Tag Archives: New York

New Yorker Draws Sketches Of Masked Strangers On The Subway, Captures The Spirit Of The Times

Devon Rodriguez is known for his subway oil paintings of unsuspecting subjects. He has now taken to drawing sketches with a pencil while on the subway. His TikTok has several process videos of it, with some of them climbing over a few million views. The artist is also selling these sketches on his website if you’re interested in owning them.

Devon says that his work is about documenting the world around him, typically on the NYC Subway. His job is not to direct reality, but to let reality lead him. He likes to remain hyper-aware of what’s going on and tries not to disturb his subjects in any way.

More info: devonrodriguezart.com | Instagram | tiktok.com

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

The author has also told Bored Panda what it’s like to be drawing these people: “I’m curious about people, how they operate, what they wear, how they interact with the world around them, etc. Even when I’m not drawing, I’m watching people and thinking about their nuances and the different mannerisms that people adopt. They’re a perfect subject for me to draw. When I’m drawing, it’s like meditation. As I’m rendering their forms and clothing, I’m pondering things like ‘what does their body language say about them? How does the way they present themselves describe their psyche?’”

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

And Devon isn’t using his opportunity to draw these sketches just so he can practice the art that he’s been immersed in for 8 years—it’s more than that. “I see a greater meaning in this endeavor. The subway has been a subject of mine for several years now. Faces are a thing that I’m so used to capturing on the subway and now most of them are covered up with the COVID-19 masks. I think it’s interesting to capture this devastating moment in time with art. It’ll reflect 2020 when I look back on them in the future. It’ll be interesting to capture the different types of masks people wear and how they wear them.”

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

“I’m going to continue the sketch series for a while. I’ll be making one a day every day for the next few weeks, at least.” And since he’s not stopping any time soon, keep following him on his social media to get updates on the series.

TikTok Video by Devon Rodriguez

Image credits: devonrodriguezart

Devon Rodriguez in his studio in the Bronx, New York

Image credits: Jacob Pritchard

Devon Rodriguez was born in the Bronx, New York, and has been published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, and been featured in numerous other articles. His love for New York is evident in his artwork. He currently has a portrait of his mentor showing at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, and his self-portrait will be exhibiting at the Wausau Museum of Contemporary Art this fall.

Anyone can write on Bored Panda.Start writing!

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!Share on Facebook76 FollowDidi MenendezAuthor, Community member

I curate and publish artists and poets. Read more »

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My 12 Colorized Vintage Portraits Of LGBT Couples Show Beauty And Support For The LGBTQ+ Community

Hi, my name is Andrea and I’m a gay art director based in New York. A couple of years ago, I came across “The Invisibles,” a touching collection of vintage portraits of love and pride curated by Sebastien Lifshitz. I found these photos of gay lovers and friends so touching, and I realized at that moment that the LGBTQ+ community has a history too. And a beautiful one.

More info: Instagram

I asked myself if there was anything I could do to make this history visible and closer to the present day. That’s how I started to personally color them, trying to imagine what the real colors and tones might have been. It was my hope to do them justice, to show that we are connected to them, that love is strong and resilient and it will always win.

I created a dedicated page on Instagram where I’ll keep posting colorized images. If you have vintage images showing gay lovers and friends, I’ll be happy to colorize it for you via a $5 donation to the Trevor Project. Together, we can help build the future of the LGBTQ+ community through its past.

Anyone can write on Bored Panda.Start writing!

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!Share on Facebook54 FollowAndrea EraliAuthor, Community member

Art Director Read more »

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Amazing U-Shaped Skyscraper In New York Is Unveiled

Manhattan’s skyline is about to get thrown for a loop – literally. Plans have officially been unveiled to construct the world’s first U-shaped skyscraper in New York City, and it’s going to push the limits of architecture above the curve.

The Big Bend is an ambitious project being carried out by Oiio Studio, a world-renowned design team previously confronted by the city’s land usage restrictions. “If we manage to bend our structure instead of bending the zoning rules of New York we would be able to create one of the most prestigious buildings in Manhattan,” they wrote on their official website about their plan to circumvent the laws by building long instead of tall.

If carried out successfully, The Big Bend will end up becoming the longest building in the world, surpassing even Dubai’s Burj Khalifa in total length. The building will require an elevator system that can travel in loops and curves to scale its unique shape, which sounds somewhat like a rollercoaster. We don’t yet know when to expect this world wonder on 57th Street, but we’re bending over backwards to stay patient.

More info: Oiio Studio (h/t)

This is The Big Bend, a revolutionary curved skyscraper to be built on New York City’s 57th Street

The structure, designed by Oiio Studio, uses space effectively with its unique U-shape…

But doesn’t skimp on capacity, and is simply built long, rather than tall

The Big Bend will, in fact, become the longest building in the world, surpassing even Dubai’s Burj Khalifa

It was designed to circumvent strict New York zoning laws, which limit the height of buildings in the city

The building will require an elevator system that curves and loops just like the tower

The construction date is unknown, but The Big Bend will take Manhattan’s skyline above the curve when it arrives

For greener skyscrapers check out the vertical gardens in China.

Andrius

In cahoots with the secret orde…
With nobody. In cahoots with nobody.

Continue reading Amazing U-Shaped Skyscraper In New York Is Unveiled

These 3D-Printed Honeycomb Pods Are The Future Of Homeless Housing In New York

Homelessness is a global issue that is especially noticeable in big metropolises like New York. The statistics show that the number of homeless people in the Big Apple has been steadily growing since 1955 and by now there are about 61, 000 people sleeping in the city’s homeless shelters and thousands more living on the streets. Although there is no quick solution to the problem, creative agency Framlab recently came forward with a project called “Homed” that might help dealing with the issue.

The company suggests utilizing the otherwise blank side walls of tall buildings as a new spot for homeless housing. The honeycomb-shaped pods would connect to scaffolding structures next to the buildings and provide a versatile space for people to live in. Constructed from steel and oxidized aluminum the housing modules could be assembled and, if needed, disassembled in a matter of days and serve all-year-round. The interior made from wood-clad 3D-printed plastic would allow for the equipment, furniture, and cabinets to be integrated into the design with no need for extra accessories. The smart glass on the face of the pod would allow for art pieces or commercials to be screened on the module clusters.

However, while the ambitious project sounds and looks pretty impressive, the creators state that installing these honeycomb pods will not solve the existing issue completely. “The massive extent and complexity of the situation requires work on a broad regulatory and policy-making level. But, it is critical that the design community is part of the process.”

To find out more about the cause and the ways you can help, make sure to check out this link.

Source: framlab | behance (h/t)

Creative agency Framlab recently suggested a new project called “Homed” for housing the homeless in New York

These honeycomb-shaped pods that would connect to scaffolding structures on the blank side walls of buildings and become a temporary home for the less fortunate

The structures would be made in a way that will allow them to be erected and disassembled in a matter of days

The equipment, furniture, and cabinets would be integrated into the structure so that no additional accessories would be necessary

The pod will have a lockable entrance to ensure security, outlets, and the necessary storage space

The exterior of the unit would be constructed using steel and oxidized aluminum while the interior would be designed from 3D-printed plastic clad with wood laminate

The smart glass on the face of the pod would allow for art pieces or commercials to be screened on the module clusters

The creators agree that while the project offers a quick solution, the homelessness problem requires way more attention from the society and other institutions

Continue reading These 3D-Printed Honeycomb Pods Are The Future Of Homeless Housing In New York

Pelle Transforms New York Showroom into “Unnatural Habitat”

Pelle’s “Unnatural Habitat” setting is on display through June 28. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

New York-native brand Pelletransformed its Flatiron showroom-atelier into a dream-like setting with cream carpet and subtly shifting shades of pale yellow curtains offsetting its new works. Design duo Jean and Oliver Pelle (at left) call the installation Unnatural Habitat.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

The scene-stealing Nana Lure, a continuation of the Lure lighting collection initially launched in 2016, dominates the space with its large-scale banana frond shade cast in cotton and painted in sumptuous purples and greens. Two fixtures with patinated stepped spines suspend from boat hardware and leather straps made in collaboration with friend and leather designer Jason Ross of Artemas Quibble. The effect is pure tropical fantasy.

> See the NYCxDESIGN 2019 Event Calendar

Nana Lure and Fin Chair by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

Also not to be missed: Dust, a suspended arrangement of reflective shards producing a hazy ambient light and evoking a post-apocalypse world where shiny fragments become treasures. Is this the next wave? Final touches include Pelle’s solid aluminum DVN table with its precise zero-tolerance leg joints plus elevated timber and brass stool/tables from the Stiletto series that Jean describes as “the best way to present wood” with mesmerizing grain patterns on full display. The set-up is on view from May 15 to June 28 at 56 West 22nd St.

Dust, a suspended arrangement of glass shards, by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.
DVN table by Pelle. Photography courtesy of Pelle.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN 2019

Continue reading Pelle Transforms New York Showroom into “Unnatural Habitat”

The 15 Most Expensive Zip Code In The United States

50071-1518474572

11962: Bridgehampton, New York

This nine-bedroom home, which sits on 20 acres and is reportedly owned by Christie Brinkley, is being offered for $29.5 million. (The market for luxury Hamptons real estate is so strong that last week Zillow Group launched Out East, a website devoted to the region with listings and town guides.)

gettyimages-53228937-1518472417

94027: Atherton, California

The suburb is the most expensive place to live in Silicon Valley. Here’s what $17.5 million will get you there (spoiler alert: five bedrooms).

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90210: Beverly Hills, California

This $70-million estate includes a 20,000-square-foot main house, a 7,000-square-foot guest house, stables, riding rings, and a tennis court.

gettyimages-600175874-1518472573

33109: Fisher Island, Florida

Located three miles offshore from Miami, Fisher Island was once the private home of William K. Vanderbilt. In the 2000 census, it had the highest per-capita income in the United States.

gettyimages-820179248-1518472705

94301: Palo Alto, California

An empty lot on less than 3/10 of an acre? That’ll be $5.4 million.

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11976: Water Mill, New York

A 42-acre estate originally built for the Ford family could be yours for $175 million.

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94022: Palo Alto, California

94022 includes parts of Palo Alto and Los Altos including Westwind Community Barn, shown here.

94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

92067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

gettyimages-129351912-1-1518472914

 
94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

gettyimages-642614272-1518473171

90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

gettyimages-521445602-1518473259

94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

gettyimages-854800642-1518473372

10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

gettyimages-108116161-1518473473

90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

gettyimages-521170522-1518473530

93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

gettyimages-567374079-1518473655

2067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

gettyimages-583645500-1518473802

11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

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HOUSE TOUR: Bunny Williams Transforms A Homely A-Frame Into An Inspiring Studio Space

With 22 bucolic acres, Bunny Williams was only missing one thing at her legendary Connecticut retreat: an inspiring work studio where she could be her fiercely creative self. No longer.

 

Continue reading HOUSE TOUR: Bunny Williams Transforms A Homely A-Frame Into An Inspiring Studio Space

A Former Chicago Project Will Become A Museum Dedicated To Public Housing

When Chicago launched a massive plan in 2000 to overhaul all public housing in the city–knocking down high-rises like Cabrini-Green and slowly rebuilding new communities–residents resisted. They didn’t want to lose their homes, or the tight-knit communities that had formed over decades. But as the plan moved forward, they rallied around a new goal: to save one building to tell their stories and preserve local history.

The National Public Housing Museum will open in 2019 in Little Italy on the city’s Near West Side, in a building that was part of a New Deal development built in the 1930s as the first federal housing project in Chicago.

[Image: National Public Housing Museum /Holabird Jane Addams Homes]

“This is the dream of public housing residents to preserve their stories and to preserve the space,” says Robert Smith, associate director of the museum organization. “The demolition of spaces, of homes, of communities, instigated the activism around saving a particular space for the stories.”

The museum has been in planning since 2007 and was inspired, in part, by the Tenement Museum in New York, which recreates public housing experiences from an earlier time, and offered mentorship to the NPHM team. Inside the building in Chicago, visitors will see inside three apartments restored based on oral histories from three families who lived there at different points in time. The Medor family, who moved into the building when it was new, were a Russian-Jewish family who lost family members in Europe and came to Chicago to start over. Another apartment will memorialize the experience of the Rizzi family, Italian-Americans headed by a single mother who relied on the public housing of the time as a safe place for her children. A third apartment tells the story of the Hatch family, African-Americans who moved into the development in the 1960s.

[Image: National Public Housing Museum/The Hatch Family]

In galleries in other parts of the building, the museum will explore current debates around affordable housing and issues including gentrification, violence in cities, and the persistence of racial segregation. “I think a lot of museums are agnostic on politics, or apolitical,” says Smith. “There’s an idea that museums can’t advocate in the policy realm, and we just don’t think that’s true.” The new museum aims to bring together artists and scholars with the people most affected by housing policy, and host discussions that can help shape the future of that policy.

Until the museum opens in its new space–a long process that involved zoning changes and dealing with local politics, and also will involve restoring a space that has been abandoned for years and decomposing in harsh Chicago weather–the organization has been hosting a series of events elsewhere.

[Image: Landon Bone Baker Architects]

“It’s a museum in the streets,” Smith says. “It’s a museum that has found space in the cracks and crevices of the city to tell stories.” A current exhibition, Housing as a Human Right: Social Construction, focuses on the Jane Addams Homes, the development that included the building where the new museum will be launched. It brings visitors back to the years after the Great Depression, when public housing–along with social security, libraries and bridges, and funding for the arts–became a priority for the federal government.

“That sort of sense of the public good from the highest level is something that I think we’ve lost,” says Smith, pointing to Roosevelt’s proposed second bill of rights, which included the right of every family to a decent home. “He understands that you can’t guarantee the first bill of rights, our political rights, without guaranteeing economic rights.”

Smith hopes that the museum will help visitors rethink public housing–both its original promise, and how it is defined. 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is also public housing; so, in a sense, is every house owned by people who claim a tax break on their mortgage interest. The mortgage interest deduction cost the U.S. $77 billion in 2016; far more than went to “public housing,” Section 8 vouchers, or other programs for low-income Americans.

The organization also plans to work with local entrepreneurs in a small business incubator designed for public housing residents. A curriculum will teach about the history of entrepreneurship in the community–including successful co-ops, like a general store in the 1940s that redistributed union-level wages to resident members.

The museum store will itself be a cooperative owned and operated by public housing residents, serving as a living model for visitors to experience.

“We think that public housing residents, and poor and working-class people who have been on the margins, who tried to make ends meet in the informal economy actually have a lot to teach the rest of us about ways to think the economy anew,” Smith says. “We want to help facilitate those conversations and disseminate the knowledge that public housing residents have always wielded to a broader audience.”

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THE WILLIAMSBURG HOTEL, NEW YORK

The Williamsburg Hotel

Located at the prime corner of Wythe Avenue and North 10th Street, Brooklyn, New York, the hotel has been designed as an after-dark hub with a restaurant, rooftop pool, the neighbourhood’s first grand ballroom, and three distinct bars, including one in a replica water tower built to pay homage to the block’s historic, now defunct, wooden water tower factory.

The hotel will open in phases: its richly tiled-and-textured guestrooms and cosy lobby bar opened in January 2017, and a restaurant will launch this winter, followed by a rooftop pool, water tower bar, and Brooklyn’s first grand ballroom.

Continue reading THE WILLIAMSBURG HOTEL, NEW YORK

These Designs Have Made the World a Much Better Place

Helping others through the healing creativity of art is priceless. Whether it’s creating a sense of community among those displaced by war or spreading awareness about an imminent issue in the form of a mural, design in 2017 cultivated humanity in a year of ups and downs. Below are eight standout architectural and design contributions that will continue to change the world far beyond this year.

Photo: Courtesy of HQ Architects

Harugei Malchut, Tel Aviv, Israel

Designed by HQ Architects, led by architect Erez Ella, Harugei Malchut in Tel Aviv is the urban renewal project that is changing the face of Israel by conforming to the construction and preservation policy known as TAMA 38. Created by upgrading existing buildings to comply with new building policies around natural disasters and political conflicts, Harugei Malchut is putting forth a model that will help citizens to live in a modern and safe building affordably.

Photo: Courtesy of Groundswell

Summer Studio 2017, Brooklyn, New York

In a beautiful collaboration between Groundswell, a Brooklyn community arts nonprofit, and Gensler’s internship program, a stunning mural centered around immigration was installed at PS 373 this past summer called, “Flight of Freedom.”

Kachumbala Maternity Ward, Kachumbala, Uganda

As a country with limited access to healthcare, Uganda was the perfect place to construct a maternity ward for local residents in the city of Kachumbala. Taking into account the lack of access to electricity and clean water, HKS Architects made sure the structure would not be inhibited by these factors, building in a purifying system for rainwater and relying completely on solar power.

 
Photo: Courtesy of The Wing

The Wing SoHo, New York

Dubbed the “home base for women,” The Wing, a female-only members club, opened its second location in New York’s SoHo neighborhood this year. The open working spaces, stunning color-coded library, and witty tile work cultivate creative energy for women to come together and change the world.

Photo: Courtesy of CASS Community Social Service

Cass Community Tiny Homes, Detroit

These beautiful tiny homes not only work to fight homelessness in Detroit but also provide a unique rent-to-own opportunity, giving tenants a second chance to create a new life for themselves.

Photo: Courtesy of Gensler / © Tom Harris 2017

Thomas Hughes Children’s Library, Chicago

Featuring a brand-new redesign led by Gensler, the Thomas Hughes Children’s Library focuses on providing local Chicago children and families with state-of-the-art learning facilities, focusing on igniting the curiosity within children, inviting learning naturally.

 
Photo: Courtesy of Ealing Council

Marston Court, London

Constructed using old shipping containers, Marston Court in the London borough of Ealing is a 34-unit housing complex created for emergency housing and fighting the homeless epidemic, designed by both the Ealing Council and QED Property.

Photo: Credit Yannick Wegner, Mannheim

Refugee Camp Community Center, Mannheim, Germany

A group of architecture students from the University of Kaiserslautern built a stunning community center for a refugee camp in Mannheim. Over the course of three months, the students worked with refugees to design and build the lattice-front structure, creating a common space for residents to build a natural sense of community.

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