Tag Archives: Hong Kong

Besides Being A Pilot, This Man Also Takes Stunning Photos Of Places He Visits Around The World (105 Pics)

If you are sick of lockdown in your house and being forcefully turned into a couch potato, this British pilot, currently based in Hong Kong, will take you on a trip around the world. And although following his father’s footsteps, Lee Mumford indeed knows how to fly a plane and he also can show you the jewels of the planet in an easier, corona-free, and much cheaper way. While working as an airline pilot, he has visited over 40 countries and has seen some of the most magical and picturesque places on Earth. It would be a shame not to share them with others, so he combined his love of flying and photography to provide us with breathtaking photos that range from beautiful landscapes to vivid cityscapes.

Continue reading Besides Being A Pilot, This Man Also Takes Stunning Photos Of Places He Visits Around The World (105 Pics)

40 Genius Design Examples That Will Leave You Amazed

It takes skill and ingenuity to create a design that not only works flawlessly but also looks aesthetically pleasing. It’s designs like these that give us that satisfying feeling similar to looking at a beautiful painting, photograph, or other piece of art. Some Reddit users have even created a whole community dedicated to examples of satisfying design, and I’m pretty sure that the ingenuity of some of these talented designers will leave you in awe.

From newspaper ads, billboards, and even coins – check out some excellent examples of genius design in the gallery below! And if you want something from the opposite end of the design spectrum, check out our earlier post here!

More info: Reddit

#1 Each Picture Is Made Of As Many Pixels As That Of The Endangered Species Population- Designed By Yoshiyuki Mikami

Image source: World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

#2 “Safety Glasses” That I Made For My Wife’s Optometry Office

Image source: alanbrendan

#3 This Ad

Image source: Evershine_1564

#4 This Condom Ad

Image source: afg500

#5 A Bench In The Library Of Alexandria

Image source: squid50s

#6 Highlight The Remarkable

Image source: Spanholz

#7 Found In Twitter

Image source: IIphilipII

#8 Very Direct Ads From The City Of Toronto Against Littering

Image source:  Live Green Toronto

#9 Poster For Better Shark Culling Laws

Image source: Shark Culling Laws

#10 Really Great Minimalist Billboard Ad

Image source: ibmwatsonson

#11 I Really Like The Privacy

Image source: FourAM-Throwaway

#12 A Satisfying Use Of Space

Image source: imgur.com

#13 If You Put All The Mexican Coins Together They Turn Into The Aztec Calendar

Image source: Roxxo5500

#14 Saw This On Facebook, By Invisible York

Image source: juddzilla69

#15 All The Hooks And Shelves You Need!

Image source: 5_Frog_Margin

#16 A Clever Way To Show What Ancient Ruins Looked Like

Image source: terchon

#17 Eraser That Turns Into A Tiny Mount Fuji After Some Time Of Use

Image source: MarshallTan

#18 The New National Geographic Cover

Image source: Crazylyric

#19 This “Seatbelts Save Lives” Campaign

Image source: harschil

#20 Elevator Kick Buttons

Image source: rastroboy

#21 The Spines Of These History Books

Image source: DIA13OLICAL

#22 I Thought This Volkswagen Ad Belongs To Here

Image source: bringeroftherain

#23 Ignoring The Politics, This Anti-Gun Pro-Adoption Poster Design

Image source: Bless-You

#24 Studio Ghibli Designed This Dvd Case So It Looks Like The Characters Are Checking Their Reflection In The Water

Image source: FrostedCrow_FC

#25 Vietnam’s Daring Golden Bridge

Image source: conorthearchitect

#26 Time Magazine Covers From 2017, Early 2018, And This Week

Image source: moby323

#27 Surfrider Foundation Sushi Ad

Image source: Palaceboy100

#28 This Shop Has A Option To Shop Alone Or With Assistance

Image source: TheMinimob

#29 Daring Add By A Company That Sells Hats

Image source: fake_guccii

#30 Floor Tiles At The Us Postal Museum

Image source: ligbag4

#31 I Found This Bird Table Quite Charming

Image source: ViddyDoodah

#32 A Campaign Ad For Universal Design In Hong Kong

Image source: DubeDuba

#33 This Japanese Restaurant Logo Is Simultaneously A Japanese Crane And A Hand Holding Chopsticks

Image source: all-night

#34 Perfect

Image source: ajlion_10

#35 These Measuring Cups Are Designed To Visually Represent Fractions For Intuitive Use

Image source: blaizzze

#36 Literally The Logo Of The Year

Image source: imgur.com

#37 This Alzheimers Awareness Ad

Image source: hiimcoleman

#38 Space Exploration Monument In Moscow. 100m Tall

Image source: bakedmarx

#39 Milk Box Design Of Vera Zvereva

Image source: peguipa

#40 This Durex Add

Image source: Leviathan_XX429 shares

Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

Got wisdom to pour?

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Artist Uses Her Sink As A Canvas And Lets The Water Destroy Her Paintings 24 Hours Later (26 Pics)

During quarantine, a lot of professionals were left without a job or something to do. Many of them decided to use their skills and talent in something else so that they wouldn’t lose their touch. But what if you run out of supplies and can’t go to a shop for more?

Creative director Marta Grossi is an Italian painter who lives in Milan and has worked with a lot of famous companies like Vogue, Disney, and many others. She decided she would use those hard-acquired drawing skills on an unusual canvas—her sink.

Stuck in Italy and unable to see her family, she wanted to keep herself busy and sane during these hard times of self-isolation. Which is why she started a creative project.

More info: martagrossi.com | Instagram | behance.net | linkedin.com | pinterest.com

This post may include affiliate links.

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

She named the project “Wash Your Hands and Keep Creative.” Marta painted flowers, waves, animals, and many other things on the porcelain surface, which was perfect for a reusable canvas. Colorful and happy images paired with practicing her skills made for a good way to spend those long days in quarantine. The beautiful images gave her hope and helped her find beauty in unexpected places.

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

She painted a picture almost every day and after 24 hours, she let the water wash it down. She filmed some of the art washing away and it’s quite satisfying to watch.

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

About Marta Grossi from her website: “Multidisciplinary Italian creative director and artist, Marta Grossi, mixes illustrations, digital art, and hand techniques, creating bold works distinctly her own. After graduating from the International Graphic School of Venice, Marta has spent the past 15 years throughout Europe and Asia lending her art direction talents to brands including Ferrari, Lane Crawford, Agnès B, ArtAsiaPacific Magazine, Stuart Weitzman, Max Mara Group, Johnnie Walker, and more. Marta is also the creator of The Banana Graffiti project.

Currently based between Italy and Hong Kong—while developing brand imagery for large name companies—Marta is cultivating her interest in fine arts, communication, and storytelling. Marta continues to show her works in various exhibitions worldwide. Her works have been published in Vogue, Disney, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Yahoo Style, Designboom, Scmp, Societè Perrier, and Adobe, just to name a few.”

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

What do you think of these paintings? Maybe you can try and use your sink as a canvas and see what you come up with? After all, if you don’t like it, you can just wash it away.

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Image credits: bananagraffiti

Anyone can write on Bored Panda.Start writing!

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!Share on Facebook62 FollowHidrėlėyAuthor, Pro member

Fascinated by music, movies and sitcoms, I’m passionate about social media and can’t live without the internet, especially for all the cute dog and cat pictures out there. I wish the day had about 40 hours to be able to do everything I want. Read more »

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For This International Women’s Day, I Got 12 Men To Crush Stereotypes Of Masculinity With My Photoshoot

I am an artist from Lithuania, and together with my friend, we invited twelve men of diverse ages, social classes, and sexual orientations to be photographed nude with beautiful floral arrangements to celebrate International Women’s Day. The project aims to highlight the vulnerability of men and stereotypes associated with masculinity that are harmful not just to men, but women, too.

On March 8, it is often said that women are like flowers—beautiful, gentle, and delicate. We hope that this year, men can also bloom—open up and reveal their vulnerabilities, showing that they are not afraid to be fragile and sensual. Men suffer disproportionately from psychological problems because society teaches them to be emotionless, solve everything by themselves, not ask for help, and just keep silent. We chose this “feminine” day for the project because we wanted to go deeper and talk about something important for the wellbeing of men and society as a whole. After all, it’s essential to have good and healthy men in our lives.

In our society, men are told they must be the provider of the family and exhibit strong, stoic qualities. While these are not bad qualities on their own, the pressure to always be perfect and never falter is harmful to the male psyche. “Manly” professions are more dangerous and high-risk not just physically, but psychologically as well. Men are also more likely to be victims of violent crime. That is why it’s so essential to create a safe space for open dialogue and allow men to show their vulnerability—that they are searching and don’t always know everything.

Twelve bright and vivid photos show everyday heroes as well as celebrities like four-time “World’s Strongest Man” Žydrūnas Savickas and Paralympic rower Augustas Navickas. Each picture is accompanied by answers to three questions that help us see a side of them that is often invisible. Men describe their relationships with their fathers and their attitudes towards their bodies, recount the last time they cried, and why.

“These twelve interviews strengthened my belief in the transformational power of open discussions and listening. These men were very grateful for the conversations that inspired them to consider some important questions about themselves that their daily routines often prevented them from considering. Even a few wives expressed their support and gratitude because they felt their husbands changed. They became more open, and their family relationships improved. That is why I already feel in my heart that this project has made a big difference,” notes artist Neringa Rekašiūtė.

“In this age of women, it is important not to leave men behind. Our whole society must grow—not just parts of it. In countries where gender equality is more prominent, male suicide rates are lower—everybody benefits. From whatever angle you look at it, our similarities are greater than our differences. I could see men’s eyes light up during the shoot and I can tell you that we all just want to be seen,” adds Edita Mažutavičiūtė, the co-author of the project.

Augustas, Paralympian, 29

When was the last time you cried?

I was training in Italy a few years back—I was rowing in the open sea with the seatbelt holding me attached to the boat. The waves turned the boat over and I ended up under it. I couldn’t reach the surface—I panicked terribly. Finally, I realized that I needed to unfasten my seatbelt and swim out. That moment when I got the first breath of air… I can’t describe it. This was the most terrifying incident of my life, even more so than my spine injury. This year, before the world championship, my Belorussian friend flipped over and drowned. His wife was left alone with the kids. It was a difficult period, mainly fully understanding what he went through since I experienced it myself. Then, in November, in Hong Kong, we swam into the open sea. At first, it was calm—we were rowing alongside the harbor. Then we made a turn and two-meter waves started crashing at us. I was in unknown territory, a new boat, and I kept asking myself “what am I doing here?” It was horrifying, and the previous experience of drowning kind of magnified the fear. My eyes were full of tears when we finished the distance. Now, whenever there are waves, my concern is back. I have to face it every single time.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

We’re close. We got closer after my injury—at that time, I was spending a lot of time in rehab in Palanga, and he lives in Klaipėda, so we used to meet all the time. He helped me so much. He’s still very supportive—he comes to cheer for us whenever he can make it. My values changed after the spine injury—I used to be very irresponsible, making a lot of money and spending it all. I’ll be 30 soon, but sometimes I feel older than my 50-year-old dad.

What’s your relationship with your body?

It felt natural to undress for a nude photoshoot. And when I got the invitation, I thought that it’s a great and important topic. My body changed so much after the injury—I needed a lot of time to get used to seeing myself in a wheelchair. When I started dating my wife Ema, people used to stare at us while we were holding hands in public places. But we don’t care anymore. My wife was a huge help. She always tells me that she sees me, not the wheelchair.

Mindaugas, businessman, 41

When was the last time you cried?

I’m not made of wood, so I’m sensitive to a lot of stuff. I cry and I’m not ashamed of it. However, I don’t weep publicly, and I try not to do it in front of children. My daughter has certainly seen me crying, and that’s not a tragedy at all, but I still want to protect my kids from it. I cried a month ago—a few of my businesses went under and my health was terrible, so I was in a bad place. I’m coming back to life now.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My dad’s 86. He’s very old-fashioned, yet he’s undoubtedly a fantastic person—he knows how not to care about the little things and takes a light-hearted approach to life. Perhaps that’s exactly why he’s full of energy and vitality. Our experience was never easy; there was a lot of physical labor in the countryside. My brother keeps in touch with dad much more than I do, but my brother has a stronger connection to his ancestors and roots. He recently bought an apartment and then found a picture of our grandad standing in front of that very house. During the interwar period, it used to be a military school, and our grandad was a student there, hiding it from everybody—he had to in those days. Later, we understood why grandad always used to sing the Lithuanian anthem in privacy.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was a short, fat kid, always eating too many cutlets that my mom used to make. Then I kind of stretched out, turned into a lanky teenager, and started doing sports. My mom didn’t let me work out a lot due to my asthma. When I started my first family, I weighed 120 kilos and I used to drink so much alcohol back in those days. I decided to stay dry for two years. Yet my weight kept changing rapidly because of my emotional state. Now, I’m doing tai-chi. I do believe that our exterior reflects what’s happening inside. You don’t need to have a six-pack, that’s an extreme, but you simply must keep moving.

Zigmas, writer, 28

When was the last time you cried?

I appreciate my solitude, yet I can only imagine living and creating when communicating with the people around me. It’s communication that brings out the truth and provides a reality check about whoever you think you are. It’s easy to be good and good-looking for yourself, but it’s a whole other thing to meet people and have life “happen” to you. Life is worth the tears, not death. Death only finishes sentences and tells us what it was. “Now it’s this,” death says. It doesn’t mean no. That’s why we cry—because of interactions with others, through pain, hopelessness, disappointment, epiphanies, or moments of clarity. Hope can make us mistaken, and we’re bound to lie to ourselves or others when it eventually happens.
The last time I wept was around a week before writing these very words. I remembered that love couldn’t make people happy. It can inspire, give energy, make the days colorful; however, it just can’t make us happy. I can’t expect my love to change other people, to make them act in a way that I’d like them to.
My grandpa is now 95. During difficult moments, he used to tell us, “don’t cry; there’s no one to wipe your tears.” And it’s not like he thought it was indecent or inappropriate to sob; he just believed that crying requires a particular understanding and a touch from other people. Men often cried in his stories; I don’t even know when they stopped. Perhaps 50 years back.
It’s hard to face a man crying. It seems so terrifying and painful to the ones around. Inconsolable. Even insulting at times. Life-shattering. That’s probably why it’s so unneeded and undesired by many.
And most men would prefer not to cry—they’d like to remain heroes, immovable rocks. They’d like to be the ones to console others, to protect everyone, to spread joy, and accept responsibility. And that’s great, that’s beautiful. But that’s not a given.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My father was an alcoholic. And he almost took my life, too. He killed himself when I was a kid. I blamed myself for it for some time, and I was a bit happy as well when he was gone. Finally, I realized that I couldn’t justify all of my hardships and decisions using childhood traumas—I have to be responsible for who I am today and where I’m going. I can only be thankful for what happened in the past. Sometimes, when I feel misunderstood, when I’m unlucky, and the only solution seems to be to run away from everything and everyone when I’m disappointed in myself and the world, I do feel my father breathing over me. His northern, wolf-like breath reminds me that there’s still a lot of his anxiety, sadness, destruction, blood in me.
However, I don’t have to be a victim because of this. I’m not sure that we’re meant to learn from such mistakes and bad examples, or that a bad childhood is a useful experience. It wasn’t. But it taught me that growing up without a dad means doing everything yourself: fixing your first bike or car, painting walls, taking care of the roof, unclogging the chimney, or building a greenhouse. You also have to create relationships yourself, as well as rituals, habits, and your perception of others.
Overall, I think Lithuania lost its traditions of masculinity during the Soviet era. Before that, people used to respect their fathers so much more. It was almost a sacred relationship, but we looked at our dads during the Soviet years and saw nothing we could appreciate. That regime turned every man into a small bolt in a big machine, in a world where everything was given and decided, where no one could say a more powerful word, and where your spine and responsibility weren’t needed. Masculinity was suffocating; it mutated into a lukewarm bowl of nothing. Sure, there were exceptions, but this tendency forced us to reinvent the thing we used to call fatherhood, to show our kids what’s beautiful and admirable about it. This process is full of marvel and possibilities. Still, the biggest challenge is not to fall into hibernation, not to “go with the flow” of emotions and impulses, ignoring misunderstandings and everything else. We need to bring out the honesty and pride in this, gentleness and power, and build ourselves responsibly.

What’s your relationship with your body?

My body is like an instrument to me—it gets its value and beauty by how it’s used, what melodies I play with it. And yes, my body is an equal part of my personality, changing with the ways I live my life and with my thoughts. It expresses the things hidden within me through the wrinkles in my smile, the curvature of my back, through burns and calluses, and whatever else you might think of. It allows me to feel closeness and warmth, taste, smell, exhaustion, and many other things. Yet it’s great to keep reminding myself every day that I’m more than just a body. In general, male nudity looks so direct and straightforward to me, no mysteries at all, no excitement or secrets. It seems more insolent than tempting—material, routine, clear. I don’t believe that being nude is an expression of freedom or a source of inspiration since, most of the time, everything is still deep inside.

Žydrūnas, 4x World’s Strongest Man, 44

When was the last time you cried?

Everyone cries—kids, grownups, men, and women. I allow myself to do it, but I don’t cry that often. When I’m unlucky, or someone hurts me, it kind of motivates me to move forward, focuses me. I treat things like that as valuable and necessary lessons. Around ten years ago, I had more negative emotions in me, more anger towards others and myself. I learned how to understand others and not to hope that everyone would behave the way I’d like them to. I don’t know what I’d do in another person’s place, do I? So I shouldn’t judge.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

Today marks three years since he passed away. I remember flying in from the USA for his funeral. His death wasn’t an expected one, because he had an operation—I was visiting him almost every day for two months, and then he got better. I flew away without saying goodbye to him… My dad was my idol: he was a strong person with a great sense of humor. And his dad, my grandfather, shaped my values—he was extremely hard working and was continually showing everyone that anything can be achieved if you try hard enough. Grandpa was a very healthy man, and he was upset with people who drank or smoked. He could build anything he liked—a boat, a tractor, he even had parts to build a plane. But he ran out of time. Perhaps examples like these showed me that nothing is impossible. When I was 10, I wrote in my diary that I’d become the champion of football, ice hockey, and bodybuilding. I was always a dreamer.

What’s your relationship with your body?

My body is essential to me. It’s what I work with. I do everything with my body, but the main things always start in my head—visions, aims, and motivation. I love and cherish my body so that it can serve me longer. I want to make it a better home for my soul. Nudity is nothing special to me; I don’t think about it. You don’t shower dressed, so you want to swim in a lake nude, too. My take on this was shaped by life in the countryside, in nature. I spent my childhood in forests, rivers, snow, and parks. I was a part of nature, and my clothes, just like asphalt or other human-made objects, were something that separated people.

Gerardas, waiter, 22

When was the last time you cried?

A few weeks ago, actually. I came back from work and cried because I was lost, I was alone, and my mom’s an alcoholic… It all just burst out of me. I have problems expressing my emotions, especially the sadness inside. I should cry more often.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

I don’t have a dad. He met my mom in Palanga and they had a summer affair. Mom got pregnant, and dad went back to his family. He even offered mom some money for an abortion. I’ve never met him. Some time ago, I found a tiny picture of him online. I zoomed in and noticed that he has the same hair. So that’s one good thing I got from him—beautiful hair. If I ever have my own family, I’ll do everything I can to be a good father. But I need to learn everything; I need to learn how to be a man.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was glad to hear that we would be naked for this. I can’t understand why a man has to be gay if he moves well. Why can’t men just enjoy their bodies and express them? I appreciate nudity. As a teenager, I used to run to the barbershop every time I noticed a curly hair on my head—I wanted to shave it all off and look like a proper geezer. Today, I’m a whole different person.

Matthew, dancer, 23

When was the last time you cried?

The last time I cried was a couple of days ago. I had broken up with my partner/best friend, and it was hard because I had to fully let go of someone who I loved even more than myself. We needed to have time to heal and think before coming back to each other, but we’ll see each other soon.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My relationship with my father is very neutral. I don’t hate him, and I don’t utterly love him. He’s not a man of many words, and most times, neither am I. I admire his resilience and his drive. He’s a smart man who’s lived a colorful life. I’d like to think that I take after him in more ways than one! I resent him for being absent for a great deal of my life. It left me wondering if he cared for his only son or not.

What’s your relationship with your body?

It took a long, long, long, long time for me to become a fan of my body. I used to hate taking my shirt off, so much that I would go to the beach in a full tracksuit. Now, I’m so aware of how beautiful I am that I want to be able to show it in any way I choose. I love nudity—in fact, almost all the shoots I’ve done recently have been nude! I think it’s such an important part of being one with yourself; being able to accept all parts of your body, large, small, wide, narrow, tall, short, EVERYTHING!

Kasparas, business development officer, 36

When was the last time you cried?

I went to Kino Deli along with a bottle of gin punch to see Almodóvar’s film. I was crying with laughter, but also because it hurt inside. I didn’t sob after the breakup with my girlfriend, which was fairly brutal, but I always tear up when watching videos about nature and Africa, especially when I’m hungover.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My parents split up when I was six. Mom took two sons, built a house with her own hands, and raised us. My grandad was a person I admired when I was little—he got up early in the morning to boil water for his long shave. One has to have inner peace to shave like that. I liked his “gentleman’s code of conduct.” In our family, the men don’t pee standing up due to the respect for their women. My grandad and uncles used to wash their socks and underpants. I’ve never seen any toxic masculinity s**t, only respect. When I was a kid and felt ill, I remember my grandad carrying me around in his arms and singing. After he died, I asked my grandma to give me his razor.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I had a few complexes here and there before, but now I just don’t give a s**t. I have a dad bod and I’ve raised a kid on my own! However, I took part in carrying fridges when I was helping someone recently—I realized I do need to get in better shape. Just for myself, to be more durable. Apart from that, I see all cons as pros, all insufficiencies as advantages. I like that people in my circle are unique: they work in car repair shops, shoot guns, go to tanning salons, pierce their ears with crystal earrings, and go to dancing classes. So what? You can be anyone you’d like to be! That’s self-expression!

Margiris, journalist, 27

When was the last time you cried?

I was watching a movie about my sister, Rūta Meilutytė, and I teared up because it reminded me of her victory in the London Olympics. At that time, I was watching the competition in the city, and when she won, I started crying my heart out. I was walking through city streets and weeping.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

A bit complicated, to be honest. But today I’m much less angry and much more trustful. To be less bitter was a conscious decision of mine since anger only brought more pain to those around me. I decided to keep my dad’s good qualities and reject the bad traits, which I notice in myself as well. I see my reflection in my dad. I don’t blame him today for not being there when I was growing up—I understand that times were difficult for him and he had to work so much to support his kids and parents as well. My dad taught me how to read, how to notice injustice and oppose it, and how to be truthful.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I know my body. Perhaps I’m not entirely happy with it, but we’re in synergy. In the teenage years, it was awkward as a guy to appear nude in front of a girl to show her your penis, since you’re not yet sure how it works either. But then one time, my friends and I went skinny-dipping in the sea; no one said anything, and it became so much easier to undress.

Audrius, border guard, 47

When was the last time you cried?

My daughters say they have a very sensitive dad. I don’t know why—perhaps I used to read a lot, and life in the countryside did its thing. My friends were dogs, cats, and nature in general. I saw animals being born all the time, and I felt it all inside.
I was chopping wood at my parents’ property recently. All the fields and meadows around it—all the land my dad and I worked on, our house that used to be there, the garden. I saw a hill that used to look so huge when I was little—my dad made me skis and put the ends of those skis into a tub so those ends would curl up. He gave me a push and I skied down that hill hearing him cheering, “go, go, go!” I cried remembering that, because when you’re standing on your land, oh boy, can you feel it all going right through your soul.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

He was a big storyteller and a great fisherman. It wasn’t appropriate to hug that much back in those days. But I remember him buying a scooter. We called it “the pig.” He said he’d drive to school with it (my dad was a teacher), but we knew he bought it to go fishing. So I was around six years old, and we were coming back home from fishing. It got dark and cold, and a rainstorm started. I felt safe hugging my dad—it felt like a wall was protecting me. I miss this feeling, and I want to make my family feel safe like I was. I want to be that wall to my daughters and wife.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I was a tall kid, a typical basketball player. My friends and I used to try to gain weight and get bulkier during my teenage years. Arnold Schwarzenegger was our idol. I always loved sports, even though I didn’t have a place to exercise.
I remember jumping into small ponds as a kid in the spring, just after the ice melted. We didn’t want to get our clothes wet, so we were all nude.
Sometimes my wife and I talk about growing old, but we’re not afraid of our bodies aging.

Martynas, tattoo artist, 29

When was the last time you cried?

During my wedding at the Burning Man festival. I didn’t cry when saying my vows since I had rehearsed them many times, but when Aistė, my wife, said hers, I broke down. I used to sob a lot more, especially when I was studying at a university in London. It was a dark and depressing time—I had a job I hated just so I could survive, and I was freshly divorced. I felt utterly alone, so I cried because of that. It taught me to be on my own, yet I also realized that human connection is of utmost importance to me. The emptiness goes away when you’re with someone. But I do regularly tear up when I see movies or ads about dogs. I never keep it inside.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

Much like many folks, I have a superficial relationship with my father. When I was a kid, my dad chose his career over parenthood—I was financially secure, which I’m thankful for. But I never kicked a ball with him or shot some hoops. I can’t remember us spending any quality time together, ever. I don’t want this to be the case when I’m a father myself.
Today I feel like the amount of time he spent with me then is precisely as much I want to communicate with him now. We only talk about cars and material stuff—it’s not like we have a strong bond.
I’ve noticed that people of my generation get on with their grandparents much better. Maybe it’s due to the grandparents being born in the interwar years, in a free Lithuania, so their values align with the ones of their grandchildren. I’m always eager to see my grandma—we have a more sincere relationship, and I realize that this won’t last forever, so I appreciate it more.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I hated my body before—I used to feel like I was too skinny in some places and also fat in others. But when the tattoos came, my body became beautiful to me. I’m in a constant process of creating it, much like how people who do sports look at it. It wasn’t hard to pose nude at all.

Reinaldas, food stylist, 31

When was the last time you cried?

I cry very rarely, and not because it’s deemed “unmanly.” I like to cry because then your hormones balance out. But I used to cry from stress and pressure pretty recently when I was working too much. It used to happen on my way to work. I had to be at a movie set at 6 am, start making food at 9 am, and shoot at 1 pm, and then repeat it all many times over. I used to say to myself: “God, will I make it? What am I doing here…”
The last time I cried was in summer when I split up with my boyfriend. I felt sad for our home, dog, seven years together—which is so long in gay years! I wept for a bit, felt terrible for myself, and it was over. It was pretty normal crying for an unconventional man.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

It used to be terrible. My dad was a typical guy; he showed zero emotions; however, when he felt the pressure and burst out, we all felt it. I’m 30 today and my dad has already softened up; he even cried about the bad things he had done before. We have a good relationship now—he comes to visit me and gets to know my boyfriends. He had to change a lot for us to be here today. The big break came when I came out to him. It was Easter and we were watching a TV show with homophobic jokes about hanging gay people. I felt irritated and went out for a smoke. My dad saw that something was wrong, so he followed me outside. I asked him whether he wanted to know what the matter was because he might need to hang me. He cried but didn’t try to “talk me out of it.”
However, the news that I was seeing a psychotherapist was a bigger shock to him. He was probably afraid that this might change our relationship, that I might start blaming him for stuff. But the situation changed for the better when he began dating a psychologist. Now, we all go out for dinner—my boyfriend, my dad, his girlfriend, and me. I think my father is afraid to be alone, so he simply had to change his outlook.

What’s your relationship with your body?

I’m now as heavy as I’ve ever been—I’m also as happy as I’ve ever been. I’m a housewife since I work much less at the moment. And I also have a superpower—I can make absolutely any food I think of. We sit at home binging some series, and suddenly I feel the urge to have cinnamon buns. And so I just make them! And god, do I love dried ham. But I feel good about my body. I do like handsome people, but I prefer people that are truly alive.
I was once very skinny—I felt pretty, but weak. Now I’m overweight. Someone sent me a photo from a movie set—my gut was hanging out, and my dewlap… Yuck. But then I get to rest, sleep a bit more, and I feel better about myself again.

Benediktas (name changed), soldier, 24

When was the last time you cried?

During my uncle’s funeral. Family is the most important thing for people in my circle, and everyone supports everyone. I could never understand how brothers or other relatives don’t talk to each other. I can be mad at my relatives, sure, argue with them passionately, but we’re all like a single, united fist.
At that funeral, my aunt asked me to invite everyone for a mourning meal. But when I saw my uncle being buried, I couldn’t speak—my eyes were full of tears and my voice broke down. I’m not sure that anyone understood what I said. There’s no shame in crying, but I wouldn’t do it in front of strangers—I wouldn’t like them to see me during this tender, painful moment. When I’m alone or surrounded by loved ones—sure, that’s why we have tear glands.

What’s your relationship with your dad?

My father is an honest, upstanding man. He didn’t achieve anything significant since he always had a simple job and had no big ambitions, but in some aspects, he was still a hero of mine. I learned from him, especially how to be a man and a decent person in general. If he engages in something, he fully commits to it, he does a perfect job and looks to fulfill the needs of others as well. He’s respected by everyone, from local homeless people to professionals in high positions. He showed me how to love a woman. My mother is like a match sometimes, she ignites real fast, but dad listens to her in silence patiently and then does whatever needs to be done. Today, my dad is my friend.

What’s your relationship with your body?

Overall, I love my body. It gives me no trouble at all. I always did what I wanted to do, never going to the gym, and still eating what I desire. My guy friends were telling me that I look good while they were working out all the time and weren’t happy with the results. I do see some flaws in how I look, sure, but I believe it’s all part of psychology—we need to change the way we think, not the way we look.

Continue reading For This International Women’s Day, I Got 12 Men To Crush Stereotypes Of Masculinity With My Photoshoot

Ballet Dancers Surprise Passers-By By Practicing Their Moves Out In The Streets

What happens when you take a classical dance and you take it to the streets of New York or Buenos Aires? This photographer reveals the results and they are astonishing.

Omar Z. Robles is a New York-based photographer who is known worldwide for his breathtaking photos of ballet dancers against urban backdrops. With 300k followers on Instagram and counting, he manages to capture movement and express the beauty of a human body in unconventional settings. Having studied in  L’École Internationale de Mimodrame de Paris Marcel Marceau, Robles was mainly inspired by the work of a famous mime actor Marcel Marceau and his ability to interpret the world through a subtle movement.

Robles photography not only showcases the beauty of movement, dance, and human body but it also incorporates amazing and vibrant city architecture. This pavement and ballet shoe duo has already been captured in New York, Bueno Aires, Havana, Mexico City, Chile, Hong Kong.  Take a look what happens when you combine a pirouette and a city that never sleeps down below!

If you’re eager to see more stunning pictures like these, check out our last post about the photographer here and here.

You can find more on Omar Z. Robles Instagram or his personal website. (h/t PopSugar)

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Rugile Matuseviciute

I’m just helping you to stay updated!

Continue reading Ballet Dancers Surprise Passers-By By Practicing Their Moves Out In The Streets

Ballet Dancers Surprise Passers-By By Practicing Their Moves Out In The Streets

What happens when you take a classical dance and you take it to the streets of New York or Buenos Aires? This photographer reveals the results and they are astonishing.

Omar Z. Robles is a New York-based photographer who is known worldwide for his breathtaking photos of ballet dancers against urban backdrops. With 300k followers on Instagram and counting, he manages to capture movement and express the beauty of a human body in unconventional settings. Having studied in  L’École Internationale de Mimodrame de Paris Marcel Marceau, Robles was mainly inspired by the work of a famous mime actor Marcel Marceau and his ability to interpret the world through a subtle movement.

Robles photography not only showcases the beauty of movement, dance, and human body but it also incorporates amazing and vibrant city architecture. This pavement and ballet shoe duo has already been captured in New York, Bueno Aires, Havana, Mexico City, Chile, Hong Kong.  Take a look what happens when you combine a pirouette and a city that never sleeps down below!

If you’re eager to see more stunning pictures like these, check out our last post about the photographer here and here.

You can find more on Omar Z. Robles Instagram or his personal website. (h/t PopSugar)

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Rugile Matuseviciute

I’m just helping you to stay updated!

Continue reading Ballet Dancers Surprise Passers-By By Practicing Their Moves Out In The Streets

8 amazing micro apartments from all over the world

Tiny or micro apartments – one of the recent housing trends of the big busy cities that provide more affordable accommodation solutions for young people, willing to live in their own space, but not necessarily wanting to work long and tiring hours on several jobs only to be able to pay the ridiculous rent for an average apartment shared with a couple of roommates and barely make both ends meet.

The desired privacy and unexpected comfort tiny apartments offer to single people and young couples due to the unique interior designers’ solutions, who employ their creativity and skills to fit a sleeping place, a kitchen, a bathroom, an office area and enough storage space into the tightest quarters ever without making them too claustrophobic and overloaded, make such apartments more and more popular in crowded cities with ridiculously high rent prices and limited housing.

Continue reading 8 amazing micro apartments from all over the world

The 5 Best Places for Art and Design Lovers to Travel in March

March is a major month in the design world. Here’s everything to know about where and how to make the most of it

 

March means two things: art and design fairs and spring break. New York City will host Armory Art Week at the beginning of the month and AD’s annual Design Show toward the end of the month. Meanwhile, Art Basel is set to return to Hong Kong, offering art aficionados a chance to discover the latest work by established and emerging artists. Austin will draw innovators in fields ranging from music and film to tech for the latest edition of SXSW. If you’re itching for a relaxing vacation, you might want to consider a private island getaway at the newly renovated COMO Parrot Cay in Turks and Caicos or plan a safari for the low season, when you can practically have the savannah all to yourself.

New York City

The Freehand.

Photo: Adrian Gaut

March is a busy month in New York, with Armory Art Week kicking off on March 7 and AD’s 17th annual Design Show slated for March 22–25. Between the Armory Show, SCOPE, and VOLTA, Manhattan will draw a who’s who in the contemporary art world. If you’re planning to visit, check out the Roman and Williams-designed Freehand, the latest opening behind the very aesthetic-conscious Sydell Group, which runs the NoMad just a few blocks away. Indulge in a cocktail at the Pool Lounge in the Seagram Building (we recommend the Cucumber, an artful and delicious concoction made with cucumber-infused absinthe) then head downstairs to the Lobster Club for sushi in a madcap space designed by AD100 architect Peter Marino.

Hong Kong

Photo: Getty Images

Art Basel Hong Kong returns March 29–31 with booths by 248 galleries hailing from 32 countries and territories. The buzziest new opening is the Murray, a luxurious new hotel in a landmarked 1969 building in Central with a sleek design by Foster + Partners. Of course, you can’t go wrong at the Peninsula Hong Kong, which has been an icon since it opened in 1928. If you make the trip to this design lover’s paradise, book a table at hip hot spot Ho Lee Fook and check out the design shops at PMQ, the revitalized Police Married Quarters.

Turks and Caicos

Photo: Courtesy of COMO Parrot Cay

Itching for an island getaway? Escape to sunny Turks and Caicos, where you can stay at the renovated COMO Parrot Cay. Located on a private island that’s home to Donna Karan’s estate, the resort reopened in December after repairing some damage from Hurricanes Irma and Maria, with refreshed rooms and a new Beach Club. Its wellness program is designed to help you recharge, with guided beach meditations, yoga and pilates classes, and consultations with the on-staff Ayurvedic doctor from India.

Austin

The Austin Motel pool.

Photo: Courtesy of Austin Motel

Heading to Texas’s capital of cool for SXSW? The annual showcase of music, film, tech, and more will feature Wes Anderson’s latest movie, Isle of Dogs, as its closing-night film. Stay at the Austin Motel, the newest property in Austin by hip hotelier Liz Lambert, who’s also behind the ever-popular Hotel Saint Cecilia.If you can, tack on a few extra days and plan a road trip to Marfa to see Donald Judd’s groundbreaking Chinati Foundation, which added a major new installation by Robert Irwin in 2016.

Tanzania

Photo: KT Merry

Though it’s considered low season, March is an ideal time to visit the Northern and Central Serengeti before the rainy season, which usually starts around April. Leading safari outfitter Extraordinary Journeys recommends this time of year because you can go on game drives and not encounter another vehicle for hours or even the whole day. They partner with several lodges and tented camps, including the conservation-focused Singita, which has a handful of properties in Tanzania, and Bushtops Camps, which has a roving luxury tented camp that packs up and roams around the Serengeti tracking wildlife.

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The 5 Best Places for Art and Design Lovers to Travel in March

March means two things: art and design fairs and spring break. New York City will host Armory Art Week at the beginning of the month and AD’s annual Design Show toward the end of the month. Meanwhile, Art Basel is set to return to Hong Kong, offering art aficionados a chance to discover the latest work by established and emerging artists. Austin will draw innovators in fields ranging from music and film to tech for the latest edition of SXSW. If you’re itching for a relaxing vacation, you might want to consider a private island getaway at the newly renovated COMO Parrot Cay in Turks and Caicos or plan a safari for the low season, when you can practically have the savannah all to yourself.

Continue reading The 5 Best Places for Art and Design Lovers to Travel in March

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