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Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

2020 2020 DESIGN, 2020 FUSION, UPCOMING WEBINARS DESIGN, UPCOMING WEBINARS FUSION, WEBINARS

 

Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

Eligible for NARI & NKBA CEU credits*

Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

You’ve been selling to baby boomers for generations. Perhaps all 74 million of them. But there’s a bigger powerhouse that deserves your attention – millennials. Millennials number over 83 million and have much different lifestyles and buying behaviors.

Join us for an educational webinar with Denise Butchko, industry professional & consultant. In this session we’ll compare both segments, covering hot buttons, warm leads and cold calling (which doesn’t exist in this segment).

Learning Objectives:

  • Targeting your marketing efforts & messaging to this generation
  • Focusing your online efforts to appeal to millennials 
  • Improving your showroom experience to attract this group 
  • Converting this powerful group into happy customers  

*This webinar is eligible for 1 NARI CEU credits and 0.1 NKBA CEU credits.

         

Request Recording


Meet the presenter:


Denise Butchko

Denise Butchko, Design & Marketing Expert

Denise Butchko is a festive, design- focused industry pro who’s been teaching and consulting since 2008.

As an experienced design and marketing expert, she brings enthusiasm and experience to her info-packed sessions that send you into action and accomplishment.

Hailing from the architectural mecca Windy City of Chicago, she works with clients in the design/build industries to create, organize, execute and evaluate their marketing efforts. She’s on the board of directors for the Association of Closet and Storage professionals and holds a Master level closet design certification. She’s also a part of the NKBA’s chapter education program.

She teaches a variety of online course including “How to Use Email Marketing To Grow Your Business” and “Closet Design 101”.

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I’m Over Open-Concept Design

CreditTrisha Krauss
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At some point, the previous owners of my house decided to take down the wall separating the living room from the dining room, creating an open space that, in theory, was a good idea. But in reality, it seemed to me, it didn’t make any sense.

The dining room felt like an awkward, disjointed extension of the living room, not quite private enough to be its own space, but not fully integrated, either. And with the living room missing a key wall, figuring out how to logically furnish it was no easy feat.

And so, about a month ago, I hired a carpenter to restore part of the wall. By partially closing off the space, I aimed to create a separate dining area with its own mood, and to restore the original dimensions of the living room.

When I told the carpenter what I wanted, he stared at me blankly, like he’d heard me wrong. “But people like the walls open,” he said.

In the weeks before the work was done, I avoided telling friends, worried that they, too, might think I was nuts. The few I did tell mostly seemed confused. In the age of open-concept design, who builds a wall?

The trend toward an open-concept floor plan — where few, if any, walls separate the spaces where we eat from those where we lounge — has become so commonplace it’s hard to imagine an alternative.

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The idea of togetherness drives the design, creating a setup where a parent can simultaneously make an omelet and watch the children play in the living room because, apparently, no one wants to be alone. Or guests can move freely from the giant kitchen island to the living room sofa, unencumbered by obstacles like doorways. The design style has become the liturgy of home-improvement shows, with HGTV stars like Joanna Gaines catapulting to fame largely because of her uncanny ability to transform rundown farmhouses into loft-like showrooms.

In the city, that ethos translates easily because space is tight and lofts are a genuine home style. Remove the walls in a galley kitchen and suddenly a tiny cooking space can feel larger and lighter. With an island instead of a wall, you might actually have a place to sit. New developments are invariably designed with open floor plans, a trend that’s reinforced by ever-shrinking apartments. Without any walls, a prospective tenant might not realize how small the space really is.

Developers claim the tenants like it. “Many new renters and buyers are embracing the open concept,” said Chris Schmidt, a senior vice president for Related Companies who oversees the developer’s rental portfolio. “It allows, certainly, the flexibility for entertaining and cooking.”

Mr. Schmidt pointed to millennials in particular as a “generation who crave that social interaction,” and so “are going to crave that open concept versus walling everything off.”

Owners of older apartments also see the potential in a sledgehammer, with an enthusiasm fueled not only by HGTV, but by home-improvement design websites like Houzz, which features endless images of Instagram-ready open living spaces.

“People walk into every space, regardless of the condition, and want to make an adjustment,” said Sydney Blumstein, an associate broker with Corcoran. People “feel like they must personalize a space to make it theirs, and that goes beyond home décor.”

And what better way to personalize than to make yours look like everyone else’s?

The fixation with openness extends to the suburbs, where buyers eagerly take down walls in the kitchen and living room, and widen doorways. “People are definitely looking at the floor plans,” said Judith Daniels, a sales associate with Prominent Properties Sotheby’s International Realty, who works frequently with first-time buyers moving from the city to Summit, Short Hills, Maplewood and South Orange — New Jersey towns with large, colonial homes that weren’t originally designed to look like lofts. “They’re looking for openness that’s already there or the ability to do it, just by opening the wall.”

But do we really need so much togetherness? That fabulous dinner party where guests wander endlessly from the kitchen to the living room feels far less glamorous with everyone staring at a sink full of dirty pots, or smelling the burned soufflé in the oven. Sure, the idea of watching your children play while you make dinner sounds great, but only until you’re trying to listen to Terry Gross on NPR while an episode of “Peppa Pig” blasts from the other side of what used to be a wall.

Then, of course, there are all those Houzz pictures. None of them show what it’s like when you haven’t tidied up in a week and you’re left staring at the living room clutter while you eat breakfast. With no walls, there’s nowhere to hide.

“It went so far about opening everything up,” said Jade Joyner, the chief creative officer of Metal + Petal, an interior design firm in Athens, Ga. “There’s something nice about privacy and having your own space.” In the last year, she’s noticed the beginnings of a pushback against the doctrine of openness. Clients have been asking for media rooms, libraries and playrooms set off from the main living area. A quiet den means you can come home from work and not immediately join the family, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. “It’s been indoctrinated that walls are bad, but they’re not,” Ms. Joyner said.

A home designed for entertaining does not necessarily take into account that most of the time you’re not entertaining. Mostly, you’re just living there, trying to read a book while your son practices the piano.

It also can be difficult to decorate an endless expanse of space. “My biggest issue with an open floor plan is lack of wall space. Where do you hang things?” said Abbe Fenimore, a Dallas-based interior designer who otherwise embraces open concept.

After the carpenter rebuilt my wall, I painted the dining room a deep teal, and the living room white. The two spaces, which once felt like they competed with each other for attention, now seem more defined. If the children’s homework is spread out on the dining table, I don’t have to look at it from the sofa anymore and wonder when it will get finished.

As for my friends, when I had a few of them over for dinner to celebrate the redecorated space, no one even noticed the wall. It was like it had always been there.

For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Correction: 

An earlier version of this article misstated the name of an interior design firm in Athens, Ga. It is Metal + Petal, not Petal and Metal.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page RE4 of the New York edition with the headline: I’m So Over Open-Concept Design. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
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Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

2020 2020 DESIGN, 2020 FUSION, UPCOMING WEBINARS DESIGN, UPCOMING WEBINARS FUSION, WEBINARS

 

Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

Eligible for NARI & NKBA CEU credits*

Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

You’ve been selling to baby boomers for generations. Perhaps all 74 million of them. But there’s a bigger powerhouse that deserves your attention – millennials. Millennials number over 83 million and have much different lifestyles and buying behaviors.

Join us for an educational webinar with Denise Butchko, industry professional & consultant. In this session we’ll compare both segments, covering hot buttons, warm leads and cold calling (which doesn’t exist in this segment).

Learning Objectives:

  • Targeting your marketing efforts & messaging to this generation
  • Focusing your online efforts to appeal to millennials 
  • Improving your showroom experience to attract this group 
  • Converting this powerful group into happy customers  

*This webinar is eligible for 1 NARI CEU credits and 0.1 NKBA CEU credits.

         

Request Recording


Meet the presenter:


Denise Butchko

Denise Butchko, Design & Marketing Expert

Denise Butchko is a festive, design- focused industry pro who’s been teaching and consulting since 2008.

As an experienced design and marketing expert, she brings enthusiasm and experience to her info-packed sessions that send you into action and accomplishment.

Hailing from the architectural mecca Windy City of Chicago, she works with clients in the design/build industries to create, organize, execute and evaluate their marketing efforts. She’s on the board of directors for the Association of Closet and Storage professionals and holds a Master level closet design certification. She’s also a part of the NKBA’s chapter education program.

She teaches a variety of online course including “How to Use Email Marketing To Grow Your Business” and “Closet Design 101”.

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Continue reading Millennials vs Boomers – Hot Buttons, Warm Leads and Cold Calls

Antiques for millennials: You want old stuff — you just don’t know it yet

In case your favorite millennial hasn’t told you yet, he’s ready to start fixing up his place. Generational trends show that people from the largest group ever to hit the American landscape, who are now roughly 36 or younger, have been converging on real estate for the past few years, so naturally it’s time for their thoughts to turn to decorating. Not just any decorating will do — it must be individual, focused on self, an aesthetic so personal it’s as though the home were furnished with their very own style DNA.

At least, that’s what the antique dealers are hoping

Individual style has been a mantra of designers for years and is considered a watchword of good taste in interiors circles. And one of the best ways to get it, to find the raw materials that can be shaped into that cool space that no one but you (and your interior design guru or that woman you obsess about on Pinterest) could ever have come up with is to buy antiques.

“It’s all about individuality and what best expresses your personality,” says New York designer Nick Olsen, a style savant who gets the Everyman sensibility. “You want something different that’s not in every store window. As much as I still love a cheap and cheerful style moment from CB2 or elsewhere — I’m sitting next to a drum table from CB2 in my own apartment right now — antiques, vintage pieces have a level of personality that should be speaking to the younger market right now.”

Olsen, who is co-design chair of the Chicago Antiques, Art and Design show at the Merchandise Mart on May 17-20 with California designer Ruthie Sommers (they’ll be hosting a “lively talk” May 18), notes that even as midcentury design stalwarts have remained popular, classic antiques have plummeted in price.

“The contemporary market is so hot in the collectible area, and even the prices of catalog-quality furniture are creeping up,” says Olsen. Which makes antiques, quite frankly, a steal. “Right now, antiques are a really good deal.”

Millennials, take note: For prices that are likely to be lower than the ones you’ll see in your favorite home catalog, you can get a quality piece of furniture that will get you instantly closer to the cool, original place you crave. Here’s what you need to know to get started.

You can’t beat the quality. “I hate that old ‘they don’t make ’em like they used to’ refrain,” says Olsen, “but it’s pretty true. Even as far back as the 1960s, it’s just a higher level of quality. And craftsmanship, structure, fabrication — a sofa that might be 40 years old might be better quality than what you’re buying at one of those mass-market retailers.”

Seriously, it’s not haunted. “You have to get over the stigma of ‘Oooh it was pre-owned,’” says Olsen. “I mean, don’t pick up something from the side of the road because of bed bugs. That’s the only thing that stresses me out, but otherwise, get over it.”

Don’t let the vocabulary throw you. One client told Olsen she didn’t want anything like a breakfront (a style of bookcase) in her home, then admitted that a breakfront “sounded like something her mother would have.” Listen, if you want to buy a sofa, no one’s going to try to sell you a davenport.

Focus on form. It’s the shape of vintage pieces that matters (upholstery can be changed) and the contrast between antiques and newer things. “I think there needs to be a re-appreciation of how cool antiques look next to contemporary pieces,” Olsen says. “How long have we been saying, ‘It’s all in the mix,’ but that somehow still needs to sink in. The market is now educated enough that people are not buying a suite of furniture, but they also might not get that something curvy and art nouveau might look really cool next to the Florence Knoll classic modernist sofa.”

Buy when your heart is in it. Though Olsen has a savvy eye for trends (art deco has already had its return to glory, art nouveau is coming back, American arts and crafts such as Stickley, not so much), he counsels clients to stick to pieces they fall in love with. “They should be things that speak to you. You’re not buying it because all of your friends have it or just because it’s old or because you need to have vintage to round out your living room. I want people to respond to the personality of something.”

If you don’t get the French armchair … we’re going to grab it. “I’m always looking for an interesting French or Italian armchair,” says Olsen. “One interesting chair, next to a modern sofa, can make a room.” And at these prices, “it brings out the hoarder part of me.”

cdampier@chicagotribune.com

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5 major ways millennials are changing office culture and design

 
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Millennials are changing office culture in visible ways — you can see it in the design sensibilities of modern workplaces and the thoughtfulness of office layouts. But they are also making figurative improvements which can be a little more difficult to see at first glance. Read on to learn how this younger generation stands to change the workplace, and even the economy, as we know it.

 

millennials changing office culture, millennials changing office design, the modern office, work-life balance, company culture, green office space

1. Flatter company hierarchy and open offices

In both a literal and a figurative sense, millennials want to flatten the average company model. The quintessential office — cubicles at the bottom and high-powered offices at the top — presents physical and psychological barriers to workplace harmony and productivity. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Millennials seem to understand this. Employees who had direct interaction with their managers within the last six months report being up to three times more engaged than workers who had no interaction with company leaders. This engagement gap is something millennial employees are trying to change for good. From open offices to more frequent opportunities for feedback and exchanging ideas, millennials crave flatness in company structure and communication channels.

Open-door policies don’t mean anything, after all, if your CEO’s office is inaccessible. Millennials also prefer to work in an environment with great natural lighting — probably because this, too, contributes to a sense of openness and harmony.

Three people are sitting at a table, hunkered over their laptops and laughing.

2. The vanishing office

The office is vanishing — not completely or overnight, but certainly with time. It’s all about allowing employees to do their work in familiar, comfortable or novel environments.

You have probably heard of communal work spaces, which offer an interesting middle-ground between a home office and a company campus. Home offices are booming, too, thanks to millennials. In one survey, 85 percent of millennial respondents indicated they would prefer telecommuting from home or elsewhere 100 percent of the time, versus commuting to a central location.

There are plenty of ways for employers to support this new way of working — even in the smaller details like outfitting home or satellite offices. Many companies provide their employees with allowances to buy furnishings, decorations or electronics for their spaces at work, and the same concept can apply for telecommuters. A stipend for remote workers can help them create a unique work environment at home, which contributes to their productivity and makes them feel more connected to the company’s home base.

millennials changing office culture, millennials changing office design, the modern office, work-life balance, company culture, green office space

3. The rise of the side-hustle

Depending on whom you ask, this is either a gift of market-driven society or a symptom of it. Either way — and whether out of necessity or the sheer pleasure of developing new skills — millennials are encouraging a new aspect of the economy.

The side-hustle isn’t the second job that parents and grandparents knew. It might not be incredibly lucrative, but the side-hustle does provide an opportunity to develop skills, pursue interests and gain a new stream of income in addition to a full time job. According to many economists, a side-hustle economy might soon become reality.

A robotic arm.

4. Building a brighter future with technology

Many jobs that require repetitive motion or manual labor may soon be performed by machines. What comes after that? According to some experts, one solution includes taxes on the robots, which would fund a citizen stipend known as “universal basic income.” Even now, polls are finding a majority of millennials to be in favor of UBI, since it could help many underemployed college graduates find some financial security as they monetize their skills.

We’re getting ahead of the point, but the fact remains: millennials have been extremely quick to read the writing on the wall when it comes to technology and the future of the world economy. They’re envisioning a future where everyone is free to pursue talents and passions, while also learning to integrate these passions with our work responsibilities.

A large office filled with greenery, including a live plant wall.

5. Companies that benefit the world

Millennials want to spend their time working for organizations that contribute to the common good in some way. They see the challenges facing the world, and recognize the importance of the triple bottom line: social, environmental and financial sustainability. They’ve also given more of their earnings to charity than their parents’ generation.

It doesn’t stop there. When it comes to the physical environment of the workplace, green design is very much in demand. The younger generation wants to work in spaces with eco-friendly lighting, solar power and even down-to-earth structural designs using recycled materials.

The point of all this is that young people seem to see a better way of doing things when it comes to working. Step one is to make work more comfortable and relevant for the people doing it. Step two is to make it relevant to the rest of the world.

Via NBC News, OnRec, Flex Jobs, Market Watch, SF Gate, The Street and Generosity

Images via Brooke Cagle, Marc Mueller, Bruce Mars, Johnson Wang, Scott Webb, RawPixel.com and Deposit Photos

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10 Social-Media Trends to Prepare for in 2018

In the past year, a number of significant stories involved social media: Facebook lured Snapchat users to Instagram, the president of the United States communicated official policy positions in 140 characters and Apple announced plans to alter the way we interact with our mobile devices.

Next year, social media is poised to create even more disruption as a number of new technological advancements go mainstream, and as social norms related to social media change. Here are the top 10 social media trends to prepare for as 2018 draws near.

1. Rise of augmented reality

At the first-ever event hosted in the Steve Jobs Theater, Apple announced the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X. Both devices incorporate a new chip that allows the phones to provide users with extraordinary augmented reality experiences. While augmented reality will have its initial impact on mobile gaming, it is likely that social media platforms will find ways to incorporate the new technology as well.

In the past year, a number of significant stories involved social media: Facebook lured Snapchat users to Instagram, the president of the United States communicated official policy positions in 140 characters and Apple announced plans to alter the way we interact with our mobile devices.

Next year, social media is poised to create even more disruption as a number of new technological advancements go mainstream, and as social norms related to social media change. Here are the top 10 social media trends to prepare for as 2018 draws near.

1. Rise of augmented reality

At the first-ever event hosted in the Steve Jobs Theater, Apple announced the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X. Both devices incorporate a new chip that allows the phones to provide users with extraordinary augmented reality experiences. While augmented reality will have its initial impact on mobile gaming, it is likely that social media platforms will find ways to incorporate the new technology as well.

2. Increasing popularity of Instagram Stories

Over 200 million people use Instagram Stories each month, which is over 50 million more than those who use Snapchat — and Instagram Stories is just one year old! At this rate, nearly half of all Instagram users will be using Stories by the end of 2018. This means that brands interested in connecting with Instagram users must take the time to master Instagram Stories.

 

Related: The Low-Down On Using Instagram Stories For Your Business

3. Continued investment in influencer marketing

Over 90 percent of marketers who employ an influencer marketing strategy believe it is successful. Companies like North Face, Hubspot and Rolex use social media–based influencer marketing strategies to connect with new audiences and improve engagement with existing audiences.

This year we saw that brands that opted for traditional advertising strategies struggled to connect to social media users. Next year, it is likely that more brands will embrace influencer marketing as a way to connect with audiences who tend to ignore traditional strategies.

Related: Why Brands Big and Small Continue to Fail at Influencer Marketing

4. Focus on Generation Z

A recent study conducted by Goldman Sachs concluded that Generation Z was more valuable to most organizations than millennials. Today, the oldest Gen Zers are 22 years old. They are just beginning to enter the labor force, and will have increased buying power for some time.

Brands will begin to recognize this, and will shift their social media strategies accordingly. Expect great investment in platforms loved by Gen Zers like Snapchat and Instagram.

Related: 4 Marketing Tactics for Appealing to Generation Z

5. Increasing brand participation in messaging platforms

Over 2.5 billion people use messaging platforms globally, and yet brands are still primarily focused on connecting with consumers on pure social networks. In 2018, expect brands to invest more time and money in connecting with consumers on messaging platforms. Artificial intelligence, voice assistants and chatbots will enable brands to offer personalized shopping experiences on messaging platforms like Messenger, WhatsApp and Kik.

Related: The Future Of Native Advertising for Brands and Publishers

6. Expansion of live streaming

What was once a novel gimmick has become a mainstream part of social media. Today, brands big and small have started using live streaming to capture the attention of followers.

GORUCK, a backpack manufacturer and the organizer of extreme endurance events, is one example of a medium-sized brand that has grown its reach by live streaming compelling content on Facebook. Thousands of followers tuned in to watch 48-hour coverage of a recent endurance race.

In 2018, more brands will begin to realize the power of live streaming, and will incorporate it into their monthly content plans.

Related: 12 Live Streaming Video Tips to Build Your Brand and Business

7. Rethinking Twitter

Twitter has failed to grow followers significantly in 2017. In fact, LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram all have more social media followers. This year, Twitter also lost access to streaming NFL games (Amazon won the rights). In 2018, it is likely that Twitter leadership will aim to rethink how the platform operates.

THE KITCHENS OF THE FUTURE AREN’T JUST ABOUT TECH

U.S. kitchen design has changed drastically in recent years, says designer Michael Schluetter, toward simple and clean materials and away from decorative elements.

“A decade ago, high gloss lacquers and exotic veneers such as makassar or Indian apple were all the rage,” he says. “The design language in the last two years has changed to using matte surfaces such as ultra-matte laminates and matte lacquers as well as rough finished wood veneers and solid woods such as wild oak, walnut, refurbished driftwoods or core ash.”

Continue reading THE KITCHENS OF THE FUTURE AREN’T JUST ABOUT TECH

Millennials Want to Own Homes Too, If U.S. Economy Would Consent

Kelsey Marshall and her boyfriend Chris Eidam, both 27 years old, call the home-buying process “terrifying.” But they’re clear about one thing: It beats the heck out of renting.

 

“We’re wasting money where we are right now,” near Bridgeport, Connecticut, Eidam said. “We just take our rent and we throw it away. That money doesn’t go to anything.”

Continue reading Millennials Want to Own Homes Too, If U.S. Economy Would Consent

TINY SOLUTION: DESIGNING MICRODWELLINGS FOR MILLENNIALS

Jessica Ocasio understands the frustrations of affordable housing options for young adults. A native of Puerto Rico, she saw the scarcity of student housing as an undergraduate student.

Now, Ocasio is equipping herself with a Master of Fine Arts in Interior Architecture in hopes of easing the housing burden for young adults. Her research explores how microdwellings may offer a creative solution.

Continue reading TINY SOLUTION: DESIGNING MICRODWELLINGS FOR MILLENNIALS

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