Advertisements

Tag Archives: luxury

Photographer Fulfills His Childhood Dream And Builds A Luxury Tree House To Live In

It was the spring of 2014 when Foster Huntington decided to chase his childhood dream. Soon, he began building a fairytale-like treehouse that he has been fantasizing about for years but the project he planned to spend a few months on ended up taking most of the year.

To begin the build, Huntington gathered a small group of friends from all over the country (some of whom were professional carpenters) and started planning the treehouse in Skamania County, Washington, on a piece of land that has belonged to his family for over 20 years.

About 12 months later, The Cinder Cone was finished. The multi-level structure consists of two treehouses, connected by a 25-foot bridge, a wood-fired hot tub, and even a skate bowl.

“I have always loved treehouses, so I thought it was time to build a big-boy one,” Huntington told Outside Magazine. “I wanted to make a place where my friends would want to come hang.”

Eventually, The Cinder Cone became his permanent home. Huntington estimates that the entire project cost him about $170,000. “I could’ve bought a house,” he told The New York Times. “But this is so much better. For me, it’s realizing a childhood dream.”

More info: instagram

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Advertisements

Artist Creates 16 Types Of Designer Packaging For Food Products To Show The Absurdity Of Brands

We’re all familiar with brands like Prada, Apple and Chanel. To most people, those brands carry a sense of luxury, quality, and refinement. There are also those who believe that such companies stand for decadence, mindless spending, and overpriced items. Perhaps driven by these conflicting opinions Israeli artist Peddy Mergui created a series of works where he imagined how would certain food products look like if they were packaged by famous brands.

The project is called Wheat is Wheat is Wheat and explores the idea of how brand packaging changes our perception. After all, the food inside is still the same. “The exhibition explores the dynamic and often blurred ethical boundaries of design within consumer culture”. That’s how the artist himself describes the idea.

More info: peddymergui.com

Continue reading Artist Creates 16 Types Of Designer Packaging For Food Products To Show The Absurdity Of Brands

10 Modern-Rustic Weekend Houses in the Country

Hot summers in the city get old pretty fast, so having a weekend house in the country is a luxury. But that doesn’t mean that luxury can’t be rustic. Here are 10 residences that are stunning in their get-away-from-it-all simplicity.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20

1. Hilltop Aerie by Aidlin Darling Design Provides Respite in Northern California

Two San Francisco denizens working in finance and tech came to Aidlin Darling Design with a straightforward proposition. Create a simple, efficient house, restrained in cost and scale, for their empty hillside site in Glen Ellen, about an hour north of the city. The couple’s only imperative? A single-story plan. Since Barry Mehew and David Rice were familiar with tending to aging relatives, they knew to avoid the hazards staircases present (their main residence, a four-story Victorian in the city, has plenty). Although they envisioned this new house as a weekend getaway for now, they anticipate eventually spending most of their time there, and downsizing to a pied-à-terre back in the city. Read more about this project

2. Jan Henrik Jensen Designs Unconventional Round House in Denmark

In the Danish shelter magazine that Finn and Janni Holm subscribe to, architect Jan Henrik Jansenwas pictured sitting in front of a house that he had constructed with his own hands. “We just rang him and asked him to do one for us,” Janni Holm says. “That’s where our adventure started.” The Holms had decided to build a new home on a lot and a simple wooden farmhouse was what they had in mind. What they got was entirely different, thanks to Jansen’s standard procedure: always conceiving more than one solution for a project. He first showed the Holms a design that corresponded exactly to their farmhouse brief. Then he surprised them with plans for a radically different idea: a round house. Read more about this project

3. SPG Architects Transforms Lilian Swann Saarinen’s Former Cape Cod Residence

Modernist royalty, by marriage, Lilian Swann Saarinen had met her husband, Eero, when she was studying sculpture at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, headed by his father, Eliel. After the younger Saarinens’ divorce in 1953, she moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, with their two children and asked former Eero Saarinen and Associates architect Olav Hammarstrom to expand a fisherman’s cottage in the Cape Cod town of Wellfleet for use as a low-budget family getaway. “On the Cape, a lot of architects built on a dime and a prayer,” SPG Architects principal Eric Gartner explains. Considerably more painstaking was his own task: updating the Hammarstrom design for repeat clients, one in financial services and the other a sculptor. Read more about this project

4. The Success of Andreas Martin Löf’s House Near Stockholm Lies in Being Playful and Taking Risks

“Everybody was against it,” Andreas Martin-Löf says, looking at the offending infinity pool outside his weekend house in the Stockholm archipelago. “My friends thought it was nouveau riche. They wondered why I couldn’t just go down to the jetty for a swim, like everyone else.” Traditionally, Swedes favor rustic summer retreats, and Martin-Löf concedes that he usually dislikes “luxury” architecture both personally and in his work at Andreas Martin-Löf Architects. Yet he was intrigued by the possibility of the infinity pool as a mirror for the property’s pine trees and expansive water views. “The pool is a crucial part of the success of the house,” he continues. “You have to be a bit playful and take a few risks.” Read more about this project

Read more: 15 Incredible Pools from Around the World

5. Michigan Lake House by Desai Chia Architecture: 2016 Best of Year Winner for Country House

A real-estate entrepreneur clipped and saved a newspaper story about Arjun Desai and Katherine Chia’s glassy weekend pavilion that won a Best of Year Award in 2013. The entrepreneur was intrigued by the way the house practically floated above its spectacular surroundings, a bucolic estate in rural New York—because he had just bought 60 acres on a remote peninsula jutting into Lake Michigan. Arguably even more extraordinary than the New York site, this one sits between a cherry orchard and a bluff plunging 120 feet down to the water. Read more about this project

6. Minimalist Gem by Atelier Carvalho Arujo Masters a Tricky Site in Portugal 

Modernist-minded designers often mine bodies of water for inspiration. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater—perhaps the greatest house of the 20th century—wouldn’t exist without the stream that runs, dramatically, below it. Following in this storied tradition, Atelier Carvalho Araújo used water as both guide and counterpoint in designing a house in Vieira do Minho, Portugal. The site is a steep slope overlooking the Caniçada Valley, about 20 miles northeast of Braga. A stream meanders down the site, connecting ponds at the top and bottom of the hillside, both now corralled into freeform pools.“Architecture must have the gift of awakening sensations, emotions,” principal José Manuel Carvalho Araújo says. “The only thing I don’t want to evoke is indifference.” Read more about this project

7. Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks Conceive Stone-Clad House Near the Estate of Her Father, Charles

When it comes to delivering the unexpected, Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks, respectively 33 and 35 years old, have already developed a reputation. The pair transformed a tiny tile showroom in London with an installation of porcelain planks, playing cleverly with geometry in just four shades of gray to achieve a dazzling op art effect—a tour de force that landed right on the cover of Interior Design. Now, with a weekend house in Scotland, Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio have defied expectation in very different ways. Read more about this project

8. Nani Marquina’s Costa Brava Retreat Is a Collector’s Paradise

Nani Marquina has a thing for straw hand brooms. The textile designer and Nanimarquinafounder owns more than two-dozen such specimens, sourced from locales as far flung as Thailand, Pakistan, and Ibiza. Her collecting passion also extends to woven baskets, beaded necklaces, teapots, seeds, dried gourds, soap, succulents, and sand (stored in fish bowls), all of which garnish the Esclanyà, Spain, getaway she shares with her husband, photographer Albert Font. The 1970s dwelling has a whitewashed simplicity that renders it a perfect backdrop for the couple’s assorted ephemera. “The most important thing is not the container, but the contents,” Marquina says. Read more about his project

9. Architect Mathias Klotz Creates a Pair of Cottages on a Remote Island in Chile

For Chileans—especially those who live in the frenetic capital, Santiago—a second home is an essential refuge, an escape to the serene beauty of the natural landscape. Architect Mathias Klotz, principal of his eponymous firm, has designed many such houses, characteristically with a clean-lined modernism that nods to one of his heroes, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. For his own family’s retreat on a largely undeveloped coastal island, he used archetypal forms that evoke both past and present. Constrained by the remote location and tricky logistics, the result is a timeless design that blends into the pristine setting. Read more about this project

10. Mork Ulnes Architects and Office of Charles de Lisle Create a Minimalist Guesthouse in Sonoma

Casper Mork-Ulnes was born in Norway, moved to Italy at age 2, and came to San Francisco at 16. He also lived in Scotland and studied architecture at California College of the Arts and Columbia University before establishing Mork Ulnes Architects back in San Francisco. That’s an unusually lengthy introduction, granted, to an unusual small project in the Sonoma Valley town of Glen Ellen. Mork-Ulnes had remodeled the property’s original house for its previous owners. The new ones, a family of five, brought him back for a guesthouse. At 840 square feet, it comprises three volumes, each of which contains a bedroom and a bathroom. They’re arranged in a stepped configuration, sharing party walls and a canted roof but no internal corridor. Read more about this project

Read more: 10 Bright and Modern Beach Houses

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

The historic Hôtel Dieu in Lyon has been transformed into a luxury hotel and complex

 

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Groves & Co. Brings Subtle Luxury to an Executive Suite for Michael Kors

PROJECT NAME Michael Kors Executive Suite
LOCATION New York
FIRM Groves & Co.
SQ. FT. 2,000 SQF

A fast pace and high pressure are mainstays in the world of fashion superstar Michael Kors and his husband, fashion designer Lance Le Pere. But they like their surroundings understated and serene. For years, they have been drawn to the layered modernism of Groves & Co., which designed their three residences in New York and Florida. When it came time to renovate the 2,000-square-foot executive suite where Kors and Le Pere work, they asked Russell Groves to bring his subtle luxury there as well.

Inside the executive suite at the Michael Kors headquarters, a Mart Stam chair stands on a wool rug in the office of creative director Lance Le Pere. Photography by Tim Williams.

In the same building as the Manhattan headquarters of Michael Kors, the clothing and accessories company, which recently acquired Versace for approximately $2 billion, the office consists of four main areas arranged in an enfilade: reception, conference room, and an office each for Kors and Le Pere, who is the creative director of the women’s collection.

Custom walnut desks outfit reception. Photography by Tim Williams.

 

“Unlike his public persona, Michael’s personal aesthetic is quite pulled back,” Groves begins. “He works with color all day long, so he requested a neutral space.” The walls and ceiling are painted white; black and grays appear in flooring and furniture, Groves playing with textures and finishes for visual interest. Walnut, oak, Italian marble, glass, and stainless steel compose the materials palette,  with faux fur blankets and pillows from the Michael Kors Collection and wool and leather details adding softness. Classic furnishings by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames and Florence Knoll are rooted in mid-century modernism.

Pieces by Florence Knoll, Paul McCobb, and Warren Platner furnish reception. Photography by Tim Williams.

 

The result is a calculated visual palate cleanser. “Russell immediately understood the combination of efficiency, elegance, comfort, and personality that are so important for our work environment,” Kors states. But simplicity, Groves suggests, is actually hard to engineer. “It’s like a fashion show,” he says. “Behind the screen it’s utter chaos. But when the model walks down the runway, it looks effortless.”

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

La Pere works at a custom marble-topped table. Photography by Tim Williams.
Kors’s office also includes a Charles and Ray Eames task chair and an ebonized-oak credenza by Knoll. Photography by Tim Williams.
The conference room is visible from reception through a series of pocket doors. Photography by Tim Williams.
Fabricius + Kastholm chairs face each other in Kors’s office, where flooring is oak. Photography by Tim Williams.

Read next: The Best of DIFFA Dining by Design 2019

> See more from the April 2019 issue of Interior Design

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

The 2019 edition of ICFF is just around the corner. From Sunday, May 19 to Tuesday, May 21, ICFF will be open exclusively to trade professionals. New York City’s Javits Convention Center will host products by more than 900 exhibitors from over 60 countries in the high-end interiors space. With so much to see, Interior Design has selected a few standouts to preview ahead of the show. See 10 of them below.

Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini

AK/25 fixture by Paik Sun Kim for Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini. Booth 2163. Photography courtesy of Boffi and Fantini.

 

Boffi and Fantini‘s AK/25 fixture stands out for both its origami-inspired design and its innovation in the water-flow process.

arianeSké

Joy bar chair by Janine Hulsker for arianeSké. Booth 1827. Photography courtesy of arianeské. 

 

Dutch seating designer and manufacturer arianeSké began with a straightforward mission: to bring comfort back to high-end seating. The polished wooden backing of the Joy bar chair gives it a distinguished look.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

Bernhardt

Astra lounge chair by Cory Grosser for Bernhardt. Booths 1339 and 1325. Photography courtesy of Bernhardt.

 

Leave it to Cory Grosser to blend the best of precision—through geometric details and ease—in a curved silhouette. Grosser’s design of the Astra lounge chair for Bernhardt is suited to a variety of aesthetically different spaces.

 Brendan Ravenhill

Beam pendant from Brendan Ravenhill. Booth 857. Photography courtesy of Brendan Ravenhill.

 

Brendan Ravenhill‘s Beam light fixture responds to the efficiency and casting power of LED lighting with style. Beam makes use of bounced and refracted light to create a soft glow, in a strong linear silhouette.

Ceramics of Italy 

The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy. Booths 2229-2325. Photography courtesy of Ceramics of Italy.

 

A distinguished collection of porcelain slabs, The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy exudes drama and luxury. The four available patterns are inspired by exquisite marbles from three continents, with suitable applications ranging from flooring to walls and custom countertops. 

Kohler 

Sensate Touchless Kitchen Faucet with Kohler Konnect. Booth 2239. Photography courtesy of Kohler. 

 

A sleek, no-contact faucet is the stuff of culinary enthusiasts’ dreams. Kohler Konnect immerses users in experiential luxury, with the best of good design and intelligent technology.

Ocrúm

Orizon mirror by Ocrúm. Booth 1062. Photography courtesy of Ocrúm.

 

The Orizon mirror, part of Brooklyn-based design studio Ocrúm‘s debut collection, toes the line between art and functional decor. The rippled surface is evocative of a serene sea, and blends into a smooth colored sky.

Ross Gardam

Nebulae chandelier by Ross Gardam. Booth 1763. Photography by Ross Gardam. Photography © Hadyn Cattach.

 

Ross Gardam brings a redesigned version of his Nebulae chandelier to his eponymous design studio’s ICFF booth. The horizontal configuration is a new aspect of the chandelier’s design, and the uniquely-layered glass shows a highly original exploration of light’s diffusion.

Studio Henk

Co lounge chairs; 2.5 seat sofa (left) and single seat armchair (right) by Studio Henk. Booth 1827. Photography by Studio Henk.

 

The finishes of every piece offered by Studio Henk are fully customizable. The functional aesthetic of the Co lounge chair epitomizes modernism and, every detail, from the Kvadrat upholstery to the stain of the wood accents, can be changed to fit the mood of the space it’ll go into.

SkLO

Balance pendant by SkLO. Booth 957. Photography courtesy of SkLO.

 

The Balance pendant is emblematic of SkLO‘s emphasis on beauty and originality. The pendant’s soft curve and inherent asymmetry creates visual interest.

Read more: 2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage 

Continue reading Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

Designer Health: Meeting the Demands of Luxury and Lifestyle

2020 2020 DESIGN, 2020 FUSION, RECORDED WEBINARS DESIGN, RECORDED WEBINARS FUSION, UPCOMING WEBINARS DESIGN, UPCOMING WEBINARS FUSION, WEBINARS

Designer Health: Meeting the Demands of Luxury and Lifestyle

Eligible for NARI & NKBA CEU credits*


Health is the ultimate luxury. The discerning client of the present and the future is redefining the luxury lifestyle. No longer about mere beauty, the most successful and sought-after projects are now designed with health and well-being at the center. Premium materials with healthy finishes that are responsibly sourced are increasing in demand, and clients are willing to pay a premium for them. Like their organic, non-GMO groceries, the homes of today’s luxury clientele need to take care of them from the inside out.

Key Learning Points:

  • Discover the importance of incorporating healthy products into your design
  • Explore emerging materials and methods to effectively design for a health-conscious client
  • Recognize advantages of health-conscious design by reflecting on projects that have successfully employed these objectives

*This webinar is eligible for 1 NARI CEU credits and 0.1 NKBA CEU credits.

         


Watch Now

Meet the presenter:


Lauren Levant

Lauren Levant is an emerging leader in the luxury kitchen and bath design industry. She has been named among HGTV’s top 10 American Designers under 35, and selected as Designer of the Year by Viking Appliance. In the past five years, her distinctive designs have claimed more than twenty international, national and regional awards. Her projects have been featured widely in Elle Decor, Architectural Digest, Home & Design Magazine and the Washington Post, as well as in hardcover publications such as The Kitchen Bible: Designing the Perfect Culinary Space. www.laurenlevant.com

SHARE THIS POST

Continue reading Designer Health: Meeting the Demands of Luxury and Lifestyle

Webinar: Design Heatlh – Meeting The Demands of Luxury & Life Style

Designer Health: Meeting the Demands of Luxury and Lifestyle

2020 2020 DESIGN, 2020 FUSION, RECORDED WEBINARS DESIGN, RECORDED WEBINARS FUSION, UPCOMING WEBINARS DESIGN, UPCOMING WEBINARS FUSION, WEBINARS

Designer Health: Meeting the Demands of Luxury and Lifestyle

Eligible for NARI & NKBA CEU credits*


Health is the ultimate luxury. The discerning client of the present and the future is redefining the luxury lifestyle. No longer about mere beauty, the most successful and sought-after projects are now designed with health and well-being at the center. Premium materials with healthy finishes that are responsibly sourced are increasing in demand, and clients are willing to pay a premium for them. Like their organic, non-GMO groceries, the homes of today’s luxury clientele need to take care of them from the inside out.

Key Learning Points:

  • Discover the importance of incorporating healthy products into your design
  • Explore emerging materials and methods to effectively design for a health-conscious client
  • Recognize advantages of health-conscious design by reflecting on projects that have successfully employed these objectives

*This webinar is eligible for 1 NARI CEU credits and 0.1 NKBA CEU credits.

         


Watch Now

Meet the presenter:


Lauren Levant

Lauren Levant is an emerging leader in the luxury kitchen and bath design industry. She has been named among HGTV’s top 10 American Designers under 35, and selected as Designer of the Year by Viking Appliance. In the past five years, her distinctive designs have claimed more than twenty international, national and regional awards. Her projects have been featured widely in Elle Decor, Architectural Digest, Home & Design Magazine and the Washington Post, as well as in hardcover publications such as The Kitchen Bible: Designing the Perfect Culinary Space. www.laurenlevant.com

SHARE THIS POST

Continue reading Webinar: Design Heatlh – Meeting The Demands of Luxury & Life Style

Industry Pros Share Top Outdoor Kitchen And Living Room Trends

 

Outdoor kitchens topped the project trends list in the latest American Institute of Architects’ survey, which is not terribly surprising, given people’s love of living outside. But the survey didn’t go into detail on what homeowners are putting into those spaces. As we move into the warmer months, it’s worth looking at what’s popular for outdoor kitchens and their related living areas.

Luxury moves outdoors

“Homeowners are seeking the sanctuary of outdoor living spaces – both for entertaining and unwinding,” shares Atlanta-based landscape designer David Bennett. These spaces are likely to have architectural structures like pergolas, walls, custom fireplaces, hedges and varying elevations to create privacy and distinct rooms with a natural indoor-outdoor flow, he notes. “Divided living spaces encourage conversation gathering, including screening areas for watching the big game or a movie, and heating and cooling systems to ensure year-round use.” These outdoor rooms may also be equipped with water, light and fire design features, as well as heating and cooling systems for year-round use, he says.

Outdoor kitchens are getting more elaborate, both for entertaining and relaxing.

Outdoor kitchens are getting more elaborate, both for entertaining and relaxing.

LYNX, AVAILABLE THROUGH FERGUSON BATH, KITCHEN & LIGHTING GALLERY.

Premium cooking

“In the past, many homeowners focused solely on their grill, and perhaps some outdoor seating,” recalls Mary Hannah Fout, senior marketing manager with Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery.“Today, many homeowners are accompanying the grill with a fully functioning built-in kitchen complete with sink and faucet, refrigeration, dishwasher, ice machine, beverage unit, pizza oven, weather resistant cabinets and more. Smart appliances are becoming very popular and it comes as no surprise that smart technology is also trending in the outdoor kitchen,” she comments. “Many grills and smokers are now wi-fi enabled, some even have voice recognition,” she adds.

Outdoor kitchens are getting equipped with pizza ovens and other gourmet appliances.

Outdoor kitchens are getting equipped with pizza ovens and other gourmet appliances.

LYNX, AVAILABLE THROUGH FERGUSON BATH, KITCHEN & LIGHTING GALLERY

Even with all of the extras, the grill is still king of the outdoor kitchen. “No longer is stainless steel the only option,” Fout declares. “Grills are available in bright red, sunny yellow, royal blue, hunter green, and more! The ability to customize your outdoor space allows the homeowner to complement the surrounding landscape and views or extend the home’s décor into the exterior.”

Style coordination

This is also true for flooring that can extend seamlessly from interior to exterior, coordinating cabinetry and wall-width, track-free doors that completely open rooms to each other. “Exactly as the interior kitchen and bathroom design trends have shifted towards more sleek and modular aesthetics, so too have outdoor designs,” comments landscaper, contractor and designer Joe Raboine, now director of residential hardscape for outdoor products manufacturer Belgard. “To mirror the look inside the home, homeowners are choosing longer, linear plank pavers outdoors, and playing more with texture and color than in the past. This trend extends beyond modern homes, with this look translating to every home style.”

Outdoor living areas are sharing contemporary styles with their indoor counterparts.

Outdoor living areas are sharing contemporary styles with their indoor counterparts.

BELGARD

Nature connection

“There is a growing awareness about the importance of individuals being connected to nature,” Raboine observes. “That is why you see vertical gardening and the integration of container gardens adjacent to outdoor cooking areas. There is also an increased awareness of how an outdoor space can enhance the habitat, specifically through permeable pavers and plant choices, which can help with water drainage and more.”

Cassy Aoyagi, president of Los Angeles area-based FormLA Landscaping. acknowledges the strong nature connection, too, especially for cooking. “What we see now is increased interest in having edibles integrated into gardens, particularly in areas close to their outdoor kitchens,” she shares. “This has taken the form of grape vine fencing and raised beds where grabbing herbs for the table requires just a step or two.”

Edible plants add nature and nutrition to outdoor cooking.

Edible plants add nature and nutrition to outdoor cooking.

FORMLA LANDSCAPING/LESLY HALL PHOTOGRAPHY

Technology enhancements

An outdoor living area’s natural elements might hide speakers and wiring, as well as irrigation and security tied to smart home controls. According to CEDIA, the association for home technology professionals, homeowners and their consultants are taking on far more projects and spending far more money outdoors than in past years. Outdoor televisions are a major category. So are outdoor speakers.

Outdoor living areas are getting more luxurious high tech features.

Outdoor living areas are getting more luxurious high tech features.

CEDIA/ARGUS TECHNOLOGIES

Last words

While outdoor kitchens and living areas are trending strongly and richly, with more enhancements than ever before, there are still many homeowners who are likely to drag a comfy chair and portable grill out on the porch or deck. It’s all about enjoying life outdoors, financing  nice, but not necessarily needed, for life’s simplest pleasures.

Continue reading Industry Pros Share Top Outdoor Kitchen And Living Room Trends

WHAT’S UP WITH PINEAPPLES AND PALM MOTIFS?

posted on 05/07/2018 By Kadie Yale

While not overwhelming, particular palm motifs consistently poked their head out from around booths during this year’s HD Expo, mirroring the notifications we receive in the form of press releases: palm fronds, abstracted and repeating, have continued to be used in the industry, particularly in the hospitality market.

Updated to match current trends, the use of palms has a very direct relation to the historic use of pineapples in American design. But why does the now-somewhat-kitschy use of pineapples and other lush tropical vegetation continue to be prevalent in American design, and what does it mean for contemporary interiors?

Interestingly, pineapples are one of the design staples brought over to the colonies from England. The fruit is said to have been brought back to Europe during Christopher Columbus’ second voyage, and its many versions–from candied to jam–became a must-have in the upper echelons of society. However, access to raw and unprocessed pineapple was a luxury even those at the top of the class structure could hardly get ahold of.

Transporting the fruit in time meant it had to be shipped on the quickest boats in the fleet, and few were able to make it before turning. Therefore, it became a status symbol to be able to have the fresh fruit. Even King Charles II commissioned a portrait with a pineapple in-hand. While transportation became easier along the North American seaboard as the colonies expanded, pineapples were still a costly commodity; they quickly became a preferred high-society hostess gift, thereby cementing its on-going legacy as a symbol of hospitality.

While pineapple motifs are still used, they somewhat lost their luster in the mid-20th century when technology and materiality allowed them to be incorporated into the growing middle class through goods like wallpaper and clothing textiles. The fruit took off in popular culture, due heavily to Hawai’i becoming a state on August 21, 1959. In the same ways that America saw Egyptian motifs in the 1920s after the discovery of King Tut or Japanese-influenced design in the mid-19th century, the welcoming of Hawai’i to the United States became exoticized.

A LONG HISTORY OF PINEAPPLE MOTIFS

Today, information can be easily found on the history of pineapple motifs in interior design, but for the most part, their use has continued more often because of the mid-20th-century inspiration. Ask an interior designer why they’ve chosen to use tropical foliage or a manufacturer why it’s entered their line, and the answers are typically in response to the fun aesthetic and relaxing aura pineapple and palms give off.

It’s an easy connection to say that pineapple icons evolved into the use of other tropical plants in decor, but I believe we can take it one step further to interweave the current importance of health and wellness into the reemergence of tropical prints.

As clients and end-users become more familiar with biomimicry and biophilic design, interior designers are searching for ways to bring nature indoors. With nature-inspired design on the rise, florals were reintroduced into interiors, but while pineapples mostly harken back to images of a 50’s father in a Hawaiian t-shirt next to the grill in a newly-developed suburb, florals have a tradition of easily crossing the line into appearing matronly (most likely due to gender bias, but that topic deserves its own article). Companies such as Tarkett have been able to release floral products in recent years, but they come alongside more abstracted designs to tone down the flower patterns.

PALM MOTIFS & FLOWERS

Working with flowers, and working with flowers well is a special skill few possess.

Tropical motifs, however, haven’t had the same type of gender bias that flowers have. The historical tie-in to hospitality may not be as direct as it was in the past, but the image of palms, pineapples, and birds of paradise still inspire the feeling of luxury, relaxation, and getting away from it all. Eliciting these emotions while also pulling in biophilic design principals packages the whole aesthetic into the perfect “Wish you were here!” statement.

Two notable instances during the HD Expo show were the use of more mid-century design and repeat by Innovations, and an abstracted block-print-like design by Fil Doux. In particular, these two examples show the main ways in which interior designers are using tropical greenery: in traditional, realistic ways (Innovations), or by breaking down the pattern to only its geometric elements (Fil Doux).

Designers can expect to continue to see pineapples, palms, and more tropically-integrated products in the coming years. While they may not take center-stage or be the highlight of the collection, they will continue to emerge.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

%d bloggers like this: