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Tag Archives: Jesse Dorris

Asthetique Group’s The Y in Moscow is Ready Made for Millennials

Custom wallpaper defines the second floor’s main dining room, with gray chairs by Saba and peach chairs by Kristalia. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.

Millennials aren’t just about avocado toast, although the distinctive green, often mixed with peach, is a clear menu favorite around the world. The Y—a new 6,000-square-foot eatery in Moscow featuring a first floor with two open kitchens and 200 seats divided between a casual dining area and coffee shop and formal areas up above—is a textbook example of that generation’s preferred flavor.

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“We took inspiration from how the ‘70s vibe touched on this generation,” a look that’s prevalent throughout the city’s up-and-coming Hamovniki neighborhood, says designer Alina Pimkina of New York City-based Asthetíque Group, who headed up the project with partner Julien Albertini.

The floors of the large private dining room are a checkerboard of white and brown marble and oak; chairs are by ABC and the tables and velvet-covered banquettes are custom. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.

The pair also name-checked film director Wes Anderson as a muse; his love of ornament and obsessive symmetry clearly inspired the brass birdcage-like lighting above neat rows of custom chairs in the first-floor dining area. “We pay extreme attention to detail,” says Albertini, “and that makes the place feel very unique, modern, and luxurious.” Rather like the restaurant’s clientele itself.

Keep scrolling for more images from this project >

In the first-floor dining area, custom brass sconces hang over custom oak tables; the gray-teal chairs are by Poiat. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.
A white marble countertop with a brass sheet metal face defines the open kitchen’s bar, featuring a brass and fluted glass overhang. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov. 
Near the entrance, a cafe layers a custom marble-topped oak counter with a column covered in Midas’s liquid brass and chairs by &tradition. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.
Bahia chairs gather in the small private dining room on the second floor, which also features custom lighting, tables, and curtains. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.
The men’s bathroom on the second floor features a perforated metal and concrete cabinet with custom bronze mirrors and Dornbracht faucets. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov. 
The walls of the women’s bathroom on the first floor are oak or stainless steel, the latter with a gradated polish from opaque to mirror. Photography by Mikhail Loskutov.

Read more: Birch by DA Architecture Bureau: 2018 Best of Year Winner for Casual Dining

Continue reading Asthetique Group’s The Y in Moscow is Ready Made for Millennials

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Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

When the Apollo 11 came to rest in the lunar Sea of Tranquility on July 20th, 1969 and began transmitting back to Earth grainy black-and-white images of a spider-legged ship, pale figures within shiny helmets, and, a bit later, magisterial photographs of Earth itself against the black void of space, the human race’s conception of itself changed forever. The voyage inspired political realignments and countless scientific breakthroughs; it also inspired the look and feel of a number of cultural masterpieces, from Brian Eno’s 1983 ambient classic Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1971 stark sci-fi epic Solaris.

Architecture and design took that giant leap for mankind along with Neil Armstrong. In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing, we spoke to innovators in the industry about their own lunar inspirations.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20
Perilune by Suzanne Tick for Luum Textiles. Photography courtesy of Luum Textiles.

Suzanne Tick, creative director, Luum Textiles

As a child, the textile designer Suzanne Tick watched the landing from her home in Bloomington, Illinois. “What was riveting to me was the sound of someone on the moon and his buoyancy,” Tick says. “I had this realization that a person can be on the moon while I’m sitting at home and he could also be floating!” Since then, the moon has been an important force in her life. “I’ve lived by the MoMA Moon Charts and they have played a large part in my consciousness. A poignant time in my life was 2009, 2010, and 2011 which coincided with the last three years of my father’s life, my marriage, and my son living with me. For this reason, I wove a triptych of each of these years and sewed them together as a reminder of that shift in my life.” This design became Perilune, a printed polyurethane which was introduced through Luum.

Long Dock Park in Beacon, New York by Gary R. Hilderbrand. Photography by James Ewing.

Gary R. Hilderbrand, FASLA FAAR; principal, Reed Hilderbrand; Peter Louis Hornbeck Professor in Practice, Harvard Graduate School of Design

“Because my Aunt and grandmother had a large color TV, anything momentous like this we watched in their living room,” says Gary Hilderbrand. “All gathered ‘round for the moon landing. It’s singed on my brain.” The landscape architect would go on to transform a brownfield in Beacon, New York, into a waterfront parkland with site-specific work by artist George Trakas and two buildings by ARO. “Apollo amplified my instincts about knowing our place in the world and a sense that we somehow had technological knowledge to improve it,” he says. “Seeing these missions orbiting around the other side of the moon, and then exploring its surface, gave me hope that we could right our own environmental mess and craft a smarter, saner landscape. That way of seeing the Earth descended directly from the Apollo 8 ‘earthrise’ photograph. Who would not be affected by that image?!”

SiriusXM’s New York Headquarters and Broadcast Center by Michael Kostow. Photography by Adrian Wilson.

Michael Kostow, founding principal, Kostow Greenwood Architects

Satellite radio wouldn’t exist without the technological breakthroughs of the Apollo mission, so it made perfect sense to have a space fan design the headquarters for one of its largest players, SiriusXM. “I watched the moon landing as a youngster and even had early aspirations of becoming an astronaut,” says Michael Kostow. “I later wanted to design space vehicles for NASA, would build and fly multi-stage model rockets, and even as an architecture graduate student had an early morning ‘party’ to drink Tang and watch the first launch of the space station with my classmates.” The compact efficiency of the capsules influenced his plan for the satellite broadcasting company: “We wanted to invoke simplicity and timelessness,” he says, “and allow the empty space to be an active player in setting the mood.” Mission accomplished.

Aerial and Half-Moon by Kelly Harris Smith for Skyline Design. Photography courtesy of Skyline Design.

Kelly Harris Smith, designer and creative director, Kelly Harris Smith

“I’ve never been on a rocket ship,” says designer Kelly Harris Smith, “but I have flown on an airplane and to this day I always request a window seat so I can peek out over the landscape.” The designer was born after the moon landing but carries the legacy of an aerial point of view into a collection for Chicago’s Skyline Design of glass panels with systems of micro-patterns within shapes and gradations of color over larger repeats. “It’s rooted in looking at the familiar in a new way,” she says, “which I have to imagine is what all astronauts experience looking back at Earth.”

Draper, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Photography by Mark Flannery.

Elizabeth Lowrey, principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects

“Watching the moon landing, even at such a young age, I was awed by the realization that anything is possible,” says Elizabeth Lowrey—even growing up to design a new home for Draper, a not-for-profit engineering firm that created software for Apollo 11. “I remember, as we stepped into Draper’s lobby, the first thing we saw was a space shuttle model.  Even more thrilling was the opportunity to meet Margaret Hamilton, the pioneering software engineer who had made the moon landing possible!” A glass and steel structure forms the roof of the Draper atrium, which is rung with seven floors of offices and laboratories connected by blue glass vertical and horizontal stairways, green walls, and “the Cloud,” a polished steel polyhedron that is truly out of this world.

On the Water/Palisade Bay, New York City. Photography courtesy of ARO.

Adam Yarinsky, FAIA LEED AP, principal, Architecture Research Office

“I was seven, I remember watching the feed of the moonwalk,” says ARO co-founder Adam Yarinksy. “And if you were a kid that was into building models, you had the plastic model kit that was black and white with USA in red on the side. I built a model of the Saturn V and the lunar and command and service modules. The purposefulness of the vehicle had a kind of directness when you compare it to technology today. The control panels were just rows and rows of switches that all looked the same. There was a kind of Dieter Rams quality to it.” But it was politics, not aesthetics, that really inspired Yarinsky’s work with ARO, including this vision of the upper harbor of New York and New Jersey which proposes archipelago and wetlands to mitigate rising sea levels and storm surges. “The finite nature of the planet we’re on reinforces the notion that architecture is part of this web of relationships,” he says. “The best architecture tries to modify and transform, but it’s not an autonomous thing. It’s linked. That sense of connection is the legacy.”

Continue reading Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

When the Apollo 11 came to rest in the lunar Sea of Tranquility on July 20th, 1969 and began transmitting back to Earth grainy black-and-white images of a spider-legged ship, pale figures within shiny helmets, and, a bit later, magisterial photographs of Earth itself against the black void of space, the human race’s conception of itself changed forever. The voyage inspired political realignments and countless scientific breakthroughs; it also inspired the look and feel of a number of cultural masterpieces, from Brian Eno’s 1983 ambient classic Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1971 stark sci-fi epic Solaris.

Architecture and design took that giant leap for mankind along with Neil Armstrong. In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing, we spoke to innovators in the industry about their own lunar inspirations.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20
Perilune by Suzanne Tick for Luum Textiles. Photography courtesy of Luum Textiles.

Suzanne Tick, creative director, Luum Textiles

As a child, the textile designer Suzanne Tick watched the landing from her home in Bloomington, Illinois. “What was riveting to me was the sound of someone on the moon and his buoyancy,” Tick says. “I had this realization that a person can be on the moon while I’m sitting at home and he could also be floating!” Since then, the moon has been an important force in her life. “I’ve lived by the MoMA Moon Charts and they have played a large part in my consciousness. A poignant time in my life was 2009, 2010, and 2011 which coincided with the last three years of my father’s life, my marriage, and my son living with me. For this reason, I wove a triptych of each of these years and sewed them together as a reminder of that shift in my life.” This design became Perilune, a printed polyurethane which was introduced through Luum.

Long Dock Park in Beacon, New York by Gary R. Hilderbrand. Photography by James Ewing.

Gary R. Hilderbrand, FASLA FAAR; principal, Reed Hilderbrand; Peter Louis Hornbeck Professor in Practice, Harvard Graduate School of Design

“Because my Aunt and grandmother had a large color TV, anything momentous like this we watched in their living room,” says Gary Hilderbrand. “All gathered ‘round for the moon landing. It’s singed on my brain.” The landscape architect would go on to transform a brownfield in Beacon, New York, into a waterfront parkland with site-specific work by artist George Trakas and two buildings by ARO. “Apollo amplified my instincts about knowing our place in the world and a sense that we somehow had technological knowledge to improve it,” he says. “Seeing these missions orbiting around the other side of the moon, and then exploring its surface, gave me hope that we could right our own environmental mess and craft a smarter, saner landscape. That way of seeing the Earth descended directly from the Apollo 8 ‘earthrise’ photograph. Who would not be affected by that image?!”

SiriusXM’s New York Headquarters and Broadcast Center by Michael Kostow. Photography by Adrian Wilson.

Michael Kostow, founding principal, Kostow Greenwood Architects

Satellite radio wouldn’t exist without the technological breakthroughs of the Apollo mission, so it made perfect sense to have a space fan design the headquarters for one of its largest players, SiriusXM. “I watched the moon landing as a youngster and even had early aspirations of becoming an astronaut,” says Michael Kostow. “I later wanted to design space vehicles for NASA, would build and fly multi-stage model rockets, and even as an architecture graduate student had an early morning ‘party’ to drink Tang and watch the first launch of the space station with my classmates.” The compact efficiency of the capsules influenced his plan for the satellite broadcasting company: “We wanted to invoke simplicity and timelessness,” he says, “and allow the empty space to be an active player in setting the mood.” Mission accomplished.

Aerial and Half-Moon by Kelly Harris Smith for Skyline Design. Photography courtesy of Skyline Design.

Kelly Harris Smith, designer and creative director, Kelly Harris Smith

“I’ve never been on a rocket ship,” says designer Kelly Harris Smith, “but I have flown on an airplane and to this day I always request a window seat so I can peek out over the landscape.” The designer was born after the moon landing but carries the legacy of an aerial point of view into a collection for Chicago’s Skyline Design of glass panels with systems of micro-patterns within shapes and gradations of color over larger repeats. “It’s rooted in looking at the familiar in a new way,” she says, “which I have to imagine is what all astronauts experience looking back at Earth.”

Draper, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Photography by Mark Flannery.

Elizabeth Lowrey, principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects

“Watching the moon landing, even at such a young age, I was awed by the realization that anything is possible,” says Elizabeth Lowrey—even growing up to design a new home for Draper, a not-for-profit engineering firm that created software for Apollo 11. “I remember, as we stepped into Draper’s lobby, the first thing we saw was a space shuttle model.  Even more thrilling was the opportunity to meet Margaret Hamilton, the pioneering software engineer who had made the moon landing possible!” A glass and steel structure forms the roof of the Draper atrium, which is rung with seven floors of offices and laboratories connected by blue glass vertical and horizontal stairways, green walls, and “the Cloud,” a polished steel polyhedron that is truly out of this world.

On the Water/Palisade Bay, New York City. Photography courtesy of ARO.

Adam Yarinsky, FAIA LEED AP, principal, Architecture Research Office

“I was seven, I remember watching the feed of the moonwalk,” says ARO co-founder Adam Yarinksy. “And if you were a kid that was into building models, you had the plastic model kit that was black and white with USA in red on the side. I built a model of the Saturn V and the lunar and command and service modules. The purposefulness of the vehicle had a kind of directness when you compare it to technology today. The control panels were just rows and rows of switches that all looked the same. There was a kind of Dieter Rams quality to it.” But it was politics, not aesthetics, that really inspired Yarinsky’s work with ARO, including this vision of the upper harbor of New York and New Jersey which proposes archipelago and wetlands to mitigate rising sea levels and storm surges. “The finite nature of the planet we’re on reinforces the notion that architecture is part of this web of relationships,” he says. “The best architecture tries to modify and transform, but it’s not an autonomous thing. It’s linked. That sense of connection is the legacy.”

Continue reading Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

Messana O’Rorke Goes Minimalist for Malin+Goetz’s Century City Shop

Flooring throughout is LV Wood Flooring’s European oak in a herringbone installation. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

For more than 20 years Messana O’Rorke has lent its bold minimalism to residences from coast to coast. There’s a good chance that over the decades many of those home owners have stocked their bathrooms and showers with products from Malin+Goetz, the go-to brand for high-design hygiene aficionados. Messana O’Rorke has even designed a few Malin+Goetz shops, including locations on New York’s Madison Avenue and Elizabeth Street, and outposts in Santa Monica and downtown LA.

Raised, backlit stainless-steel letters with LED lighting announce the entrance. Photography by Eric Laignel.

For their latest collaboration, a shop in Century City’s Westfield Mall, they wanted to go back to the beginning. “Our inspiration was the original store in Chelsea,” says co-founder and principal Brian Messana. “We wanted to create two distinct spaces in one, and specific areas for the product lines, which the Chelsea store successfully achieves.”

Read More: Peter Marino Channels Chanel with Showstopping Stores in Istanbul and Tokyo

An Arabescato marble island houses a sink by Kohler Co. with a Vola faucet. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

As does Century City, with a light and bright entrance area finished in diamond plaster and a rear area in wall-to-wall-to-ceiling fumed oak. Finishes of black granite and marble reference the brand’s black-and-white packaging, which surely will look just as fresh in another 20 years.

A dramatic expanse of absolute black granite forms a display in the back of the shop. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Acrylic shelves allow the products to float against the walls. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Near the back, walls and ceilings of fumed 12-inch wide European oak meet walls of polished and waxed diamond plaster. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Read More: Mykita’s New SoHo Flagship Blends Handcraft and High-Tech

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Lucy Harris Studio Invests in a Classic Look for a Financial Services Headquarters

The custom reception desk is honed Arabescato Ovulato marble, framed by slats of rift white oak veneer in an ebonized stain. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

 

When a financial services company needed new offices in Greenwich, Connecticut, its executives wanted the design to embody the firm’s focus on developing long-term client relationships. The headquarters’ ambience, they decided, should not only continue to look fresh as those relationships matured, but also include nods to hospitality to make clients in a jittery financial market feel comfortable. 

Roll & Hill’s Circle pendant hangs above a Knoll table and Bernhardt chairs in the conference room. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

Read more: Vocon Opts for Locally-Inspired Design at Its Cleveland Headquarters

“The architect, Dan Radman, had developed a layout that fostered a strong connection between reception and the board room and another conference room, which are client-centered spaces,” says Lucy Harris, principal of her eponymous design firm. Her team polished up the 10,850 square feet with investment pieces that include Charlotte Perriand sconces and concrete side tables by Francesco Balzano

The pantry area features Gubi stools and Apparatus pendants. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

Executive offices line the perimeter, with open workstations within, all in what Harris calls “a high-contrast palette of white walls, dark furniture, and architectural elements as it felt fresh, clean, and dramatic.” And just in case the pantry and conference rooms are full, private lounge areas are carved out by slatted walls next to reception. “They open up and connect spaces by giving views and light,” Harris says, two qualities any client might appreciate.

Read more: StudiosC Creates Positive/Negative Volumes for L&R Distributors in Brooklyn

A Living Divani sofa and Thomas Hontz Associates tables form the reception seating area, beneath a Serge Mouille chandelier from Studio Twenty Seven. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.
The pantry’s lounge area features Vitra chairs and a Knoll table. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

 

Read more: Kurz Architects designs a Skateboard-Friendly Office for SinnerSchrader

Continue reading Lucy Harris Studio Invests in a Classic Look for a Financial Services Headquarters

Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

From the Source stools gather at the custom horizontal walnut grain island, lit by Foscarini pendants. Photography by Cheng Lin.

 

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal.

This 2,350-square-foot apartment jettisons the piles of hallways and instead utilizes a gallery to connect public areas to the three bedrooms. Ample natural light floods the expansive open plan. And everywhere founder Idan Naor turned the usual orientation of things on its head. “The flower nook in the guest bathroom is leftover space from a vertical mechanical chase and allows for much-needed counter space,” he notes. Subway tiles are installed in herringbone patterns. “We flipped the grain direction in the kitchen millwork to amplify the composition,” he says. “And even the Sub-Zero fridge doors are flipped from the typical orientation to better accommodate traffic flow in the kitchen.” It’s a cool idea.

An AllModern floor lamp further brightens the sun-drenched master bedroom, with a Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams chair. Photography by Cheng Lin.
In the master bath, a custom teak and limestone vanity supports a Duravit sink and Watermark faucet; behind the MTI soaker bathtub is a wall of Stone Source’s chiseled limestone. Photography by Cheng Lin.
AllModern’s table lamps rest on vintage side tables in the second bedroom. Photography by Cheng Lin.
A rug from Safavieh defines the third bedroom. Photography by Cheng Lin.
Subway and penny tiles from Lazer Marble clad a second full bathroom, with a Toto toilet. Photography by Cheng Lin.
A Louis Poulsen Snowball pendant hangs above a vintage dining table, above herringbone floors of rift and quartered white oak. Photography by Cheng Lin.
Vintage Barcelona chairs boast custom refurbished cushions in the living area, around a vintage Paolo Piva coffee table and DWR sofa. Photography by Cheng Lin.

Continue reading Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

Kokaistudios Builds a City for Assemble by Réel’s Shanghai Concept Store

PROJECT NAME Assemble by Réel
LOCATION Shanghai
FIRM Kokaistudios
SQ. FT. 11,000 SQF

The Italian architects Filippo Gabbiani and Andrea Destefanis have been based in Shanghai since 2002, while working all around the world. So, when the concept store Assemble by Réel wanted to open a men’s shop that paid tribute to the booming Chinese municipality while showing a global outlook, executives called upon the pair’s Kokaistudios.

A triangle of green Diatom mud directs shoppers toward the entrance. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.

They organized the 11,000-square-foot space, located on the third floor of a high-end shopping mall, into what Kokaistudios’ founder and principal architect Destefanis calls “a style journey based on recognizable architectural city motifs.” A Church area greets customers with arches and a colonnade, through which they reach the Park, with a curtain wall and window seats to view nearby Jing’an Park. A Skate Park includes an ersatz ramp, while the final Gallery area is an artful white-on-white space delineated by translucent partitions.

Read more: Spacemen Creates Edgy Shanghai Store for Online Retailer By

Clothes are displayed within the entrance’s monumental glass ellipse. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.

“We wanted to capitalize on the grandness of the space and at the same time provide diverse experiences,” says interior design director Ian Yu. “By utilizing compression and dilation of space, the customers move through the store with curiosity and surprise.” And then get some selfies and shopping done, too.

The arch walls are a Travertino plaster surface trimmed in oak. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.
The team devised displays in sandstone, terrazzo, and stainless steel for the park-inspired lounge area. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.
A divider inspired by skate park ramps forms a backdrop for tables of white ceramic tile with green grout and polished stainless steel. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.
Pedestals and tables throughout the store are perforated stainless steel, powder coated white. Photography by Dirk Weiblen, courtesy of Kokaistudios.

Read more: 5 Retail Wonderlands Subvert Reality

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Mickaël Gouret Goes Classic for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding Shop in Paris

Full-size mirrors in the back multiply the rows of arches in Gouret’s design for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

 

For the La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding shop, just moments from Left Bank Paris landmarks such as Café de Flore, there was no point competing with the glamour of Boulevard Saint-Germain. Instead, architect and designer Mickaël Gouret (@mickael_gouret) transformed a slightly dowdy shop into a 1,700-square-foot grand promenade.

Gouret tucked lighting between the exposed ceiling beams of the second floor’s mattress showroom. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

 

“I wanted something from the classical image people have of Paris,” Gouret says. “So, the arches are perfectly aligned to the new main entrance of the shop. The central part of the shop is then given over to a bed. And the landscape hierarchy is very low so that the bed is always visible from the outside, but also from the other side of the street.”

Read More: Kokaistudios Builds a City for Assemble by Réel’s Shanghai Concept Store

A sea-blue rug by Ege offers drama, ramped up by a vivid red rug by Prevotat that runs up the curved staircase of the same color to a second-floor expanse of mattress options. A few of Roger Tallon’s Cryptogamme stools dot the sales floor, the ideal spot to rest and dream up plans for the future.

A bold red staircase unites the two floors of La Chambre by Royal Hermitage in Paris’s Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.
Niches backed in blue display merchandise above storage boxes made of marble. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.
The interiors of the arches are covered in Nobilis’s unwoven satin wallpaper. Photography by Nicolas Matéus.

Read More: Cass Calder Smith Designs Sarah Jessica Parker’s Second Shoe Store in NYC

Continue reading Mickaël Gouret Goes Classic for La Chambre by Royal Hermitage Bedding Shop in Paris

Ministry of Design Creates User Experiences at Durasport Flagship in Singapore

Between the Climb zone’s circular display cages is Singapore’s first “Freedom Climber,” a non-motorized climbing wall with a rotating surface upon which customers can test shoes. Photography by CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks.

 

“How do we make a physical store relevant?”

That’s what the team at Ministry of Design asked themselves, says founder and director Colin Seah, when they got the chance to design a Durasport sporting goods flagship in a new mall in Safdie Architect’s Jewel Changi Airport in Singapore. Their answer? Make the space an experience, make furnishings as high-performance as the products themselves, and—like any good athlete—ensure flexibility.

Read more: Spacemen Creates Edgy Shanghai Store for Online Retailer By

LED tube lights by Unitrio Trading form an “X” logo across the entrance’s stainless-steel gates, featuring a hairline finish, by Sin Leong Ann Metal Supplies. Photography CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks. 

 

The result is as much an R&D lab as a shop, with 2,000 square feet divided into four zones of activities incorporating state-of-the-art products (co-curated by Ministry of Design) and futuristic displays that include virtual fitting rooms, foot-powered climbing walls, and bicycles ready for a test-pedal. 

A dynamic display at the entrance sets a mannequin within a ring of steel and LED tubes. Photography by CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks. 

 

“The custom display system required lots of design and prototyping,” Seah says, “but it enables a wide range of products which are different in shape, size, and display requirements. Also, each time Durasport brings in new products, they are able to ‘clip in and clip out’ to configure a new shelving display.” All that, plus new visual identities such as mylar shopping bags, silver foil name cards, and acrylic display tags create a true exercise in retail relevancy.

 Keep scrolling for additional project images >

The Cycling zone includes bikes, helmets, and shoes displayed within a faceted corner of stainless steel. Photography by CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks.
Custom acrylic LED signage announces the Arctic zone, featuring a “Magic Mirror” that allows customers to photograph themselves in simulations of the skiwear. Photography by CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks.
In the Trizone area, as throughout the Durasport store, ceilings are painted in Nippon Paint‘s Stiletto Grey and floors are Unitrio Trading’s Artigo high-performance anti-slip rubber. Photography by CI&A Photography/Edward Hendricks.

Read more: Hyperiôn Light Year by Karv One Design Wins 2019 IIDA Award

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Musen Design Lets the Light into a Taiwanese Hair Salon

Custom wine racks serve as a screen near reception, bordering a bar area with custom pendants and stools. Photography by Hey!cheese.

 

Musen Design has made a name for itself throughout Taiwan for its artful residential interiors. The firm’s signature minimalism recently transformed a former restaurant in a rundown building into vibrant new location for Turning Around, the salon of a well-known stylist in Tainan.

The 1,000-square-foot space, with an addition 300-square-foot exterior space, utilizes the original arched, load-bearing wall to form separate salon and social spaces that retain illumination from vast windows overlooking a neighboring park. “Because of the surface lighting and reflections from the custom mirrors, the pure, white theme, which met the proprietor’s demands and also suits the brand, brims with life,” says design director Eric Cho.

A custom mirror hangs over the bathroom’s custom vanity, with refurbished windows overlooking the park. Photography by Hey!cheese.

 

Small details add interest, such as a small forest of potted plants arranged throughout and metallic wallpaper applied to the interiors of the arched passageways between spaces. “We applied gold lacquer in some details,” Cho says, with a nod to the previous incarnation of the space, “which lets the shop’s customers enjoy a visual feast along with their salon service.”

Views of a nearby park reflect on the main salon’s flooring, which alternates between polished concrete and epoxy. Photography by Hey!cheese.
The custom reception desk is marbleized melamine veneer. Photography by Hey!cheese.
Turning Around salon is located in a space in Tainan formerly occupied by a restaurant. Photography by Hey!cheese.

 

Read more: Tokyo Salon by Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Evokes Braids and Twists

Continue reading Musen Design Lets the Light into a Taiwanese Hair Salon

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