballroom.

Continue reading THE WILLIAMSBURG HOTEL, NEW YORK

These Designs Have Made the World a Much Better Place

Helping others through the healing creativity of art is priceless. Whether it’s creating a sense of community among those displaced by war or spreading awareness about an imminent issue in the form of a mural, design in 2017 cultivated humanity in a year of ups and downs. Below are eight standout architectural and design contributions that will continue to change the world far beyond this year.

Photo: Courtesy of HQ Architects

Harugei Malchut, Tel Aviv, Israel

Designed by HQ Architects, led by architect Erez Ella, Harugei Malchut in Tel Aviv is the urban renewal project that is changing the face of Israel by conforming to the construction and preservation policy known as TAMA 38. Created by upgrading existing buildings to comply with new building policies around natural disasters and political conflicts, Harugei Malchut is putting forth a model that will help citizens to live in a modern and safe building affordably.

Photo: Courtesy of Groundswell

Summer Studio 2017, Brooklyn, New York

In a beautiful collaboration between Groundswell, a Brooklyn community arts nonprofit, and Gensler’s internship program, a stunning mural centered around immigration was installed at PS 373 this past summer called, “Flight of Freedom.”

Kachumbala Maternity Ward, Kachumbala, Uganda

As a country with limited access to healthcare, Uganda was the perfect place to construct a maternity ward for local residents in the city of Kachumbala. Taking into account the lack of access to electricity and clean water, HKS Architects made sure the structure would not be inhibited by these factors, building in a purifying system for rainwater and relying completely on solar power.

 
Photo: Courtesy of The Wing

The Wing SoHo, New York

Dubbed the “home base for women,” The Wing, a female-only members club, opened its second location in New York’s SoHo neighborhood this year. The open working spaces, stunning color-coded library, and witty tile work cultivate creative energy for women to come together and change the world.

Photo: Courtesy of CASS Community Social Service

Cass Community Tiny Homes, Detroit

These beautiful tiny homes not only work to fight homelessness in Detroit but also provide a unique rent-to-own opportunity, giving tenants a second chance to create a new life for themselves.

Photo: Courtesy of Gensler / © Tom Harris 2017

Thomas Hughes Children’s Library, Chicago

Featuring a brand-new redesign led by Gensler, the Thomas Hughes Children’s Library focuses on providing local Chicago children and families with state-of-the-art learning facilities, focusing on igniting the curiosity within children, inviting learning naturally.

 
Photo: Courtesy of Ealing Council

Marston Court, London

Constructed using old shipping containers, Marston Court in the London borough of Ealing is a 34-unit housing complex created for emergency housing and fighting the homeless epidemic, designed by both the Ealing Council and QED Property.

Photo: Credit Yannick Wegner, Mannheim

Refugee Camp Community Center, Mannheim, Germany

A group of architecture students from the University of Kaiserslautern built a stunning community center for a refugee camp in Mannheim. Over the course of three months, the students worked with refugees to design and build the lattice-front structure, creating a common space for residents to build a natural sense of community.

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The 9 Most Stunning Islands Off U.S. Shores

There’s no denying the allure of Santorini and Sardinia, but we’ve got plenty of idyllic islands to explore in our own backyard. From upscale enclaves favored by presidents and celebrities to low-key nature preserves teeming with wildlife, the best islands off U.S. shores are perfect for a summer getaway—no passport required.

Photo: Patrick O’Brien / Courtesy of Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Charleston is consistently ranked among the best cites in the U.S., so it should come as no surprise that Kiawah Island—where Charlestonians go in the summer—is one of the country’s most gorgeous islands. With ten miles of pristine beaches, legendary golf courses at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, and nature trails among the marshes, it’s the perfect place for a family vacation or romantic getaway.

Photo: Courtesy of Sunset Beach

Shelter Island, New York

When New Yorkers need to escape the concrete jungle, this island between the Hamptons and Long Island’s North Fork is one of the places they go. Buzzing with visitors in summer, it’s a blissfully unpretentious alternative to the Hamptons with plenty of rural charm. Find a dash of New York sophistication at Sunset Beach, a twenty-room hotel by André Balazs.

Photo: Dennis Frates / Alamy Stock Photo

Lanai, Hawaii

Pristine beaches, winding roads clinging to cliffs over the Pacific, volcanoes, and lush tropical landscapes—Hawaii’s islands draw vacationers from all over the U.S. As one of the smaller, more under-the-radar isles, Lanai boasts blissfully crowd-free beaches, dramatic cliffs, and luxe accommodations like the recently renovated Four Seasons Lanai.

 
Photo: Getty Images

Cumberland Island, Georgia

Georgia’s largest barrier island is an 18-mile stretch of undeveloped beaches and marshes teeming with wildlife, including shrimp, sea turtles, and alligators, not to mention the horses that roam the land. Protected by the National Park Service, the island’s natural beauty has been preserved. Pitch a tent or book a room at the comfortable Greyfield Inn.

Photo: Getty Images

Mackinac Island, Michigan

We wouldn’t blame you for mistaking Mackinac Island for the Caribbean—the water is the same vibrant shade of turquoise. This car-free stretch of land in Lake Huron feels like a blast from the past thanks to enchanting properties like Mission Point and the Grand Hotel, which have been welcoming guests for over a hundred years.

Photo: Getty Images

Gasparilla Island, Florida

The Florida Keys may be more famous, but that just means this barrier island off the Gulf Coast remains a secret hideaway for insiders. It’s been a low-key luxury vacation spot since J. P. Morgan and the Vanderbilts started visiting in the pre-Prohibition days. Check into the Gasparilla Inn for a taste of that Jazz Age life.

 
Photo: Getty Images

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

This idyllic New England enclave is the preferred vacation spot of preppy Bostonians and of presidential families including the Kennedys, the Clintons, and the Obamas. You’ll find plenty of historic charm, scenic lighthouses, beautiful beaches, and yachts. Rent a house like the locals do or stay at the funky new Summercamp by Lark Hotels.

Photo: Getty Images

Mount Desert Island, Maine

Thick pine forests, waves crashing against rocky cliffs, sandy beaches—this little island off the shores of Bar Harbor is the stuff summer-camp dreams are made of. Stay at the quaint Asticou Inn and spend your days hiking and swimming in Acadia National Park, whose carriage paths were commissioned by John D. Rockefeller.

Photo: Charity Burggraaf / Courtesy of the Willows Inn

Lummi Island, Washington

This little island in the Salish Sea off the coast of Washington state has become a pilgrimage site for foodies thanks to award-winning chef Blaine Wetzel’s must-try Pacific Northwest cuisine at the Willows Inn. Spend your days spotting orca whales and exploring the forests and coastline where Wetzel forages for ingredients that appear on your plate.

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