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Tag Archives: Interior

Old Cement Factory Turned Into Home May Look Great From Outside, But The Interior Is Even Better

Architect Ricardo Bofill found this cement factory in 1973 and quickly realized its possibilities. It took him nearly 45 years to transform it into his home, but the end result looks breathtaking both from the outside and from the inside.

Shortly after purchasing the complex, Ricardo’s team began working on it. “Keeping our eyes moving like a kaleidoscope,” Ricardo says “We already imagined future spaces and found out that the different visual and aesthetics trends that had developed since World War I coexisted here:
1) Surrealism in paradoxical stairs that lead to nowhere; the absurdity of certain elements hanging over voids; huge but useless spaces of weird proportions, but magical because of their tension and disproportion;
2) Abstraction in the pure volumes, which revealed themselves at times broken and raw;
3)Brutalism in the abrupt treatment and sculptural qualities of the materials.”

La fábrica proves that form and function have to be dissociated; in this case, the function did not create the form. Instead, it has been shown that any space can be allocated whatever use the architect chooses (if he’s skillful enough)! Bofill currently lives and works here: “Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure.”

More info: ricardobofill.com (h/t)

In 1973, Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill purchased a WWI-era cement factory near Barcelona

He immediately began renovating it into his home

After years of partial deconstruction, his team started to furnish the interior as a modern living space

The exterior was fitted with vegetation, and now overflows with lush greenery

The structure has been completely transformed into a breathtaking and unique home

“The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence” Bofill says

Every room is designed with its own special purpose, and no two look quite alike

“I have the impression of living <…> in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life”

“Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure”

A variety of indoor and outdoor relaxation spots can be found throughout the entire property

Workspace is also a crucial component here because Bofill’s team uses part of La fábrica as a studio

The exterior is mostly covered by grass, but eucalyptus, palm, and olive trees also grow there

This gives the building a “mysterious aspect of romantic ruin that makes it unique and unrepeatable”

“The kitchen-dining room located in the ground floor is the meeting point for the family”

Despite its stunning transformation, the factory is a work in progress to this day

The project is constantly evolving, fitting Bufill’s lifestyle and creative visions

La fábrica will always have some work to be done, and that is part of its symbolic charm

With enough creative thinking, any building can become something new and beautiful

Rokas Laurinavičius

I want to tell you a story.

Continue reading Old Cement Factory Turned Into Home May Look Great From Outside, But The Interior Is Even Better

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Someone Is Selling A Gigantic Cave Home For $2.5 Million And Its Interior Is Even More Amazing Than The Exterior

Do you know any Bond villains that are looking for a new home? The Beckham Creek Cave Lodge located in Arkansas might be the perfect place for them.

The 6,000 sq. ft. lodge started as a bomb shelter but was repurposed into a luxury hotel in the 80’s. It is carved inside a giant rock, has it’s own waterfall and helipad, and one night’s stay costs $1200. And if you think it looks like your dream home (or dream villain lair), you’re in luck – the owner is currently selling it! But keep in mind – the starting bid is a whopping $2.5 million.

Check out the amazing lodge, nicknamed the ‘World’s most luxurious cave’ in the gallery below!

More info: Instagram | Website | h/t

The cave in which the lodge is built was used for exploration since the early 1800s, and was only repurposed in 1983

The cave along with a 240-acre spread was purchased by Celestial Tea co-founder John Hay for $146,000

Hay believed the cave could be an amazing hideout in case things heated up during the Cold War

Four years and $2 million later, he had converted the cave into a bomb shelter

In 1988, an article in People’s magazine stated: “First, 20 laborers removed 250 million years worth of silt from the subterranean chamber”

“The cave’s mouth was then covered with three-foot-thick concrete walls and faced with quarried stone”

“Openings were left for windows for the oak-paneled kitchen and living room and for an arched, walnut-framed entrance way”

“In the event of the Holocaust, all these openings can be sealed with concrete blocks”

“Inside, Hay followed the cave’s natural, high-roofed contours “The architect was God,” he said”. The cave even has a natural waterfall inside

After the end of Cold War, Hay no longer needed the shelter and sold it

The current owner of “World’s most luxurious cave” has listed the property for sale again

And now it can be yours for a whopping $2.75 million

This gigantic cave home has four bedrooms and four bathrooms

It has everything a modern home needs, including a 75-inch LED TV in the living room

Thermal heating will keep you warm and cozy in the living area

It also features a state-of-the-art kitchen with a large custom-built wooden bar for guests to come and gather around

All rooms feature natural rock formations since most of the cave was preserved during all phases of building and remodeling

The master bedroom includes a unique round queen-sized bed and a spa-like private bathroom, all surrounded by the natural formations of the cave


Rock walls and overhead rain showers provide a waterfall-like experience when showering


All 4 bedrooms are unique and offer queen-sized beds, exposed cavern walls, and lavish bathrooms




When outside, you can grill up a steak in a stone fireplace while watching the amazing view from the front deck

The cave even has it’s own helipad in case you need a place to park your chopper!

Continue reading Someone Is Selling A Gigantic Cave Home For $2.5 Million And Its Interior Is Even More Amazing Than The Exterior

Designers Bring The Interior Of Famous Paintings To Life

Paintings of historical interiors are always fascinating as they are a glimpse of the stylistic conventions from past eras. They give us an insight into a past life, decorating trends of the time, people’s lifestyles and, of course, the state of mind of the artist who created them. They give us a wonderful opportunity to discover the past!

With this in mind, we wouldn’t lie saying that such paintings as Vincent van Gogh’s ‘The Bedroom’, Grant Wood’s ‘The Sun Shine on the Corner’, Wassily Kandinsky’s ‘Interior (My Dining Room)’ and many more, are historical records. UK-based creative agency NeoMam decided to revive these famous paintings and for their client Home Advisor create paintery interiors as if they were real-life rooms of the modern world.

Continue reading Designers Bring The Interior Of Famous Paintings To Life

Rottet Studio Makes Design the Star at the Los Angeles Office of Paradigm

PROJECT NAME Paradigm
LOCATION Los Angeles
FIRM Rottet Studio
SQ. FT. 82,000 SQF

“Light and movement.” That’s what Sam Gores said he wanted to see upon entering his office in Los Angeles. And when the chairman and CEO of Paradigm Talent Agencyasks for something, that is precisely what he gets—particularly when the project is designed by Rottet Studio. Interior Design Hall of Fame member Lauren Rottet’s firm is itself a fixture in the entertainment business, with credits including offices for United Talent Agency and Viacom.

A custom reception desk in folded and welded mirror-polished stainless-steel stands on engineered European white-oak floor planks at Rottet Studio’s Los Angeles office for Paradigm Talent Agency. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

A powerhouse with eight locations across the U.S. as well as in Toronto and London, Paradigm “understood that architecture does matter,” Rottet Studio founding principal Richard Riveire begins. “They really get that an agency can leapfrog over competitors by bringing everyone under one roof, giving them a great place to work, and making sure that conversations and impromptu meetings happen.” So, employees from the music, literary, film, and TV divisions, previously at three separate L.A. sites, are now together in Beverly Hills.

Milo Baughman–inspired chairs face a leather-covered sofa in the green room. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Notable for a landmark fountain, a monumental pyramid, standing in the front courtyard, the 1980s building had a storied past as the former home of the agency ICM Partners but had been vacant for seven years. Though Riveire and principal Harout Dedeyan term their intervention there “tenant improvement,” that’s just Rottet Studio’s typically understated manner. We call the project a complete gut job, with only the limestone and granite wall cladding and the skylight retained. The 82,000-square-foot U-shape interior was entirely rebuilt. Plus, the courtyard, which previously “leaked like a sieve,” Riveire says, was repaved and replanted around the pyramid.

Rising from reception’s sitting area, stairs offer additional seating on vinyl-covered cushions. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The greatest challenge was “to figure out new ways of working inside a 30-year-old building,” Riveire continues. “By jamming things together, we could create an exciting design that changes all the time.” The device that “moved the throttle setting toward more common spaces,” he explains, was the insertion of a central stair atrium—obviously the big move. “We had to whack out 1,000 square feet on two of the floors.” 

A Greg Bogin artwork was commissioned for a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

No mere grand staircase, this. It’s not only the people connector between the three levels but also a multitasker. The lower, wider flight can serve as a vertical space for solo work, thanks to the  blocky cushions scattered across the steps, or as a venue for all-hands company meetings, when combined with the reception area and an adjacent conference room.

On three, the reception area features an armless chair by Karim Rashid. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Flights aren’t stacked but slightly rotated inside circular openings that differ in size—difficult to engineer, to say the least. “LED halos accentuate the perimeters,” Dedeyan says. The ensemble presents quite a climb, especially for those with vertigo. A mirrored ceiling produces a dizzying kaleidoscope effect, making the height appear as six stories, not three.

The courtyard’s new granite, concrete, and turf surfaces surround an existing Eric Orr pyramid fountain. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Sharing dramatic creds is the reception desk. Riveire, who’s highly knowledgeable about hospitality projects, too, compares it to “the front desk of a hotel.” He goes on to liken the long, purposely low form in mirror-polished stainless steel to “a squished pickle.” We see inspirations of sculptures by Anish Kapoor. Regardless, it’s an Instagram moment.

Erik Parker’s acrylic collage on canvas punctuates a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Speaking of art, there’s no shortage of spectacular pieces, some of them commissioned. Initiated by Gores, the program was assembled by a DJ-curator, DB Burkeman, in collaboration with a more conventional art consultant. Standouts include the atrium’s colorful text-based screen prints, kinetic black-and-white photographs of figures in the elevator lobbies, and a corridor’s collage inspired by comic books, hip-hop, and graffiti.

Nylon carpet in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Surprisingly, knowing Rottet Studio as we do, furnishings are generally not custom. Widely available residential pieces, they could be found in many a stylish living room. Flooring, consistent with that vibe, is white-oak planks in common spaces. “The wood is a contrast to all that stone on the walls,” Riveire explains.

The listening room is acoustically isolated. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Carpeted work spaces follow the customary setup. Glass-fronted private offices for agents face assistants at a benching system. Most offices have sit-stand desks. (Many in the stand position during our visit.) Sprinkled among the offices are casual lounges, up for grabs as needed. What’s unusual is the lack of hierarchy among divisions. No single one ranks above any other.

The stair atrium’s mirror-finished stretched mem­brane ceiling reflects a series of 21 screen prints by Eve Fowler. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Conference and meeting rooms and the “signing rooms” encircle the stair atrium. Really, though, everything is an ad hoc meeting space, including  elevator lobbies fitted out with chic and super-comfy seating. There are also pantries and coffee bars aplenty, the best, no doubt, being the ground level’s coffee lounge opening onto the courtyard. Pull up a stool to the marble counter, or plop down on a sofa or armchairs anchored by a houndstooth rug that blends with the same pattern rendered in floor tile.

Reception’s custom wool-silk rug. Photography by Eric Laignel.

The list of amenities goes on: a screening room with adjacent green room, another room filled with candy. According to Paradigm director of special services and guest relations Rozzana Ramos, clients come just to hang out. Linger long enough, and you might spot Antonio Banderas or Henry Golding reading a script or Chris Martin, Ed Sheeren, or Sia headed to the listening room where, Riveire says, they can “crank it up to 11.” 

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

LED halos ringing the stair atrium. Photography by Eric Laignel.
A corridor’s con­struction of album covers with wood and resin by David Ellis. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lounge on two. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Patricia Urquiola chairs appear in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Damien Hirst’s deck for Supreme is mounted with other skateboards in an office area. Photography by Eric Laignel.
In the coffee lounge, a focal wall includes artwork by Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Laser-printed photographs by Kenton Parker energize an elevator lobby. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lacquered logo wall on a granite base. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Project Team: Chris Jones; Theresa Lee; Pegah Koulaeian, Laurence Cartledge: Rottet Studio. Esquared Lighting: Lighting Consultant. Newson Brown Acoustics: Acoustical Consultant. Cybola Systems Corporation: Audio-Visual Consultant. Lendrum Fine Art: Art Consultant. Thornton Tomasetti: Structural Engineer. Arc Engineering: MEP. AMA Project Management: Project Manager. Clune Con­struc­tion Company: General Contractor.

Product Sources: From Front: AM Cabinets: Custom Desk (Recep­tion). Palecek: Coffee Table (Green Room). RH: Chairs, Sofa (Green Room), Sofa (Listening Room). CB2: Console (Green Room), Side Tables (Hall), Sofa, Coffee Table (Lounge), Table (Office), Dining Chairs (Coffee Lounge). Tai Ping Carpets: Custom Rug (Sitting Area). Davis Furniture: Sofas. Holly Hunt: Chairs. West Elm: Side Tables (Lounge, Coffee Lounge, Reception Area). Martin Brattrud: Cushions (Stairway). Blu Dot: Benches (Hall), Stools (Atrium), Credenza (Listening Room), Sofa (Reception Area). Summer Classics: Chairs (Court­Yard). Andreu World: Chairs (Office). Alur: Storefront Sys­tem. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams: Coffee Table (Coffee Lounge). Gus Modern: Sofa. Shaw Hospitality: Rug. Andreu World: Barstools. Thomas O’Brien: Pendant Fixture. Zuo Modern: Chairs (Coffee Lounge), Chairs, Table (Listening Room). Tandus: Rug (Reception Area). Nienkamper: Chair. H.D. Buttercup: Armchairs. West Elm: White Side Table. Bernhardt Design: Bench. Throughout: Monarch Plank: Floor Planks. Bentley: Carpet. Barrisol: Stretched Ceiling Membrane. Benjamin Moore & Co.; Dunn-Edwards Corporation: Paint.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Inside Out Series: Preparation For My Art Exhibit

Hello all! I am excited to write about my preparation for the Inside Out Series paintings exhibit. As I am getting closer to getting ready for the show, I am wrapping up a few unfinished tasks. All the labels are printed for each painting as well as a brief description  of what the series are about! All the artwork have the wire on the back of them for the ease of hanging and displaying the work. I am so happy to be working with such an amazing cafe/gallery, Soho, and would highly suggest all artists to consider having a show there! Beverages will be available for purchase as well as light snacks such as chocolate, cheese, etc….

There will be raffle tickets for a prize drawing for all the attendants. I have also created magnetic art that you could easily display on your fridge! Each piece has my name, website, and email address on it, in case you need to get a hold of me for art lessons, commissioned art, etc…. (See the image below). They are done with watercolor pencils and the brand name is Windsor & Newton! Water color pencils are an easy medium of using watercolors. It is highly controllable and the direction the paint goes is all in your hands!

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Besides the “Inside Out” series art, I will have another set of paintings that I have recently worked on with dry pastels! In My opinion they are very pleasing and eye catching. There are 9 of them that are 12″ X 12″ each. (See below for the sample picture)!

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If you would like to know a little bit about what my series are about, read the information below:

“You know the idea of using plants and flowers in a room, bringing the outside in? For years, this concept has been very popular in designing an interior space that would make the occupants feel like they are experiencing being in nature simultaneously. This idea is still in practice and provides for great human experiences.

For the past couple of years, I have been analyzing this concept in a deeper sense of not only the interior space but also looking at the exterior and the correlation between the landscape, outer building structure (architecture), and the inner building structure (the interior). I started looking at some of the popular name architects and their works, seeing at least one common ground. All these famous sites connect the landscape with its architecture and interior design. If the inside space is designed a certain way, it somehow balances with the architecture style or some elements of the landscape design.

“The Landscape. The Exterior. The Interior.” These three areas made me think of the Venn Diagram. If “A” is the landscape and “B” the interior, then “C” includes commonalities of both A & B. In other words, area “C” brings areas “A” & “B” together.

Venn-Diagram

The conclusion I came up with is that all the parts and pieces of an area where a building lands on need to be balanced and have harmony as a whole and no single part stands alone by itself.”

Here is the invite for the event that includes the date, time, as well as the location of my event! Hope to see you all there!

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