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FIVE EXPERTS ZERO IN ON THE YEAR’S BIGGEST PRODUCT TRENDS

BUILDER’s annual product guide rounds up some of the most interesting materials, technologies, and innovations in the residential realm.

Wood flooring in light shades is especially popular this year, such as in this dining room in Miller & Smith's Brambleton Garden District community in Virginia.
Courtesy Miller & SmithWood flooring in light shades is especially popular this year, such as in this dining room in Miller & Smith’s Brambleton Garden District community in Virginia.

The best residential products exemplify both the latest trends and greatest innovations that a newly constructed home can offer. To help sort through what’s shaping product selection this year, BUILDER asked five residential design experts for their take on the biggest trends facing home builders. The products showcased below reflect their trend forecasts in each of six product categories. The pros interviewed are:
–Lee Crowder, model branding manager for Darling Homes and Taylor Morrison
–Jay Endelman, president of Maryland-based builder Guild Craft Inc.
–Manny Gonzalez, principal of Southern California–based KTGY Architecture + Planning
Washington, D.C.–based developer and builder Sean Ruppert of OPaL
–Patti Wynkoop, vice president of product development and purchasing for Mid-Atlantic area home builder Miller & Smith.

EXTERIOR PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Exterior category.
Protective Finishes. Numerous exterior products are now designed to endure the extreme. Impact- and fire-resistant siding, from fiber cement to metal to hardwoods; shingles that withstand gusts up to 150 mph; and the time-tested use of shutters offer top-to-bottom protection.

Patty Wynkoop
Patty Wynkoop

Creative Privacy. Dense infill developments mean smaller yards with innovative privacy features for outdoor living. Inventive and customizable screening options include artistic fencing in unusual materials, vertical gardens, all-weather curtains, movable metal or wood panels, shoji screens, trellises, and pergolas. “We use unique design elements … to temper the close proximity of dense site plans,” says Wynkoop.

Modern Appeal. Contemporary designs and materials—larger expanses of glass, smooth surfaces, clean lines, flat or low-sloped rooflines, and commercial finishes—are in demand with buyers across the country. High-contrast color palettes such as white or pale gray with black window and door trim add a stylish touch to any architectural style. “Now we can get more creative with window and balcony placements, exterior skins, and colors,” says Gonzalez.

Al Fresco Spaces. Savvy builders provide buyers with lots of choices for outdoor amenities, including fireplaces or pits, outdoor kitchens and wet bars, entertainment equipment, and natural materials like wood and stone. “Roof decks and balconies are giving way to patios and terraces directly off kitchens and dining and living rooms,” says Ruppert.

INTERIOR PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Interior category.
Healthy Homes. Along with sustainability and energy efficiency, consumers are more educated than ever about products affecting healthy indoor air quality. They demand low- or no-VOC paints and sealants, formaldehyde-free cabinets and adhesives, antimicrobial surfaces, and whole-house water
and air purification systems.

Sean Ruppert
Sean Ruppert

Wood Flooring. Hardwood flooring finishes skew lighter with natural, unstained varietals taking center stage. Products mimicking wood are also increasing in popularity, such as porcelain tile and laminate. “People finally warmed up to engineered and vinyl wood floors. Either they warmed up or products got much better—probably both,” says Ruppert.

Open Inside to Out. Open floor plans went from a trend to common practice, but now they extend visually in all directions—even outside—and dominate throughout all house sizes, styles, and types. Interior courtyards, breezeways, and open-air entryways appeal to buyers of all ages, from young families to empty nesters. “Perhaps the biggest trend in interior space is exterior space,” says Gonzalez. “More and more, interior areas open up to exterior areas to create a lively indoor–outdoor experience.”

Artisan Accents. Consumers enjoy expressing their creativity and supporting craftspeople by selecting unique, handmade products. Even big box home furnishing stores like Target and Ikea offer limited-edition artisan collections. “Today’s consumer bypasses anything mass produced in exchange for artisan products, fixtures, and features,” says Wynkoop.

KITCHEN AND BATH PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Kitchen and Bath category.
High Contrast. White kitchens and baths remain popular, but with high contrasting finishes. “Black is a really important color for 2019 and you’ll be seeing it pop up everywhere—from countertops to hardware and faucets—and paired with stark white cabinets,” says Crowder.

Lee Crowder
Lee Crowder

Plumbing Choices. A proliferation of finishes for plumbing fixtures and fittings allows homeowners to show off their personal style. Gold-plated, matte black, copper, brass, nickel, bronze, pewter, and chrome are all available across various price points in styles ranging from elaborate to sleek. “We’re seeing a revival of gold and bronze fixtures as designers mix metals in their palettes, similar to today’s fashion jewelry trends,” says Wynkoop.

Attractive & Accessible. Stylish universal design products are popping up in housing for all ages. Many of these products do double duty, such as towel racks or shower shelves acting as grab bars and spacious, no-threshold showers with built-in bench seats that also serve as shelves.

Island Living. Larger, decked-out kitchen islands continue to trend in most housing types and sizes. Treating the island like a piece of furniture is a new look, however, with islands having legs or even wheels for flexibility and more personalized style.

Floating Fixtures. Wall-hung vanities, cabinets, and toilets help the bathroom look larger and generate a sleek, serene atmosphere. Floating cabinetry and wall-hung toilets make spaces look and feel larger as the floor runs under the pieces and gives a more expansive aesthetic.

STRUCTURAL PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Structural category.
Cross-Laminated Timber. Cross-laminated timber is becoming popular as structural material even for taller buildings and large expanses. The product offers the strength of concrete, but it’s more sustainable, lighter, and renewable, makers say. The product also offers fire and seismic resistance and produces minimal construction waste.

Jay Endelman
August HutchinsJay Endelman

Prefab Products. Prefabricated systems allow for faster construction, stronger building envelopes, and reduction of waste. Panelized walls, flooring and roof systems, insulated concrete blocks, modular framing components, and structural insulated panels also provide builders with consistent quality of materials. “Some of the newest structural systems have a huge impact on what can be built cost effectively,” says Gonzalez.

Roof Fasteners. Even with today’s lighter roofing materials, roof fasteners make sense on every house given the increased occurrence of extreme storms. They also improve roof stability and load allowances. “Building a house now requires more wind bracing and stronger framing,” says Ruppert.

Steel Framing. As building codes get stricter, steel is making inroads with single-family construction. The material provides strength; resistance to wind, fire, and floods; quick construction time with less waste; and design creativity. Steel also serves as an environmentally friendly option as it can be recycled after use. “Lateral wind loads have increased across the board, so steel framing in residential makes more sense and allows for more flexibility,” says Endelman.

SYSTEMS PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Systems category.
Long-Distance Control. Consumers want the ability to monitor and manipulate lights, locks, thermostats, audio/visual equipment, water heaters, and appliances when at home or away. Most electronic components are available in smart forms that homeowners can control with their phones and voice-activated devices. “Consumers are hungry to not only integrate their homes but also centralize the process rather than manage several separate apps for everything,” says Wynkoop.

Manny Gonzalez
Manny Gonzalez

Systems That Save. Resource- and cost-saving products like tankless or solar-powered water heaters and ductless HVAC systems reduce homeowners’ utility bills and make them feel good about preserving resources. “Some residents turn tracking their utilities into something of a ‘utility video game’ where they try to win the month by having the lowest energy usage ‘score,’” says Gonzalez.

Responsive HVAC. Manufacturers are responding to consumers’ desire for indoor comfort with heating and cooling products outfitted with high-tech features like UV air filtration, evaporative cooling, humidifying and dehumidifying, and maintenance alerts.

Home Control. Lights, blinds, and thermostats aren’t the only self-monitoring systems builders can offer as upgrades. Smart water valve controllers detect leaks and alert homeowners, or turn off the water automatically. Manufacturers also make sensors to detect problems throughout the home, from a door that’s been left open to an oven turned on, to provide added safety and peace of mind.

WINDOWS & DOORS PRODUCT TRENDS

Click here for a roundup of the newest products in the Windows & Doors category.
Peak Performance. For both windows and doors, savvy consumers demand higher thermal values along with improved impact and wind resistance. Using increased thermal values keeps indoor temperatures more stable, saving on heating and cooling costs, while windows and doors with higher
wind resistance can stand up to severe storms.

Door Design. Homeowners want the high-end look of wood and glass on doors for maximum curb appeal, added natural light, and as a personalized look for interior doors. “Wood-style front doors and matching arbors are a new trend even in contemporary homes,” notes Ruppert.

Window Walls. Window walls are becoming more common and less expensive. Many manufacturers offer bifold, accordion, or oversized sliding glass doors to heighten indoor–outdoor connections, frame views, and make spaces feel larger even with the door closed.

Think Big. For a “wow factor” to entice potential home buyers, an oversized window is the way to go. They are available in numerous sizes and options featuring fixed glass combined with a variety of operable panels. “We’re maximizing picture windows at sizes as large as 6×6 or 8×5 for an additional 40 square feet of glass,” says Wynkoop.

Black Trim. Black trim on windows and doors–inside and out—is trending across styles and price points. Darker shades of trim require less maintenance, make the glass look bigger, and provide a luxurious look for both contemporary and traditional designs.

SHELLEY D. HUTCHINS, LEED AP

Shelley D. Hutchins, LEED AP, writes about residential construction and design, sustainable building and living, and travel and health-care issues.

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9 days ago
Vincent Valles

Poor indoor air quality? Transform the walls of your home into a permanent air purification system. Simply add the ionic paint additive by Air-ReNu with interior house paint and apply the blended mixture to the walls. One application will remain effective for 8-12 years eliminating offensive smoking, cat urine odors and airborne toxins.

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Design For Daylighting

Brighten the outlook of building occupants and reduce lighting costs by bringing natural light inside.

By Jody Andres, AIA, LEED AP
From the April 2019 Issue

In today’s climate of sustainable design, it’s rare that a newly constructed facility or one being renovated does not include some level of eco-friendly features. Overlooked in the past, daylighting is one of those features and is no longer an afterthought. It could be argued that how to best use natural light should be a primary consideration in the design of any new facility. But why is it so important?

 

daylighting
Today’s schools typically include a significant number of windows on exterior walls, contributing to an environment where students and teachers can excel. (Photo: Hoffman Planning, Design & Construction)

The Physiological Perspective. The bottom line—daylight is good for us. Research has demonstrated the positive effects of exposure to natural light. Daylight has been shown to combat the effects of depression. It can help improve a person’s mood and maintain a calmer disposition. In addition, exposure to daylight is one of the primary ways we can get and maintain healthy vitamin D levels in our bodies.

When we incorporate windows and natural light into facilities, we’re helping fulfill a basic desire for a connection to light and nature. The biophilia hypothesis—introduced by Edward O. Wilson in his book, Biophilia—proposes that humans have a desire to seek out connections with nature and other forms of life. Biophilic design and planning increases access to nature, light, and biodiversity to reduce stress, promote healing, foster creativity, and improve cognitive function.

The Productivity Perspective. In the workplace, daylighting is a critical design element for employers and their facility planners to consider. Not only does daylighting and controlling artificial lights in the workplace save money, but it’s been proven to help create a more comfortable work environment and make employees more productive.

“Daylight and Productivity—A Field Study,” a study conducted by Mariana G. Figuerio, Mark S. Rea, and Anne C. Rea of the Lighting Research Center at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Richard G. Stevens from the University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Community Medicine, explored the occupancy rates, amount of time subjects spent on work-related tasks, and electric lighting operation in daylit and interior offices. They found that people located in windowed offices spent considerably more time (15%) on work-related tasks compared to employees in interior offices. These results matched their hypothesis that people who work in interior spaces would spend less time in their offices and be less productive than people working in windowed spaces.

When it comes to educational facilities, consider the results of the Heschong Mahone Daylighting Study (conducted by Heschong Mahone Group), which involved more than 21,000 students. Study results presented a significant correlation between learning spaces with natural light and student performance, finding that both reading and math scores improved for students in spaces with abundant daylight. Additionally, there was a 20% faster progression in math and a 26% faster progression in reading.

Meanwhile, school administrators are continually seeking the means to retain the best faculty and staff. Abundant daylight in well-designed work environment is sure to be looked at favorably by current and potential employees.

The Economic Perspective. While there are a bevy of health and production-related reasons to incorporate daylighting, we shouldn’t lose sight of the financial benefits. More natural light means a decreased need for artificial light. This trade-off reduces a building’s power consumption. Additionally, latent (passive solar) heat in the winter decreases the demand on heating systems.

EXAMINING DAYLIGHTING STRATEGIES

Whether in a school, office, or senior care facility, natural light can benefit building occupants by providing a healthier, more interesting, and dynamic environment in which to learn, work, or live. So, what are some of the best strategies to utilize when incorporating daylighting?

daylighting
The use of daylighting is key to providing employees with a comfortable, desirable work environment that helps increase their productivity. (Photo: Hoffman Planning, Design & Construction)

In the case of new construction, orientation of the building is critical. Siting the building on an east-west axis, with south- and north-facing windows is a key design strategy. And with technological advances, windows can be altered to control how much daylight will enter the space. When planning areas that will contain display equipment, such as high-definition televisions and whiteboards, the design team should take special care with window placement to control lighting levels and to prevent glare or blinding conditions in the space.

Daylighting and control options that are becoming standard design elements include sun control and shading devices, light shelves, clerestory windows, tubular daylight devices, and translucent skylight systems. In the case of a renovation, the use of natural light can be further enhanced by using window films to contain glare. While timers and motion sensors designed to reduce light levels are not new, the next wave of sensors actually measures daylight levels in a room (or portion of a room) and adjusts accordingly.

Although at first mention it seems counterintuitive, artificial lighting can contribute to a good daylighting strategy. A popular design element is the installation of direct-indirect lighting fixtures. With these, more than half of the light generated can be directed upward, reflecting off of the ceiling and other surfaces. This results in reduced glare, a more uniform ambient light level with fewer “hot” spots, the need for fewer artificial lights, and decreased energy use and costs.

MODELING AND ASSESSMENTS

Energy modeling and computer generated building models can be extremely helpful evaluation tools when determining daylighting strategies. Using these, facility owners and maintenance staff will not only be able to observe how natural light and views will exist in their building, but they’ll get an understanding of how much energy—namely in lighting and cooling—can be saved. Whether new construction or renovation, modeling should be incorporated to inform the design effort and guide decision-making. As early as possible, the project team should evaluate the most appropriate ways to bring daylight and views into a facility and how these will be integrated with artificial lighting and controls. As more design and product options are entered into modeling software, facility planners are able to make informed design decisions.

Another critical element to consider when pursuing daylighting is assessing lighting quality and levels compared to the visual tasks being performed. Not to be overlooked is controlling glare in environments awash in daylight. Building occupants will close blinds and shades if they decide too much daylight is obstructing their view. This not only removes views to the outside, but may also necessitate use of artificial lights.

When using natural light to help achieve lighting levels, the selection of window glass (based on the orientation of each window) is vital. While spaces that are over lit waste energy and money, occupant productivity may be negatively impacted by inadequate or poor quality lighting. As a guide for determining a good lighting level for most offices or educational spaces, daylight balanced with an average of 40 to 50 foot-candles of artificial light capability is ideal. (A common unit of measurement in the lighting industry, foot-candle is roughly defined as the amount of light that actually falls on a specific surface.)

The benefits of daylighting are numerous and should be enjoyed. When planning your next project, discuss potential strategies with your design team to create an environment where occupants can thrive.

daylightingAndres is a senior project architect and the K-12 market leader at Hoffman Planning, Design & Construction, Inc. in Appleton, WI. He is a LEED AP, past President of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Wisconsin, and the regional representative to the AIA Strategic Council.

Do you have a comment? Share your thoughts in the Comments section below or send an e-mail to the Editor at acosgrove@groupc.com.

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Measuring Up: Using Pre-and Post-Occupancy Evaluation to Assess High-Performance School Design

Jana Silsby

Speaker: Jana SilsbyAIA, LEED AP, MCPPO
Perkins Eastman

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Heather Jauregui

Speaker: Heather Jauregui LEED AP BD+C, O+M, CPHC, Assoc. AIA
Perkins Eastman

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Sean O’Donnell

Speaker: Sean O’Donnell FAIA, LEED AP
Perkins Eastman

View Bio

How does one know whether the design of a building has achieved its goals; what metrics and processes are necessary to ascertain project success; and how does a design firm develop a practice of evaluation to inform innovation? Join us for a discussion of how a new, comprehensive Pre- and Post-Occupancy Evaluation process is being developed for a design firm in order to collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative information that can demonstrate actual building performance. This process will be illustrated via a case study of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. School, a new PreK-8 school located in Cambridge, MA. The presenters will discuss the goals of the school, the process and design strategies implemented, and how the project success has been measured using a comprehensive Pre-OE/POE process including the collection of actual indoor environmental quality metrics and surveys of occupant perceptions.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define factors that create a 21st century learning healthy environment.
  2. Learn how sustainable design strategies can be used to improve occupant comfort and performance in school environments.
  3. Discover how a design firm is piloting a Pre-OE and POE process to develop environmental protocols for research initiatives.
  4. Understand how to evaluate the success of a design project using quantitative and qualitative data including indoor environmental quality metrics.

Co-produced by EDmarket and ASID

EDmarket
ASID Logo

Title: Measuring Up: Using Pre-and Post-Occupancy Evaluation to Assess High-Performance School Design
Date: Wednesday, April 17, 2019
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM (EST)
Price: Members: FREE
Non-Members: FREE
Register
Credit: 1 AIA LU/HSW

Pedagogical and Technology Trends in Education

Nancy Strum

Speaker: Nancy StrumPrincipal Consultant / Learning Space Consultant
The Sextant Group

View Bio

Campuses are shifting to new and exciting learning space models that provide real opportunities for architectural design innovation. During this webinar, we will explore emerging pedagogies and enabling technologies and the related planning, design, and infrastructure issues that architects face in designing contemporary buildings for education.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discuss how student demographics and new pedagogies are changing expectations for higher education facilities.
  2. Define how emerging technologies are impacting the design of educational facilities of the future.
  3. Adapt architectural and interior design to meet new pedagogical options.
  4. Apply how emerging technologies will impact the programming of architecture for higher education.

Title: Pedagogical and Technology Trends in Education
Date: Wednesday, May 8, 2019
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM (EST)
Price: Members: FREE
Non-Members: FREE
Register
Credit: 1 AIA LU

ASID Events

NATIONAL
MAY
19
ICFF

DESCRIPTION

ICFF is North America’s platform for global design. Over 900 exhibitors from across the globe showcase what’s best and what’s next for luxury interior design to more than 38,000 design industry attendees each year in New York.

 

DATE AND TIME

8:00 AM
5/19/2019 – 5/22/2019

LOCATION

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
655 W. 34th St.
New York, NY 10001
United States

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ICFF offers an unparalleled opportunity to view innovative design trends from across the globe and experience interactive, educational programming led by the industry’s leading designers and icons. Architects, interior designers, visual merchandisers, and developers visit ICFF each year for inspiration and concepts to apply in their next design project.

HIGHLIGHTS OF ICFF

  • ICFF Talks
    Positioned on the show floor, ICFF Talks features design visionaries and leaders who share insight and knowledge as it relates to the interior design world
  • ICFF Studio
    In its 14th year, ICFF and Bernhardt Design bring the next crop of emerging designers to the forefront through the juried ICFF Studio competition
  • NYCxDESIGN Awards & Party
    Presented by Interior Design Magazine and ICFF, the NYCxDESIGN Awards & Party is a highlight of NYCxDESIGN, New York’s annual celebration of design that attracts hundreds of thousands of attendees and designers from across the globe

ASID AT ICFF

ASID is thrilled to showcase the impact of design at ICFF, engage with visitors, and explore the beautiful, impactful, and sometimes surprising ways that design impacts lives. We’ll also provide timely and relevant education sessions each day.

 

Sunday, May 19

12 – 1 p.m. Aging in Place in an Urban Environment: New Design Solutions
Speakers: TBD

How do we design housing to accommodate multiple generations with different needs, incorporating cutting-edge solutions for flexibility and accessibility? Learn how multi-family and community housing in urban environments is evolving to reflect new family structures and an aging population. You’ll come away with practical ideas to help you create flexible living spaces to fit and adapt to the current trends of universal and accessible design.

Monday, May 20

12 – 1 p.m. Creating Purpose-Driven Spaces: What Does it Look Like to Leverage Design for Good?
Speaker: Meena Krenek, ASID, LEED BD+C

Human emotion is uniquely tied to human behavior. An individual’s emotional connection to a space, environment, or culture can provide a strong sense of belonging. This is valuable for developing engagement within spaces we design. As designers, we have the ability to impact behaviors through our design decisions. We must be mindful of this power as we seek a deeper meaning, experience, or contribution to society with our work. It’s important to continuously understand our audience and build spaces that represent a greater purpose and relationship to the activities that happen within, inspiring users and reaching their hearts and minds. In today’s world, everything is so highly competitive and constantly evolving that when designers create purpose-driven spaces, they develop a level of captivation and engagement with the environment which sets them apart.

Meena Krenek, ASID, LEED BD+C

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Tuesday, May 21

12 – 1 p.m. Business Skills for Creatives: What You Need to Know About Contracts and Fees
Speaker: Phyllis Harbinger, ASID, NCIDQ, CID

The contract between you and your client is a legal document, and plays a critical role in setting the tone and establishing yourself as a professional. Every contract includes a section on Designer Compensation, and we’ll show you how to effectively present your fee structure to reflect the true value of your design services, giving you guidelines and tips so that you can maximize profits. Gain insight and strategies to help you establish the right price point for your creative skills, services, and design vision – ensuring business profitability and success.

Phyllis Harbinger, ASID, NCIDQ, CID

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THE ASID DESIGN IMPACT AWARDS

The ASID DESIGN IMPACT Awards recognize innovative products that put people and the environment at the center of design intent. Winning products will be featured by exhibitors at ICFF.

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Design in Dialogue

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Quality Products Needed To Meet Green Building Standards Today

Sustainable healthcare facilities will need energy-efficient building enclosures from the outset.

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USGBC Lists Top States For Sustainable Building Design

By Anne DiNardo, Executive Editor | February 12, 2018 


The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released its eighth annual list of top 10 states for LEED. The list looked at 2010 U.S Census data and commercial and institutional green building projects that were certified in 2017 to rank states in terms of certified square feet per resident.

Massachusetts retained the top spot for the second year in a row, with 130 projects representing 4.48 square feet of space per resident. Three states—Georgia, Hawaii, and Minnesota—returned to the list for the first time since 2014, while Illinois and Colorado mark the only states to have made the list every year since its inception.

 

Within the healthcare sector, the USGBC reports 76 healthcare projects in the U.S. achieved LEED certification in 2017, which represent more than 8.9 million gross square feet of space. Among the top 10 states, there were 41 healthcare projects certified representing more than 4.9 million gross square feet of space.

The top 10 states for LEED in 2017 include:

Ranking:              State:                     GSF per capita:   Number of projects certified:

1              Massachusetts                        4.48                                  130

2             New York                                 3.39                                  192

3              Illinois                                     3.38                                  135

4              Hawaii                                     3.32                                  16

5             Maryland                                 2.75                                  105

6              Minnesota                              2.45                                  47

7             Georgia                                    2.44                                   71

8             California                                2.40                                  475

9              Virginia                                  2.32                                   152

10           Colorado                                 2.27                                   76

(As a federal territory, Washington, D.C., is not included in the ranking but led the country with 39.83 gross square feet per resident in 2017.)

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7 Beautiful, Family-Owned Wineries That Are Working to Save the Planet

With an ever-growing interest in the field of architecture to go green, it should come as little surprise that agricultural architecture—specifically that of wineries—has seen a surge in promoting sustainability. From tasting rooms to storage facilities to offices, new buildings at wineries across North America are being constructed with eco-friendly technology to reduce the impact of the wineries on the natural environment. And, impressively, many of these wineries are family-owned. Here are seven of our favorite wineries that have structures with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.

 

Photo: Damion I. Hamilton / Courtesy of Silver Oak

Silver Oak Winery, Oakville, California

Founded by friends Raymond Twomey Duncan and Justin Meyer in 1972, Silver Oak, which is still owned and operated by the Duncan family, was the first production winery in the world to receive LEED Platinum certification—the highest level of sustainability recognition by the U.S. Green Building Council. In addition to features like solar panels and night-air cooling, the winery has replaced its lawn with turf, which saves about one million gallons of water a year. Silver Oak is also working on opening a second, even “greener” location, which might become the first net-zero energy, net-zero water production winery in the world (pictured here).

“As an American heritage winery, we care about the message our product sends and so do our loyal Silver Oak fans. Our goal in building green was to create sustainable methods that could be replicated moving forward, to advance the green methods wineries have at their fingertips,” Silver Oak CEO David Duncan tells AD.

Photo: Joe Reeder

Hall St. Helena, St. Helena, California

The Hall family’s St. Helena winery became the first in California to receive LEED Gold certification in 2009, following up with additional LEED Gold certifications for its tasting room and production facility. Its sustainable elements include renewable energy systems (like solar power), an advanced stormwater runoff catchment process, and the use of recycled material in its shipping boxes, among many others.

Photo: Courtesy of Shale Oak Winery

Shale Oak Winery, Paso Robles, California

Owned by Al Good, a California transplant by way of Virginia, Shale Oakreceived LEED Silver certification for its tasting room, which has an impressive stained-glass facade and adjacent processing facility. Natural sunlight helps illuminate the interiors during the day, thanks to sun tubes and large windows, a rooftop solar array provides renewable energy, and a rainwater catchment and graywater systems help reduce the winery’s water usage.

 

Continue reading 7 Beautiful, Family-Owned Wineries That Are Working to Save the Planet

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