Tag Archives: Kitschy

I Photographed The Best And Worst Restrooms Around Cleveland (52 Pics)

Somebody once said that to understand society at a given point in time, look at their restrooms.

That somebody was me. I don’t know if it is true because I just made that up, but it can certainly feel like the decor and functionality of restrooms, both public and private, say a lot about us and the times we are living in – even if the restroom itself is stuck in time. Do you prefer them looking sterile and harsh? Cozy and kitschy? Luxurious to a fault? Basic and no-frills? High-tech? Perhaps you prefer them done with decor that makes no sense, executed with reckless abandon for any and all design rules as though a monkey on amphetamines went through a curbside dumpster and thought, “yes, this will be perfect!”

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#1

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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jamie1707 2 days agooh dear god! someone slipped me some brown acid!

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For five years, I’ve been documenting the restrooms around Cleveland that I happened to find myself in. It started as a joke on Instagram, and just kept going. I can’t quite articulate what the criteria were, but my gut always told me when it was something worth a photo. These are interiors that rarely get documented unless they are designed as “selfie bait”. Sure, some restrooms clearly had a big budget, but it is always interesting to see what can be done with a meager budget. Documenting is important because you never know what will be gone tomorrow.

#2

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Night Owl 1 day agoI’d spend too much time in there

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#3

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Krazy Kanuck 1 day agoSitting high on the throne

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In the short number of years since I started this project as a fun hashtag #restroomsofcleveland, several of these restrooms have been redone or have disappeared completely. The gentrification of cities has erased character and replaced it with subway tiles and Edison bulbs; the rustbelt has been slowly following the “AirSpace” aesthetic much to my disappointment.

#4

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Hazel Beswick 6 hours agoThis should be above the urinals… ohhhh the judgement!

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#5

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Reagan James 23 hours agoMy brain is kind of aching right now.

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Bars, theaters, warehouses, grocery stores, private clubs, pinball arcades, museums, schools, churches, furniture stores, and coffee shops are just some of the places you will find in the photo book I compiled – simply titled “The Restrooms of Cleveland.” It is a testament to the fact I hydrate often and have a weak bladder with little regard for location. I wish I had time to tell you my own stories within these facilities; exposed electrical wire, celebrity sightings, girl fights, dance parties, vomit, perfect selfie lighting, and unpaid counseling sessions. There was the time I found myself on my knees under a bride’s dress to fix a mishap, the time I tried desperately to keep the makeshift door closed with one foot while in the dressing room reserved for strippers, and the time a raccoon visited me while minding my own damn business! I’ve seen it all in Cleveland, Ohio, man.

#6

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Reagan James 23 hours ago (edited)So say that when you’ve already walked into the bathroom?

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#7

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bean59 1 day agoGLADYS, WHERE DID YOU PUT THE CHAINSAW?

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#8

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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bananapower_2.0 1 day agolook like the kids got ahold of the makers

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#9

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Donna Reynolds 1 day agoAnd I thought the last one was creepy.

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#10

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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LaDonna Hulcy 2 days agoI Love this one!

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#11

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Amy Smith 1 day agoThis looks like the ladies in the old Montague Arms in New Cross

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#12

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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NAOMI CORBALEY 1 day ago😑😕 da- faq?

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#13

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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EllieGirl 12 hours agowhat is he or she so afraid of?

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#14

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bean59 1 day agoWho threw up in the sink

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#15

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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NAOMI CORBALEY 1 day agothis looks like the mens bathroom

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#16

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bob Beltcher 8 hours agoBut what if someone is blind. The only way they would know is to feel up each bust.

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#17

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Reagan James 22 hours agoI like it!

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#18

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Karin Gibson 1 day agoI love the bentwood chair.

#20

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Kathy Smith 1 day agoLooks like an old elevator.

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#21

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Annemarie Mattheyse 1 day agoI love the black-and-white/teal combination. It’s very calming, somehow.

#23

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Molly Porter 1 day agoThis one looks normal

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#24

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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EllieGirl 1 day agothe sign

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#27

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Let’s All Just Try And Be Decent 5 hours agoKind of obviously a dressing room for actors to get ready for theatre shows…. not a bathroom. I’m

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#28

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Night Owl 1 day agoThe (probably plastic) flowers are a nice touch

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#29

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Molly Porter 1 day agoThe wood is so pretty on this one

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#30

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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glowworm2 1 day agoIs this a bathroom for clowns?

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#32

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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jamie1707 2 days agoThat is a cool radiator.

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#34

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bob Beltcher 7 hours agoMaking drywall damage fun

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#37

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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ZoeIsHahaha 14 hours agoAhh I see what they’re doing they’re trying to sell

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#39

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Donna Reynolds 1 day agoGrandma says “Did you wash your hands”?

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#40

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Annette Christopherson 12 hours agoDifferent perspectives.

#42

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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E Menendez 1 day agoThat’s a lot of soap for one sink.

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#43

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bean59 1 day agolooks like rey’s lightsaber

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#44

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bean59 1 day agolet me just throw mysel off a cliff…

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#45

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Kathy Smith 1 day agoI love that old sink.

#46

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Annette Christopherson 12 hours agoSeeing double.

#49

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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What’s In Your Head? 1 day agoAre those old drops of blood? o___O

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#52

I Spent Five Years Photographing Bathrooms In Cleveland.

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Bean59 1 day agohow does a picture on the wall make the bathroom interesting…?

Continue reading I Photographed The Best And Worst Restrooms Around Cleveland (52 Pics)

WHAT’S UP WITH PINEAPPLES AND PALM MOTIFS?

posted on 05/07/2018 By Kadie Yale

While not overwhelming, particular palm motifs consistently poked their head out from around booths during this year’s HD Expo, mirroring the notifications we receive in the form of press releases: palm fronds, abstracted and repeating, have continued to be used in the industry, particularly in the hospitality market.

Updated to match current trends, the use of palms has a very direct relation to the historic use of pineapples in American design. But why does the now-somewhat-kitschy use of pineapples and other lush tropical vegetation continue to be prevalent in American design, and what does it mean for contemporary interiors?

Interestingly, pineapples are one of the design staples brought over to the colonies from England. The fruit is said to have been brought back to Europe during Christopher Columbus’ second voyage, and its many versions–from candied to jam–became a must-have in the upper echelons of society. However, access to raw and unprocessed pineapple was a luxury even those at the top of the class structure could hardly get ahold of.

Transporting the fruit in time meant it had to be shipped on the quickest boats in the fleet, and few were able to make it before turning. Therefore, it became a status symbol to be able to have the fresh fruit. Even King Charles II commissioned a portrait with a pineapple in-hand. While transportation became easier along the North American seaboard as the colonies expanded, pineapples were still a costly commodity; they quickly became a preferred high-society hostess gift, thereby cementing its on-going legacy as a symbol of hospitality.

While pineapple motifs are still used, they somewhat lost their luster in the mid-20th century when technology and materiality allowed them to be incorporated into the growing middle class through goods like wallpaper and clothing textiles. The fruit took off in popular culture, due heavily to Hawai’i becoming a state on August 21, 1959. In the same ways that America saw Egyptian motifs in the 1920s after the discovery of King Tut or Japanese-influenced design in the mid-19th century, the welcoming of Hawai’i to the United States became exoticized.

A LONG HISTORY OF PINEAPPLE MOTIFS

Today, information can be easily found on the history of pineapple motifs in interior design, but for the most part, their use has continued more often because of the mid-20th-century inspiration. Ask an interior designer why they’ve chosen to use tropical foliage or a manufacturer why it’s entered their line, and the answers are typically in response to the fun aesthetic and relaxing aura pineapple and palms give off.

It’s an easy connection to say that pineapple icons evolved into the use of other tropical plants in decor, but I believe we can take it one step further to interweave the current importance of health and wellness into the reemergence of tropical prints.

As clients and end-users become more familiar with biomimicry and biophilic design, interior designers are searching for ways to bring nature indoors. With nature-inspired design on the rise, florals were reintroduced into interiors, but while pineapples mostly harken back to images of a 50’s father in a Hawaiian t-shirt next to the grill in a newly-developed suburb, florals have a tradition of easily crossing the line into appearing matronly (most likely due to gender bias, but that topic deserves its own article). Companies such as Tarkett have been able to release floral products in recent years, but they come alongside more abstracted designs to tone down the flower patterns.

PALM MOTIFS & FLOWERS

Working with flowers, and working with flowers well is a special skill few possess.

Tropical motifs, however, haven’t had the same type of gender bias that flowers have. The historical tie-in to hospitality may not be as direct as it was in the past, but the image of palms, pineapples, and birds of paradise still inspire the feeling of luxury, relaxation, and getting away from it all. Eliciting these emotions while also pulling in biophilic design principals packages the whole aesthetic into the perfect “Wish you were here!” statement.

Two notable instances during the HD Expo show were the use of more mid-century design and repeat by Innovations, and an abstracted block-print-like design by Fil Doux. In particular, these two examples show the main ways in which interior designers are using tropical greenery: in traditional, realistic ways (Innovations), or by breaking down the pattern to only its geometric elements (Fil Doux).

Designers can expect to continue to see pineapples, palms, and more tropically-integrated products in the coming years. While they may not take center-stage or be the highlight of the collection, they will continue to emerge.

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