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Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign 2019

With WantedDesign 2019about to get underway in two distinct venues—Wanted Brooklyn at Industry City (May 16-20) and Wanted Manhattan at Terminal Stores (May 18-21)—we asked co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat about the fair’s theme, its new student design awards, and the second year of its bespoke Look Book at the Manhattan edition. The duo, both born in France, worked in the design and art fields before founding WantedDesign in 2011 to coincide with ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York. The event is now an integral part of the annual NYCxDESIGN calendar.

Interior Design: How would you describe the 2019 theme of “Conscious Design” in the context of the Manhattan and Brooklyn editions of WantedDesign?

Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat: In 2018, “Conscious Design” was defined as a leading theme to present sustainable projects that foresee what the future can be, if supported by creative vision and smart decisions. In 2019, the notion of conscious design will be encouraged and more widely highlighted in the WantedDesign programming as it is an urgent and essential matter. Protecting the environment, achieving reasonable consumption, and reducing waste are all issues that designers face on their daily tasks to create our homes and our work spaces, in addition to bringing beauty to healthier living.

Facing climate change, evaluating the impact we have on our planet and on civilization itself, falls now more than ever under the scope of responsibilities of all designers and creatives at large. As event organizers, we have the opportunity to have a voice; these are issues that we want to address specifically and that we implement in the way we build the show itself in encouraging our exhibitors to embrace a zero-waste approach when producing their installation. Last year we were able to reduce our waste by 50 percent, and in 2019 our policy is the first item in the contract we send to our exhibitors. 

The 2019 edition will challenge design professionals with original exhibits and showcases in order to forge their inspiration when drawing our future. Both destinations, Manhattan and Brooklyn, will include numerous educational (and fun) activities such as workshops, demos, and talks for the visitors and participants to connect, share, learn, and discover what should come next.

WantedDesign Brooklyn will take place at Industry City. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

ID: What can student designers attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: WantedDesign Brooklyn will have the Factory Floor dedicated to the Schools exhibit, with 30 schools coming from all over the world (France, China, Mexico, El Salvador, England, the United States, etc.). Now this show is becoming a not-to-be-missed destination to discover young talent. For the students, it’s a stepping stone to build up their professional network, which we know is essential.

Students will benefit directly from our ever-growing number of visitors, including design professionals and manufacturers. This year, for the first time, we have organized a jury to award the best design-student projects. It’s a way to highlight and support them even more. The jury will be led by Avinash Rajagopal, editor in chief of Metropolis, and includes Ayse Birsel, co-founder of Birsel + Seck; Andrea Lipps, assistant curator of contemporary design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; and Jonsara Ruth, co-founder and design director of Healthy Materials Lab at Parsons School of Design.

Five Awards will be given to the following: Best Original Concept and Design, Best Sustainable Solution, Best Project with Social Impact, Best Ready-to-be-Implemented-or-Produced (Project or Product), and Best Conscious Design Project (that unites three of the four previous criteria). Those five students will benefit from special promotion, and this review is a chance to show their project to professionals who can help with constructive criticism and a real eye for design.

We are also hosting various activities and programming that will be learning experiences for the students. For schools, we are really building opportunities of exchange and partnerships, which is essential.

Lastly, we are partnering again with AIGANY to host the 3rd Spring Wanted Job Fair. It’s a “speed dating” format, not portfolio review, offering a chance for young designers to meet with creative firms.

WantedDesign Manhattan will take place at Terminal Stores. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

 

ID: What can members of the trade attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: In Manhattan, we always have a great presence of group exhibits from all over the world. This is really a unique feature of our show. This is how we share original design, new ideas, new material, new potential collaborations. Visitors will meet with Polish, Egyptian—for the first time in the U.S., and it’s a large group of 13 designers—Canadian, Mexican, and Colombian designers.

It’s also the second year of Look Book, a program dedicated to the promotion of the best high-end designers and makers in North America. This section of the show targets interior designers and architects who are looking for talented designers/makers with unique know-how to create bespoke pieces.

In the Launch Pad program, visitors will discover a large selection of 33 international designers, in two categories, furniture and lighting, who have a product ready to be launched in the U.S. market and are looking for the right partner to do it.

Wanted Interiors will explore the Future of Water/Bathroom 2025, a research project resulting from a collaboration between a team from Pratt Accelerator and the American Standard creative team, which is sponsoring this program. It involves how to change behaviors when using water, new scenarios and new ways to build bathroom for a sustainable urban living.

Last but not least, our talk series presented by DesignMilk and Clever is also a great focus for people who want to use WantedDesign as a resource and networking platform.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN

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Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

The 2019 edition of ICFF is just around the corner. From Sunday, May 19 to Tuesday, May 21, ICFF will be open exclusively to trade professionals. New York City’s Javits Convention Center will host products by more than 900 exhibitors from over 60 countries in the high-end interiors space. With so much to see, Interior Design has selected a few standouts to preview ahead of the show. See 10 of them below.

Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini

AK/25 fixture by Paik Sun Kim for Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini. Booth 2163. Photography courtesy of Boffi and Fantini.

 

Boffi and Fantini‘s AK/25 fixture stands out for both its origami-inspired design and its innovation in the water-flow process.

arianeSké

Joy bar chair by Janine Hulsker for arianeSké. Booth 1827. Photography courtesy of arianeské. 

 

Dutch seating designer and manufacturer arianeSké began with a straightforward mission: to bring comfort back to high-end seating. The polished wooden backing of the Joy bar chair gives it a distinguished look.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

Bernhardt

Astra lounge chair by Cory Grosser for Bernhardt. Booths 1339 and 1325. Photography courtesy of Bernhardt.

 

Leave it to Cory Grosser to blend the best of precision—through geometric details and ease—in a curved silhouette. Grosser’s design of the Astra lounge chair for Bernhardt is suited to a variety of aesthetically different spaces.

 Brendan Ravenhill

Beam pendant from Brendan Ravenhill. Booth 857. Photography courtesy of Brendan Ravenhill.

 

Brendan Ravenhill‘s Beam light fixture responds to the efficiency and casting power of LED lighting with style. Beam makes use of bounced and refracted light to create a soft glow, in a strong linear silhouette.

Ceramics of Italy 

The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy. Booths 2229-2325. Photography courtesy of Ceramics of Italy.

 

A distinguished collection of porcelain slabs, The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy exudes drama and luxury. The four available patterns are inspired by exquisite marbles from three continents, with suitable applications ranging from flooring to walls and custom countertops. 

Kohler 

Sensate Touchless Kitchen Faucet with Kohler Konnect. Booth 2239. Photography courtesy of Kohler. 

 

A sleek, no-contact faucet is the stuff of culinary enthusiasts’ dreams. Kohler Konnect immerses users in experiential luxury, with the best of good design and intelligent technology.

Ocrúm

Orizon mirror by Ocrúm. Booth 1062. Photography courtesy of Ocrúm.

 

The Orizon mirror, part of Brooklyn-based design studio Ocrúm‘s debut collection, toes the line between art and functional decor. The rippled surface is evocative of a serene sea, and blends into a smooth colored sky.

Ross Gardam

Nebulae chandelier by Ross Gardam. Booth 1763. Photography by Ross Gardam. Photography © Hadyn Cattach.

 

Ross Gardam brings a redesigned version of his Nebulae chandelier to his eponymous design studio’s ICFF booth. The horizontal configuration is a new aspect of the chandelier’s design, and the uniquely-layered glass shows a highly original exploration of light’s diffusion.

Studio Henk

Co lounge chairs; 2.5 seat sofa (left) and single seat armchair (right) by Studio Henk. Booth 1827. Photography by Studio Henk.

 

The finishes of every piece offered by Studio Henk are fully customizable. The functional aesthetic of the Co lounge chair epitomizes modernism and, every detail, from the Kvadrat upholstery to the stain of the wood accents, can be changed to fit the mood of the space it’ll go into.

SkLO

Balance pendant by SkLO. Booth 957. Photography courtesy of SkLO.

 

The Balance pendant is emblematic of SkLO‘s emphasis on beauty and originality. The pendant’s soft curve and inherent asymmetry creates visual interest.

Read more: 2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage 

Continue reading Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

ICFF 2019 Highlights

Watch highlights from ICFF 2019 at Javits Center in Manhattan. We captured the latest in lighting, bath fixtures, furniture, and more. Video by James Eades and Steven Wilsey.

> Check out our coverage of the 2019 NYCxDESIGN Awards and ICFF party

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN 2019

Continue reading ICFF 2019 Highlights

Four Hot New Rooftop Bars in NYC

Have a drink in style during NYCxDESIGN at one of these three amazing rooftop bars in Manhattan (and one overlooking JFK airport’s most iconic terminal)—all of which feature cool ambience and great views.

Take in the Glamour of Old Manhattan at Ophelia Lounge

> Yabu Pushelberg and Ian Schrager Bring Style to Times Square with The Terrace

> Lounge Poolside at the Just-Opened TWA Hotel’s Observation Deck

> Enjoy a 360-Degree View of NYC from Fleur Room at the Moxy Chelsea

Continue reading Four Hot New Rooftop Bars in NYC

Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska. Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

 

An exhibition and pop-up at WantedDesign in Manhattan is spotlighting emerging Polish design, from ceramics to jewelry and even toys. Titled #PLDSGN: Up-And-Coming Designers from Poland, the exhibit is presented by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, an organization dedicated to showcasing Polish arts and culture on the international level. Throughout the exhibit, one trend is clear: a growing preference for sustainable manufacturing and the reduction of environmental impact.

Goods will be for sale at WantedDesign at the Terminal Stores in Manhattan through May 21, and at WantedDesign’s IC Store in Brooklyn from May 23 through June 13. The presentation coincides with the Institute’s launch of its Guide to Polish Design, a comprehensive online document surveying a century of Polish design. Here are five highlights from the exhibition.

Read more: Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska

Illustrator and designer Magda Pilaczynska adorns each of her porcelain dishes with spirited graphics and gilded detailing. Look at Me Plates measure 25 inches across and are equipped with a hanger, so they’re suited to walls as well as tables. Plus, each piece is unique—Pilaczynska crafts and fires each one by hand.

Photography courtesy of UAU Project.

Bubble 06 lamp by UAU Project

To sustain its goal of zero waste and zero emission, UAU Project generally makes its products to order—like this Space Age-inspired lamp, Bubble 06, which the company designed and 3D printed in recyclable bioplastic at its Warsaw studio.

Photography courtesy of ATOMY.

Bangle Bag No. 2 by ATOMY

ATOMY’s line of exclusively hand-sewn bags use only regional materials and plants, and none of it goes to waste. Take, for example, its Bangle Bag No. 2, which is handcrafted of fully organic, vegetable-tanned cowhide leather. It sports a robust wax coating for water resistance, along with a pair of circular 3D-printed handles that lend the tote its name.

Photography courtesy of bro.Kat.

Carbon jewelry by bro.Kat

Strongly influenced by its roots in Europe’s Silesia region, design collective bro.Kat forays into fashion with a new collection of carbon jewelry referencing the region’s days as a wealthy exporter of coal. It’s a project befitting the company’s name, which is both a nod to its home city of Katowice and a play on words, translating, roughly, to “black gold.”

Photography courtesy of Fenek.

Espresso cups by Fenek

At only four centimeters tall, these artisanal cups by Fenek are perfectly scaled for espresso. Handcrafted in porcelain, each features a small face—one of the Warsaw-based studio’s several hallmarks—along with quirky glazes in a range of abstract patterns. 

Read more: Q&A With WantedDesign Co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat

Continue reading Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

A Connecticut Retreat Designed to Attract Houseguests

Finding a home in the country was the easy part. Creating a place their Manhattan friends would want to visit was the challenge.

A Country House for Their City Friends

9 Photos

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Image
Alexandra Rowley

When Manhattanites Matt Rappoport and Beno Varela began looking for a new home in Connecticut, they had mixed feelings about making the move.

Mr. Rappoport, an attorney, was ready to leave his job at a large law firm, and Dr. Varela, a gastroenterologist, had found a practice he planned to join in Hamden, Conn. But their friends and social lives were in New York, even though Mr. Rappoport had grown up in Fairfield, Conn.

“We were moving out of the city to a neighborhood where we had no social ties, other than Matt’s family,” said Dr. Varela, 35.

 

“There were nerves, as a gay couple, without kids, moving to the suburbs,” said Mr. Rappoport, 31, who is now the chief executive of a finance start-up.

Matt Rappoport and Beno Varela bought and renovated a 19th-century house in Fairfield, Conn., with help from J.P. Franzen Associates Architects and RC Studio.CreditAlexandra Rowley

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Matt Rappoport and Beno Varela bought and renovated a 19th-century house in Fairfield, Conn., with help from J.P. Franzen Associates Architects and RC Studio.CreditAlexandra Rowley

But they had an idea about how to calm those nerves: Find a charming house and transform it into a destination so compelling that it would lure their friends for regular visits.

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“It was really important to us to create a beautiful space,” Dr. Varela said. “I wanted to feel like we could host and welcome people from the city.”

When they began hunting for a house in late 2016, they realized there was another issue: Most homes on lots with the leafy, country feeling they wanted were far too large — between 4,000 and 6,000 square feet.

“Coming from a 1,200-square-foot apartment, which was really big for the city, to a house that was 4,000 square feet seemed crazy to us,” Mr. Rappoport said.

 

Finally, they found a 2,500-square-foot, three-bedroom home in Fairfield, dating to the 1830s. It was far from perfect: The main entrance opened directly into the kitchen; it didn’t have the home office Mr. Rappoport needed; and an oddly placed powder room made the ground floor seem dark and chopped up. But they bought it for $937,500 in March 2017 with the intention of making some changes.

The house had originally been built a short distance away, serving as a general store in the 19th century. It was moved to its present location and converted into a home in 1929. A renovation in 2011 produced the kitchen that Mr. Rappoport and Dr. Varela liked and planned to keep.

To overhaul the rest, they turned to Jack Franzen, of J.P. Franzen Associates Architects, and Rena Cherny, an interior designer who owns RC Studio, who developed plans to reconfigure the ground floor by demolishing the powder room — which sat at one end of the living room, blocking light from two windows — and create a single, bright living-and-dining area. Then they used the footprint of the old formal dining room to create a new powder room and home office.

A powder room was demolished to make room for a large, open living and dining area furnished with a Modern Lounge sectional sofa from Montauk Sofa, Fly SC1 chairs from &Tradition (from $3,029), a custom upholstered ottoman and a Lucia wool rug from Tibetano.CreditAlexandra Rowley

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A powder room was demolished to make room for a large, open living and dining area furnished with a Modern Lounge sectional sofa from Montauk Sofa, Fly SC1 chairs from &Tradition (from $3,029), a custom upholstered ottoman and a Lucia wool rug from Tibetano.CreditAlexandra Rowley

The objective was “to clean it up, but to keep the charm of it, while making better use of the spaces,” Mr. Franzen said.

“We wanted it to be cozy for entertaining, but definitely modern and fresh, while maintaining all the elements of an old home: the original windows, doors, hardware and shutters,” Ms. Cherny said. “The vibe of a country home, but with fresh furnishings.”

Achieving that took about a year and $250,000, as Ms. Cherny delicately negotiated the purchase of furniture and accessories that suited Mr. Rappoport’s preference for midcentury-modern design and Dr. Varela’s desire for softness and a touch of the traditional.

“Part of what we needed her for was to mediate between us,” Mr. Rappoport said. “To understand both of us, and find things that worked.”

Added Dr. Varela, “She was really our therapist for that entire year.”

Ms. Cherny furnished the living room with a carefully chosen mix of clean-lined, comfortable furniture, including a cushy Montauk sectional sofa, a corduroy wool Tibetano rug and a large custom-upholstered ottoman.

The dining area has harder, more angular elements, including steel-and-wood Standard chairs from Vitra, an Agnes chandelier from Roll & Hill and a slender concrete dining table from ABC Carpet & Home, as well as a moody Jenny Boot photograph that the couple bought at the New York Affordable Art Fair.

The lounge space outdoors has a Terassi sofa ($3,995) and chairs ($1,695) from Design Within Reach and Shoreline ceramic side tables from Serena & Lily ($258) arranged around a gas Kove fire table from Brown Jordan Fires ($2,636).CreditAlexandra Rowley

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The lounge space outdoors has a Terassi sofa ($3,995) and chairs ($1,695) from Design Within Reach and Shoreline ceramic side tables from Serena & Lily ($258) arranged around a gas Kove fire table from Brown Jordan Fires ($2,636).CreditAlexandra Rowley

Beyond a Dutch door, Ms. Cherny also designed a patio with a lounging area around a firepit, and a separate outdoor dining area with a long table that can seat eight, to take advantage of the bucolic, one-acre lot.

This spring, Mr. Rappoport and Dr. Varela are rerouting the driveway, to bring guests to the proper front door of the house rather than the kitchen door. But since finishing the majority of the renovation last summer, they have been pleased to discover that their house is already having the desired effect on friends.

“They enjoy it,” Dr. Varela said. “People actually do want to get out of the city more than I thought they would.”

For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page RE6 of the New York edition with the headline: This Retreat Is Designed to Attract Houseguests. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

 

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Continue reading A Connecticut Retreat Designed to Attract Houseguests

Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign 2019

With WantedDesign 2019about to get underway in two distinct venues—Wanted Brooklyn at Industry City (May 16-20) and Wanted Manhattan at Terminal Stores (May 18-21)—we asked co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat about the fair’s theme, its new student design awards, and the second year of its bespoke Look Book at the Manhattan edition. The duo, both born in France, worked in the design and art fields before founding WantedDesign in 2011 to coincide with ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York. The event is now an integral part of the annual NYCxDESIGN calendar.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

Interior Design: How would you describe the 2019 theme of “Conscious Design” in the context of the Manhattan and Brooklyn editions of WantedDesign?

Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat: In 2018, “Conscious Design” was defined as a leading theme to present sustainable projects that foresee what the future can be, if supported by creative vision and smart decisions. In 2019, the notion of conscious design will be encouraged and more widely highlighted in the WantedDesign programming as it is an urgent and essential matter. Protecting the environment, achieving reasonable consumption, and reducing waste are all issues that designers face on their daily tasks to create our homes and our work spaces, in addition to bringing beauty to healthier living.

Facing climate change, evaluating the impact we have on our planet and on civilization itself, falls now more than ever under the scope of responsibilities of all designers and creatives at large. As event organizers, we have the opportunity to have a voice; these are issues that we want to address specifically and that we implement in the way we build the show itself in encouraging our exhibitors to embrace a zero-waste approach when producing their installation. Last year we were able to reduce our waste by 50 percent, and in 2019 our policy is the first item in the contract we send to our exhibitors. 

The 2019 edition will challenge design professionals with original exhibits and showcases in order to forge their inspiration when drawing our future. Both destinations, Manhattan and Brooklyn, will include numerous educational (and fun) activities such as workshops, demos, and talks for the visitors and participants to connect, share, learn, and discover what should come next.

WantedDesign Brooklyn will take place at Industry City. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

ID: What can student designers attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: WantedDesign Brooklyn will have the Factory Floor dedicated to the Schools exhibit, with 30 schools coming from all over the world (France, China, Mexico, El Salvador, England, the United States, etc.). Now this show is becoming a not-to-be-missed destination to discover young talent. For the students, it’s a stepping stone to build up their professional network, which we know is essential.

Students will benefit directly from our ever-growing number of visitors, including design professionals and manufacturers. This year, for the first time, we have organized a jury to award the best design-student projects. It’s a way to highlight and support them even more. The jury will be led by Avinash Rajagopal, editor in chief of Metropolis, and includes Ayse Birsel, co-founder of Birsel + Seck; Andrea Lipps, assistant curator of contemporary design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; and Jonsara Ruth, co-founder and design director of Healthy Materials Lab at Parsons School of Design.

Five Awards will be given to the following: Best Original Concept and Design, Best Sustainable Solution, Best Project with Social Impact, Best Ready-to-be-Implemented-or-Produced (Project or Product), and Best Conscious Design Project (that unites three of the four previous criteria). Those five students will benefit from special promotion, and this review is a chance to show their project to professionals who can help with constructive criticism and a real eye for design.

We are also hosting various activities and programming that will be learning experiences for the students. For schools, we are really building opportunities of exchange and partnerships, which is essential.

Lastly, we are partnering again with AIGANY to host the 3rd Spring Wanted Job Fair. It’s a “speed dating” format, not portfolio review, offering a chance for young designers to meet with creative firms.

WantedDesign Manhattan will take place at Terminal Stores. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

ID: What can members of the trade attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: In Manhattan, we always have a great presence of group exhibits from all over the world. This is really a unique feature of our show. This is how we share original design, new ideas, new material, new potential collaborations. Visitors will meet with Polish, Egyptian—for the first time in the U.S., and it’s a large group of 13 designers—Canadian, Mexican, and Colombian designers.

It’s also the second year of Look Book, a program dedicated to the promotion of the best high-end designers and makers in North America. This section of the show targets interior designers and architects who are looking for talented designers/makers with unique know-how to create bespoke pieces.

In the Launch Pad program, visitors will discover a large selection of 33 international designers, in two categories, furniture and lighting, who have a product ready to be launched in the U.S. market and are looking for the right partner to do it.

Wanted Interiors will explore the Future of Water/Bathroom 2025, a research project resulting from a collaboration between a team from Pratt Accelerator and the American Standard creative team, which is sponsoring this program. It involves how to change behaviors when using water, new scenarios and new ways to build bathroom for a sustainable urban living.

Last but not least, our talk series presented by DesignMilk and Clever is also a great focus for people who want to use WantedDesign as a resource and networking platform.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN

Continue reading Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign 2019

Manhattan Gets Its First Gold-Brick Building

AD receives an exclusive first look at the future gilt-façade condominium on an iconic Downtown block

This spring, Manhattan will get the first hand-laid gilded bronze brick building at 196 Orchard Street on the Lower East Side.

The 94-unit condominium building is the result of a collaboration between Adam Rolston at INC (who developed the interior design) and Ben Shaoul, founder of Magnum Real Estate Group and co-developed by REEC. Both saw the potential for a more textured building in an area known for its edgier, artsier vibe.

 

 

A private terrace at 196 Orchard Street.

Photo: Courtesy of Williams New York

“We felt that a traditional glass structure didn’t mesh with the surroundings,” says Rolston, who looked for a material humble enough to belong in the neighborhood that had been home to waves of immigrants over decades, but luxurious enough to attract a contemporary resident.

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He found such a candidate in artisanal Spanish bricks infused with gold dust that will gradually oxidize and become darker over time. Produced by the 130-year-old manufacturer Cerámica La Covadonga, the bricks form the instantly recognizable lower exterior building façade and were flown in from the Spanish village of Cadaqués (also known for its anchovies, and a source of inspiration to the painter Salvador Dalí). They symbolize the eclectic and transformational nature of the neighborhood.

 

A close-up view of the gold-infused bricks.

Photo: Courtesy of Williams New York

The building shares a city block with the ever-popular Katz’s Deli, referenced in Seinfeld and The Jim Gaffigan Show episodes. “Katz’s was the birthplace of the classic corned beef sandwich, knishes, smoked fish, and Manischewitz matzos,” says Rolston, reflecting on the distinctly old-school New York nature of the block and surroundings. Over the years, the neighborhood became a mecca for alternative art dealers, indie fashion retailers, and renowned smaller restaurants.

The interiors of the apartments, which range from studios ($965,000) to four-bedrooms ($6,500,000), use warm materials with a rich, natural, refined, and rough look all at once, using concrete, bleached walnut, acid-etched Eramosa limestone, and Nero Marquina black marble with its classic white veining. Residents also can enjoy a two-story, 30,000 square-foot flagship Equinox Fitness Club & Spa and a furnished rooftop terrace with sundeck and outdoor kitchen. “We wanted the rooftop to have a community type of feeling that brings the entire residency together,” says Shaoul.

 

A rendering of the lobby at 196 Orchard Street.

The glowing exterior of the building, designed by Ismael Leyva Architects, has a rather “muscular character, reminiscent of the workshops and manufacturing structures that once dominated the area,” says Rolston.

Sixty-thousand bricks were used for the building, each infused with 24K-gold dust. A Midas touch if there ever was one.

Continue reading Manhattan Gets Its First Gold-Brick Building

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