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30 Examples Of Hilariously Polite Graffiti

The reputation of graffiti is not what it used to be. Once viewed as a nuisance and a sign of crime and social degeneracy, more and more cities are taking a new approach by putting up welcome areas for street art, or commissioning artists who are proficient with spray paint to decorate old buildings with murals. Of course, graffiti varies heavily in terms of complexity and mass appeal, and many argue that by arbitrarily picking what kind of street art is socially acceptable and should be encouraged by the law is simply creating a sanitized version of the traditional form of expression, as even the simplest scrawls have a purpose of expressing an opinion, frustration, or simply affirmation that one exists and wants to be heard.Most of the graffiti in this post falls into the latter category, but with one common feature: the writer put it there just to make the next person laugh, smile, or think.

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Falcon 13 hours agoThis made me smile. Very clever.

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MagicalUnicorn 13 hours agoCanada, is that you?

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoThat one way to get it painted by the city.

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Scrawls on bathroom walls are a bit different and fall into a category of their own, a phenomenon that has been the subject of entire academic studies. Officially called “latrinalia,” writing on bathroom walls is something that psychologists have suggested we do because of the potential to express things that may be inappropriate without being suspected, as it’s being done behind closed doors in a space where people usually keep to themselves.

It’s almost like posting on online forums. And much like the modern anonymous comments section, the content often tends toward crude and inflammatory, but this list shows that there are some well-wishers who want to brighten their captive audience’s day.

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Martha Meyer 9 hours agoSo… is it safe for women?

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoLovely writing

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IzzieM 13 hours agoAgree!

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Some people have even used the stereotypical kind of vandalism that city councils hate for material good. Last year saw an epidemic of Brits forcing their local authorities to prioritize road repairs by painting every uninventive tagger’s favorite body part over the offending potholes.

In 2015, one anonymous chaotic good character became infamous for the practice in Manchester, calling himself Wanksy, and apparently the approach that he pioneered has been repeated with success elsewhere. Locals can complain about this method all they want, but they can’t say it doesn’t get the job done.

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John 5 hours ago“Gay” crossed out underneath. Because everyone knows living your mom is so gay.

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Kate Kyffin 7 hours agoHahahahaa

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Firework 13 hours agoTrue for anyone with anxiety

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Salmacys 12 hours agoI love your cat too!

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#11

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DAMIAN HERNANDEZ 3 hours agoTHIS IS OT TRUE!!!!!! im ugly and dont litter

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#12

Graffiti In My Hometown Is Getting Out Of Control

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agosomething a 7 year old would write. Kind of funny

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoHahaha, calling them out for not matching. Too funny

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoMore people need that reminder

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#15

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoNice correction

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#16

It's Okay, Savannah, Ga

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Salmacys 12 hours agoI wanted to write this but didn’t have time to fi

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Elizabeth Schuyler 5 hours agome trying to graffiti

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Hello it Smee 13 hours agoheck you buddy, lol

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Charlotte 12 hours agoIt’s the accurate use of spelling and grammar by two strangers that’s moving me the most!

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tuzdayschild 3 hours agoYou mom loves you too!

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tuzdayschild 3 hours agoI wish everyone knew this truth.

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#22

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Marcellus the Third 11 hours agoThat whole wall looks weirdly photoshopped?

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#23

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Luna Lovegood 7 hours agoWear your helmet, kids!

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#24

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Rickie Cole 9 hours agowas literally there for years until it was recently painted over by a graffiti artist called Helch – I miss Peas

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MagicalUnicorn 13 hours agoi like that cat man, nice addition 🙂

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Luna Lovegood 7 hours agoAgreed!

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Salmacys 12 hours agoAww… thanks! U2!

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tuzdayschild 3 hours agoI don’t always succeed, but I do try.

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#30

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Salmacys 12 hours ago (edited)My Mom’s so heavy-weight I call her Mother Earth.

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Note: this post originally had 75 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

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Graffiti Artist Jimmy Swift Turns Beach Stone Into A Great White Shark And People Love It

If you’ve ever seen a picture of a shark, you know they’re terrifying – just look at all those teeth! But despite the scary appearance, people are gladly taking pictures in front of one on the shores of Palolem Beach, South Goa, India. Now, you might think they’re crazy but relax – the shark isn’t real. It’s actually a beach stone cleverly disguised as a great white shark by American graffiti artist Jimmy Swift back in 2015.

Upon seeing the rock for the first time, the artist instantly knew it was the perfect place for a great white. “It’s truly amazing how mother nature can carve out such a perfect shape,” says the artist.

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American graffiti artist Jimmy Swift disguised this beach stone as a great white shark back in 2015

Image credits: Jimmy Swift

“This was the hardest thing I’ve ever painted. I was literally beat up by the waves and rising tide and forced to stop before it was finished. I could have done better, but between the blowing sand and wind, splashing waves, burning hot sun and the fact I’ve never painted a shark before or painted on a 3 dimensional surface like a rock…. I think it turned out OK,” writes the artist on his Instagram post. “When I first saw this rock it looked like a perfect place for a great white. Hopefully it doesn’t scare the shit out of people! This was inspired by the movie posters from Jaws…. A movie that scared the shit out of me when I was a kid!”

People love taking pictures in front of the shark

Image credits: Jimmy Swift

Image credits: tunnocks_world_tour


Image credits: Jimmy Swift

Image credits: Jimmy Swift

Image credits: Jimmy Swift

Image credits: pv1606

Image credits: northern.gypsy

Image credits: aquaburns

This is not the first time the artist surprised people with creative graffiti – a while before he turned this huge rock into an elephant

Image credits: jimmy_swift

People loved Jimmy’s creative graffiti!









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Rottet Studio Makes Design the Star at the Los Angeles Office of Paradigm

PROJECT NAME Paradigm
LOCATION Los Angeles
FIRM Rottet Studio
SQ. FT. 82,000 SQF

“Light and movement.” That’s what Sam Gores said he wanted to see upon entering his office in Los Angeles. And when the chairman and CEO of Paradigm Talent Agencyasks for something, that is precisely what he gets—particularly when the project is designed by Rottet Studio. Interior Design Hall of Fame member Lauren Rottet’s firm is itself a fixture in the entertainment business, with credits including offices for United Talent Agency and Viacom.

A custom reception desk in folded and welded mirror-polished stainless-steel stands on engineered European white-oak floor planks at Rottet Studio’s Los Angeles office for Paradigm Talent Agency. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

A powerhouse with eight locations across the U.S. as well as in Toronto and London, Paradigm “understood that architecture does matter,” Rottet Studio founding principal Richard Riveire begins. “They really get that an agency can leapfrog over competitors by bringing everyone under one roof, giving them a great place to work, and making sure that conversations and impromptu meetings happen.” So, employees from the music, literary, film, and TV divisions, previously at three separate L.A. sites, are now together in Beverly Hills.

Milo Baughman–inspired chairs face a leather-covered sofa in the green room. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Notable for a landmark fountain, a monumental pyramid, standing in the front courtyard, the 1980s building had a storied past as the former home of the agency ICM Partners but had been vacant for seven years. Though Riveire and principal Harout Dedeyan term their intervention there “tenant improvement,” that’s just Rottet Studio’s typically understated manner. We call the project a complete gut job, with only the limestone and granite wall cladding and the skylight retained. The 82,000-square-foot U-shape interior was entirely rebuilt. Plus, the courtyard, which previously “leaked like a sieve,” Riveire says, was repaved and replanted around the pyramid.

Rising from reception’s sitting area, stairs offer additional seating on vinyl-covered cushions. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The greatest challenge was “to figure out new ways of working inside a 30-year-old building,” Riveire continues. “By jamming things together, we could create an exciting design that changes all the time.” The device that “moved the throttle setting toward more common spaces,” he explains, was the insertion of a central stair atrium—obviously the big move. “We had to whack out 1,000 square feet on two of the floors.” 

A Greg Bogin artwork was commissioned for a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

No mere grand staircase, this. It’s not only the people connector between the three levels but also a multitasker. The lower, wider flight can serve as a vertical space for solo work, thanks to the  blocky cushions scattered across the steps, or as a venue for all-hands company meetings, when combined with the reception area and an adjacent conference room.

On three, the reception area features an armless chair by Karim Rashid. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Flights aren’t stacked but slightly rotated inside circular openings that differ in size—difficult to engineer, to say the least. “LED halos accentuate the perimeters,” Dedeyan says. The ensemble presents quite a climb, especially for those with vertigo. A mirrored ceiling produces a dizzying kaleidoscope effect, making the height appear as six stories, not three.

The courtyard’s new granite, concrete, and turf surfaces surround an existing Eric Orr pyramid fountain. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Sharing dramatic creds is the reception desk. Riveire, who’s highly knowledgeable about hospitality projects, too, compares it to “the front desk of a hotel.” He goes on to liken the long, purposely low form in mirror-polished stainless steel to “a squished pickle.” We see inspirations of sculptures by Anish Kapoor. Regardless, it’s an Instagram moment.

Erik Parker’s acrylic collage on canvas punctuates a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Speaking of art, there’s no shortage of spectacular pieces, some of them commissioned. Initiated by Gores, the program was assembled by a DJ-curator, DB Burkeman, in collaboration with a more conventional art consultant. Standouts include the atrium’s colorful text-based screen prints, kinetic black-and-white photographs of figures in the elevator lobbies, and a corridor’s collage inspired by comic books, hip-hop, and graffiti.

Nylon carpet in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Surprisingly, knowing Rottet Studio as we do, furnishings are generally not custom. Widely available residential pieces, they could be found in many a stylish living room. Flooring, consistent with that vibe, is white-oak planks in common spaces. “The wood is a contrast to all that stone on the walls,” Riveire explains.

The listening room is acoustically isolated. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Carpeted work spaces follow the customary setup. Glass-fronted private offices for agents face assistants at a benching system. Most offices have sit-stand desks. (Many in the stand position during our visit.) Sprinkled among the offices are casual lounges, up for grabs as needed. What’s unusual is the lack of hierarchy among divisions. No single one ranks above any other.

The stair atrium’s mirror-finished stretched mem­brane ceiling reflects a series of 21 screen prints by Eve Fowler. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Conference and meeting rooms and the “signing rooms” encircle the stair atrium. Really, though, everything is an ad hoc meeting space, including  elevator lobbies fitted out with chic and super-comfy seating. There are also pantries and coffee bars aplenty, the best, no doubt, being the ground level’s coffee lounge opening onto the courtyard. Pull up a stool to the marble counter, or plop down on a sofa or armchairs anchored by a houndstooth rug that blends with the same pattern rendered in floor tile.

Reception’s custom wool-silk rug. Photography by Eric Laignel.

The list of amenities goes on: a screening room with adjacent green room, another room filled with candy. According to Paradigm director of special services and guest relations Rozzana Ramos, clients come just to hang out. Linger long enough, and you might spot Antonio Banderas or Henry Golding reading a script or Chris Martin, Ed Sheeren, or Sia headed to the listening room where, Riveire says, they can “crank it up to 11.” 

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

LED halos ringing the stair atrium. Photography by Eric Laignel.
A corridor’s con­struction of album covers with wood and resin by David Ellis. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lounge on two. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Patricia Urquiola chairs appear in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Damien Hirst’s deck for Supreme is mounted with other skateboards in an office area. Photography by Eric Laignel.
In the coffee lounge, a focal wall includes artwork by Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Laser-printed photographs by Kenton Parker energize an elevator lobby. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lacquered logo wall on a granite base. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Project Team: Chris Jones; Theresa Lee; Pegah Koulaeian, Laurence Cartledge: Rottet Studio. Esquared Lighting: Lighting Consultant. Newson Brown Acoustics: Acoustical Consultant. Cybola Systems Corporation: Audio-Visual Consultant. Lendrum Fine Art: Art Consultant. Thornton Tomasetti: Structural Engineer. Arc Engineering: MEP. AMA Project Management: Project Manager. Clune Con­struc­tion Company: General Contractor.

Product Sources: From Front: AM Cabinets: Custom Desk (Recep­tion). Palecek: Coffee Table (Green Room). RH: Chairs, Sofa (Green Room), Sofa (Listening Room). CB2: Console (Green Room), Side Tables (Hall), Sofa, Coffee Table (Lounge), Table (Office), Dining Chairs (Coffee Lounge). Tai Ping Carpets: Custom Rug (Sitting Area). Davis Furniture: Sofas. Holly Hunt: Chairs. West Elm: Side Tables (Lounge, Coffee Lounge, Reception Area). Martin Brattrud: Cushions (Stairway). Blu Dot: Benches (Hall), Stools (Atrium), Credenza (Listening Room), Sofa (Reception Area). Summer Classics: Chairs (Court­Yard). Andreu World: Chairs (Office). Alur: Storefront Sys­tem. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams: Coffee Table (Coffee Lounge). Gus Modern: Sofa. Shaw Hospitality: Rug. Andreu World: Barstools. Thomas O’Brien: Pendant Fixture. Zuo Modern: Chairs (Coffee Lounge), Chairs, Table (Listening Room). Tandus: Rug (Reception Area). Nienkamper: Chair. H.D. Buttercup: Armchairs. West Elm: White Side Table. Bernhardt Design: Bench. Throughout: Monarch Plank: Floor Planks. Bentley: Carpet. Barrisol: Stretched Ceiling Membrane. Benjamin Moore & Co.; Dunn-Edwards Corporation: Paint.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

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These Hotel Frescoes Are Worthy of the Sistine Chapel

If these hotel walls could talk, they’d paint you a picture.

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Discover Napa’s Most Design-Forward, Cutting-Edge New Winery

As a music exec, Kashy Khaledi made a career out of bringing creative personalities together to bridge culture and corporate strategy for Universal Music Group, Google, and Mazda. In his first foray into the wine business, Khaledi has combined Californian midcentury aesthetics and style of winemaking with a modern, multimedia approach to create a Napa winery very much of the moment.

“Wine is alive and real. I would rather worry about Pierce’s Disease than piracy,” Khaledi says. “Also, there’s nothing more depressing than a creative executive over 40.”

 
Photo: Courtesy of Ashes & Diamonds

As you turn off Highway 29 just north of Napa city proper onto the Oak Knoll property, Ashes & Diamonds’ two modular white winery buildings—designed by L.A.-based architect Barbara Bestor, who has also designed Beats by Dre’s headquarters, Intelligentsia coffee’s West Coast flagship, and the Palm Springs Hotel—seem to simultaneously emulate the rolling hills of the valley and leap out from them on a complex that feels somewhere between a Silicon Valley corporate campus and LACMA.

Accessed by a sunshine-yellow door and triple floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors which open onto a grassy area crisscrossed by paths (nicknamed the Quad), the rectangular hospitality building is crowned by a custom perforated, corrugated zigzag canopy which creates dynamic shade and an interplay of light and shadow over the course of the day.

 
Photo: Courtesy of Ashes & Diamonds

Inside, a custom terrazzo bar and eclectic furnishings—a Jean Prouvé desk repurposed as a communal table, Knoll Saarinen lounge chairs in retro-color-pop yellow and purple, a vintage midcentury Cees Braakman sideboard, and scattered North African rugs—create a tasting room that feels like an elevated common room with a variety of places to sit and sip. The most striking features of the taller production building, just behind, are the circular windows set into the cobra-head-shaped first floor, which extends out over an enclosed VIP-tasting-cum-events room and a ground floor breezeway.

 
Photo: Emma K. Morris / Courtesy of Ashes & Diamonds

Bestor says she was briefed to create a serious production facility with capacity for 10,000 cases of wine per year, as well as hospitality spaces that felt like a comfortable living room recalling the midcentury-home-turned-museum Eames House in the Pacific Palisades.

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“While there are nods to Albert Frey in the portholes and Donald Wexler’s folded plate roofs of the midcentury Palm Springs postcard fantasy, we aimed for a lighter and more current take fitting to the industrial nature of wine production and more residential scale of the hospitality,” Bestor explains. Khaledi knew Bestor from his first job, at the Beastie Boys’ record label, and the fanzine Grand Royal, where she was resident architect, and he says he admires her work’s “unwavering spirit of possibility and streak of rebellion.”

 
Photo: Bénédicte Manière / Courtesy of Ashes & Diamonds

When an opportunity arose to buy the property in one of Napa’s most sought-after zip codes, Khaledi, whose father is the eponymous owner of the winery Darioush nearby, felt the aesthetics and mood of midcentury California were a perfect fit for the light-handed wines he loved from the era and wanted to remake.

“The midcentury era isn’t a gimmick for us. It was an era of lightness, optimism, and possibility,” he says. Ashes & Diamonds also pays lip service to Khaledi’s artistic influences. The name is taken from Khaledi’s favorite movie, a Polish film about life’s crossroads and the big decisions people make. The poem printed on each cork, by 19th century Polish poet Cyprian Norwid, is featured in the film in the form of graffiti.

 
Photo: Emma K. Morris / Courtesy of Ashes & Diamonds

Graphic designer Brian Roettinger, best known for art directing album covers such as Jay-Z’s  Magna Carta Holy Grail and Mark Ronson’s hit Uptown Special, was commissioned to create Ashes & Diamonds’ striking monochrome labels. Here, even viniculture has a collaborative, almost band mentality. Rather than hire one winemaker, Khaledi has signed two and gives them props for both their oenology cred and their taste in music. Steve Matthiasson—whose classic, restrained approach to winemaking won him Winemaker of the Year from Food & Wine and San Francisco Chronicle—enjoys skateboarding and punk rock by Minutemen and Dead Kennedys. When she’s not managing the vineyards or scrubbing tanks, Diana Snowden Seysses—alum of Robert Mondavi Winery, Ramey Wine Cellars, and Domaine Dujac in Burgundy—gets her groove on with A Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul.

How does Khaledi feel about his latest creative project?

“Now more than ever, as we’re mentally mutilated by an overabundance of information and ‘breaking news,'” he says, “I find solace in the notion of disconnecting to go outside and meet people in analog.”

 
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