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2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage

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Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

Industrial design students from Pratt paired with The American Hardwood Information Center for their Red Oak Reimagined exhibition. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

 

Yet another reason to journey across the river to the design-centric borough: WantedDesign Brooklyn 2019 has landed at creative hub Industry City and runs through Monday, May 20th. Downstairs you can preview the works of next-generation designers, with student contributions from as near as Pratt (industrial design students paired with The American Hardwood Information Center for their Red Oak Reimagined exhibition) and as far as Universidad Don Bosco, El Salvador and beyond.

Architecture-trained and Caracas, Venezuela-native Rodolfo Agrella designed his Ara lighting collection in collaboration with French brand Procédés Chénel. Photography courtesy of Rodolfo Agrella.

 

Upstairs, Rodolfo Agrella’s playful lighting installation features his unexpectedly fire-resistant and water-repellant Ara paper fixtures produced in collaboration with French brand Procédés Chénel.

California-based designer Elyse Graham traveled to France to craft glassware objects reminiscent of her original resin designs. Photography courtesy of Elyse Graham.

 

Designer Elyse Graham traded her preferred resin material for glass during a week-long residency at CIAV in Meisanthal, France as part of a transatlantic creative exchange. The resulting forms exult in changing colors of glass and applied pattern.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

California-based designer Elyse Graham traveled to France to craft glassware objects reminiscent of her original resin designs. Photography courtesy of Elyse Graham.

With 165 years of glassmaking experience, the Corning Museum of Glass GlassLab provided fodder for Nice-born designer Philippe Nigroto produce colorful objects in just five days, including sculptural totems and playful containers in the age-old material.

French designer Philippe Nigro worked in conjunction with Corning Glass Lab to produce colorful totems and objets. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

 

IC Locals: Timber!, a collection of works by Industry City-based designers and makers curated by Hannah Martin, shows the endless uses for the building-block material, including an organic form crafted via steam-bending by Matthias Pliessnig. While onsite, indulge in the many food venues and relax in generous outdoor spaces.

A sinuous structure in wood by Matthias Pliessnig weaves its way through Hannah Martin’s IC Locals: Timber! Grouping. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN

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Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska. Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

 

An exhibition and pop-up at WantedDesign in Manhattan is spotlighting emerging Polish design, from ceramics to jewelry and even toys. Titled #PLDSGN: Up-And-Coming Designers from Poland, the exhibit is presented by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, an organization dedicated to showcasing Polish arts and culture on the international level. Throughout the exhibit, one trend is clear: a growing preference for sustainable manufacturing and the reduction of environmental impact.

Goods will be for sale at WantedDesign at the Terminal Stores in Manhattan through May 21, and at WantedDesign’s IC Store in Brooklyn from May 23 through June 13. The presentation coincides with the Institute’s launch of its Guide to Polish Design, a comprehensive online document surveying a century of Polish design. Here are five highlights from the exhibition.

Read more: Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

Photography courtesy of Magda Pilaczynska.

Look at Me Plates by Magda Pilaczynska

Illustrator and designer Magda Pilaczynska adorns each of her porcelain dishes with spirited graphics and gilded detailing. Look at Me Plates measure 25 inches across and are equipped with a hanger, so they’re suited to walls as well as tables. Plus, each piece is unique—Pilaczynska crafts and fires each one by hand.

Photography courtesy of UAU Project.

Bubble 06 lamp by UAU Project

To sustain its goal of zero waste and zero emission, UAU Project generally makes its products to order—like this Space Age-inspired lamp, Bubble 06, which the company designed and 3D printed in recyclable bioplastic at its Warsaw studio.

Photography courtesy of ATOMY.

Bangle Bag No. 2 by ATOMY

ATOMY’s line of exclusively hand-sewn bags use only regional materials and plants, and none of it goes to waste. Take, for example, its Bangle Bag No. 2, which is handcrafted of fully organic, vegetable-tanned cowhide leather. It sports a robust wax coating for water resistance, along with a pair of circular 3D-printed handles that lend the tote its name.

Photography courtesy of bro.Kat.

Carbon jewelry by bro.Kat

Strongly influenced by its roots in Europe’s Silesia region, design collective bro.Kat forays into fashion with a new collection of carbon jewelry referencing the region’s days as a wealthy exporter of coal. It’s a project befitting the company’s name, which is both a nod to its home city of Katowice and a play on words, translating, roughly, to “black gold.”

Photography courtesy of Fenek.

Espresso cups by Fenek

At only four centimeters tall, these artisanal cups by Fenek are perfectly scaled for espresso. Handcrafted in porcelain, each features a small face—one of the Warsaw-based studio’s several hallmarks—along with quirky glazes in a range of abstract patterns. 

Read more: Q&A With WantedDesign Co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat

Continue reading Highlights from #PLDSGN: Up-and-Coming Designers from Poland at WantedDesign

16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

Popularity for Danish furniture continues to surge. A great place to experience this in action: 3DaysofDesign, which was held May 23-25 in Copenhagen. With product and brand launches, exhibitions and pop-up events, and a record 150 exhibitors, the sixth edition of Denmark’s annual design event was bigger and bolder this year, with increased citywide presence in part due to a graphic identity crafted by Spanish artist and designer Jaime Hayon. From Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings now available to all, archival pieces finding a new audience, and a reinvention of the lowly toilet brush, here are 16 of our favorite finds.

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

 

Take home your very own Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings with the Holmen collection from Space Copenhagen. Noma, the Copenhagen restaurant lauded as one of the best in the world, auctioned off its oak side tables by cabinet maker Malte Gormsen for a cool $4,000 a piece—while the MG 205 side table by Malte Gormsen was offered at a more reasonable price point. 

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

The browned oak and metal MG 101 dining chair, also part of the Holmen collection by Malte Gormsen for Space Copenhagen, once furnished the 108 restaurant in Copenhagen, a Noma-spin off.

Photography courtesy of Carl Hansen & Søn.

An archival piece with a distinctive pressed veneer backrest saw daylight once more with Carl Hansen & Søn ‘s re-release of the Contour lounge chair, designed by Børge Mogensen in 1949. Available in oak, walnut, or a combination of the two, the chair stays true to original sketches— with the exception of added comfort in the form of an upholstered seat.

Photography courtesy of File Under Pop.

File Under Pop presented a new brand focusing on surfaces, first previewed in Milan last month. A collaboration between File Under Pop founder and creative director Josephine Akvama Hoffmeyer and architect Elisa Ossino, H+O is a modular tile brand applicable for use on walls, floors, and ceilings. The large-format Rilievi collection consists of eight different tiles with three-dimensional geometric surfaces available in four color ways.

Photography courtesy of &Tradition.

The distinctive shape of a fungus brings the USB-chargeable Setago table lamp for &Tradition to life. Just like a mushroom, the wireless lamp, designed by Jaime Hayon and first presented in Milan this year, can be plucked and moved at ease.

Photography courtesy of Takt.

The stackable oak and plywood Cross chair by London studio PearsonLloyd for the freshly launched design brand Takt can be shipped flatpack—one of the factors leading to its sustainable certification. It’s also made of 100 percent FSC-certified wood.

Photography courtesy of Wehlers.

Fishing nets and steel are recycled and repurposed for the fabrication of the R.U.M. chair—short for ReUsedMaterials—designed by C. F. Møller Design for Wehlers.

Photography courtesy of Please Wait to be Seated.

Bulk just where you want it—at the seat pad—is behind the name of the tubular steel Tubby Tube, a stool by Faye Toogood for Please Wait to be Seated.

Photography courtesy of Jot.jot.

The comfort of wood and the strength of steel are a successful union for the slim yet sturdy and stackable Shadow chair by Boris Berlin Design for Jot.jot.

Photography courtesy of Skagerak.

Bold color marks the 20th anniversary of the Cutter Jubilee bench by Niels Hvass for Skagerak , now available in scarlet red-lacquered oak.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

The armchair, later nicknamed the Grasshopper due to its nod to the herbivorous insect, was first designed by Finn Juhl in 1938. However, it wasn’t until much later that the chair’s avant-garde form received appreciation. Before its release at Milan Design Week under House of Finn Juhl, the firm that carries on the designer’s legacy, only two existed—and one auctioned off for $360,000 in 2018.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

House of Finn Juhl also presented Finn Juhl’s extendable Bovirke table, which premiered at an exhibition in 1948. Available in oak or walnut, Bovirke nearly doubles in size, from 55 inches to 94 inches long.

The Bovirke table by Finn Juhl, an archival piece released by House of Finn Juhl. Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.
Photography courtesy of Fredericia.

In tribute to the former home of Copenhagen’s Royal Mail—now the manufacturer’s showroom—Fredericia presented the Post collection by Cecilie Manz. A plywood seat and back combines with a solid wood frame for the Post chair. First previewed in Milan last month, the collection also includes a table.

Photography courtesy of Unidrain.

A 3 Days of Design breakfast event celebrated the lowly toilet brush with a presentation from Unidrain. With an inner container fitted with a splash guard and a replaceable brush head resisting both water and paper collection, Toilet Brush Wall Mounted Copper is engineered to reduce bacteria and mess.

Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.

 The distinctive shape of a technical drawing tool—the compass—inspired the back of the Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman, while cushions take cues from the round sphere it draws.

The Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman. Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.
Photography courtesy of Montana.

Montana introduced a new color palette for its signature shelving—an endeavor the manufacturer undertakes every eight years. Developed in collaboration with Danish designer Margrethe Odgaard, the 30 new hues include amber, rhubarb, flint, and chamomile, shown (clockwise) here.

Continue reading 16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

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