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People Share ‘Accidental Wes Anderson’ Photos Of Real-Life Locations That Belong In His Movies

There’s an interesting photo hunt going on online, which gets even more interesting if you’re a fan of the visual style seen in the iconic movies by director Wes Anderson.

I’m talking about the subreddit called ‘Accidental Wes Anderson,’ in which users upload the pics taken all around the world of buildings, sceneries or even people who seem to belong in the next Wes Anderson flick. And surprisingly, there are quite a few spots from North Korea to Ukraine, that compete for the attention of the famous director.

Maybe there’s a spot like this someplace near you? Then don’t hesitate to share your photos in the comments!

(h/t: boredpanda)

#1 Moomin House In Naantali, Finland

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#2 Stadt-Bad Gotha In Gotha, Germany

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#3 Hotel Belvédère Near The Rhône Glacier, Switzerland

Image source: pierreor

#4 Swimming Pool In Hamburg, Germany

Image source: ScroogeMcDuckII

#5 Dan Sully Photography: Singapore

Image source: Hanna1919

#6 A Chimney Sweep From Tallinn, Estonia

Image source: Hahaieatpoop

#7 Grand Hotel Misurina, Italy

Image source: crboakes

#8 Good Records In Dallas, U.S.

Image source: BlueberryGarcia

#9 Conservatory Of The George Eastman House In Rochester, U.S.

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#10 Door In Kiev, Ukraine

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#11 Metro Train In Brussels, Belgium

Image source: prrisiqueira

#12 Malina Swimming Pool In Bratislava, Slovakia

Image source: JewBoySandler

#13 Conference Room In North Korea

Image source: Nekhera

#14 Train In Flåm, Norway

Image source: asdlkfdjldsknlas

#15 “Ebb Tide” At Gold Crest Resort Motel By Tyler Haughey

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#16 Spadina Road, Toronto

Image source: jake_tobin

#17 Berlin, Germany

Image source: Úlfar Loga

#18 Estoi, Portugal

Image source: ellcarmel

#19 “Chateau” By Jeremy Kohm In Ottawa, Canada

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#20 The Exchange District In Winnipeg, Manitoba

Image source: sauze

#21 Hotel Saratoga In Havana, Cuba

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#22 Cinema

Image source: Rpittrer

#23 Home Office Of An Mcm House In Portland, Oregon

Image source: imgur

#24 Hotel Principe Di Savoia In Milan, Italy

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#25 Mongolia

Image source: ferrets54

#26 Choi Hung Estates In Hong Kong

Image source: dekdekwho

#27 Room In The Ostel Hotel In East Berlin, Germany

Image source: Meunderwears

#28 Jane Hotel In New York, U.S.

Image source: Rustedbones

#29 The Utter Inn Located In Västerås, Sweden

Image source: Meunderwears

#30 Lobby Bar Of The Graduate Hotel In Mississippi, U.S.

Image source: PapaCoke

#31 Pennsylvania Railroad Suburban Station, Pennsylvania

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#32 Locker Room

Image source: from_nods_to_nothing

#33 Beauty Salon Waiting Area In North Korea

Image source: thin_crust

#34 Grand Hotel De L’europe, Bad Gastein, Austria

Image source: stepahin

#35 Ballet Class

Image source: DesignRed

#36 Burabai Lake, Kazakhstan

Image source: aplusmina

#37 Metro Entrance In Budapest, Hungary

Image source: Liam_Noble

#38 Hippie

Image source: MrsDoubtfire3669

#39 Hamble-Warsash Ferry Shelter In Hampshire, UK

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#40 Stenbock Palace, Stockholm, Sweden

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#41 Lighthouse In Snæfellsjökull National Park, Iceland

Image source: DatNatiBoy

#42 Empty Pool

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#43 Conference Room In The Former Palast Der Republik In Berlin, Germany

Image source: Meunderwears

#44 Employee Enters Room At Mount Kumgang Resort In North Korea

Image source: saulbloodyenderby

#45 Ribersborgs Open-Air Bath In Malmö, Sweden

Image source: mo3li

#46 The View Out Of Train Heading Into Austria

Image source: SevFTW

#47 Prada Marfa In Valentine, Texas, U.S.

Image source: jurchej

#48 Florida, U.S.

Image source: tony_spumoni

#49 Hotel Polonia In Warsaw, Poland

Image source: Your_Moms_Flame

#50 Office Of Coccinelle

Image source: audreyxpeng

Continue reading People Share ‘Accidental Wes Anderson’ Photos Of Real-Life Locations That Belong In His Movies

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25 Amazing People’s Choice Photos From The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Contest 2019

Back in the middle of October, Yongqing Bao was announced the Wildlife Photographer of the Year (WPY) for his amazing photograph of a Tibetan fox engaging with a Himalayan marmot, titled “The Moment”. And now, almost two months later, The Natural History Museum has chosen 25 more incredible wildlife photos from the WPY 2019 shortlist for the LUMIX People’s Choice award.

As before, the photos showcase the complex relationships between both humans, and the animals themselves. And, clearly, no animal is too big or too small for these photographers – they’ve captured all sorts of animals, ranging from tiny mice to giant humpback whales. See the incredible photos in the gallery below and don’t forget to cast your own vote – you can do so hereuntil Tuesday, February 4th, 2020.

#1 “The Surrogate Mother”, Martin Buzora, Canada

Image source: Martin Buzora

Elias Mugambi is a ranger at Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in northern Kenya. He often spends weeks away from his family caring for orphaned black rhinos like Kitui here. The young rhinos are in the sanctuary as a result of poaching or because their mothers are blind and cannot care for them safely in the wild.

#2 “Station Squabble”, Sam Rowley, UK

Image source: Sam Rowley

Sam discovered the best way to photograph the mice inhabiting London’s Underground was to lie on the platform and wait. He only saw them fight over scraps of food dropped by passengers a few times, possibly because it is so abundant. This fight lasted a split second, before one grabbed a crumb and they went their separate ways.

#3 “Winter’s Tale”, Valeriy Maleev, Russia

Image source: Valeriy Maleev

Valeriy encountered this Pallas’s cat while it was out hunting in the Mongolian grasslands – it was -42°C (-44°F) on that frosty day, but the fairy tale scene cancelled out the cold. Pallas’s cats are no bigger than a domestic cat and they stalk small rodents, birds and occasionally insects.

#4 “Mother Knows Best”, Marion Vollborn, Germany

Image source: Marion Vollborn

While on a bear watching trip to the Nakina River in British Columbia, Canada Marion spotted a grizzly bear and her young cub approach a tree. The mother bear started to rub against the tree trunk and was followed shortly by the cub, imitating its mother.

#5 “Tender Play”, Steve Levi, USA

Image source: Steve Levi

It was early March and Steve spotted this mother polar bear and her two cubs after 10 days of looking. They had recently left their birthing den in Wapusk National Park, Canada, to begin the long journey to the sea ice so their mother could feed. After a nap the cubs were in a playful mood.

#6 “Trustful”, Ingo Arndt, Germany

Image source: Ingo Arndt

For over two years Ingo has followed the pumas of Torres del Paine National Park, in Patagonia, Chile. This female was so used to his presence that one day she fell asleep nearby. On wakening, she glanced at him in a familiar way, and he was able to capture this portrait of a completely relaxed puma.

#7 “Inquisitive”, Audun Rikardsen, Norway

Image source: Audun Rikardsen

From a hide on the coast of northern Norway, it took Audun three years of planning to capture this majestic bird of prey in its coastal environment. After some time, the golden eagle became curious of the camera and seemed to like being in the spotlight.

#8 “What A Poser”, Clement Mwangi, Kenya

Image source: Clement Mwangi

In Kenya’s Maasai Mara National Reserve, Clement spent time observing this beautiful leopard as she soaked up the last warm rays of the setting sun. Clement is mindful to remember to take pleasure in life’s simple moments – being all too aware that sometimes, as a wildlife photographer, you can miss the exceptional while looking for the unusual.

#9 “The Unwelcome Visitor”, Salvador Colvée Nebot, Spain

Image source: Salvador Colvée Nebot

Over several months, Salvador watched different species of bird use the dead flower spike of this agave in Valencia, Spain as a perch before descending to a small pond to drink. A pair of common kestrels were frequent visitors though each time they came magpies would hassle them.

#10 “Training Session”, Stefan Christmann, Germany

Image source: Stefan Christmann

When Stefan came across this penguin couple in Atka Bay, Antarctica, seemingly with an egg, he was surprised as it was too early in the season for egg-laying. Upon closer inspection he discovered the egg was a snowball! Perhaps the diligent couple were practicing egg transfer in preparation for when their real egg arrived. This is possibly the first time it has ever been witnessed and documented.

#11 “Teamwork”, Jake Davis, USA

Image source: Jake Davis

Jake was on a boat off the coast of Great Bear Rainforest, British Columbia, Canada where he watched humpback whales bubble-net feeding. Here the lead whale dives to locate the fish, once the fish are located, the rest of the pod swim in decreasing circles while blowing bubbles which create a net, trapping the fish.

#12 “Matching Outfits”, Michel Zoghzoghi, Lebanon

Image source: Michel Zoghzoghi

Michel was in the Pantanal, Brazil photographing jaguars. One afternoon, as he was on the Três Irmãos River, a mother and her cub crossed right in front of his boat. He watched mesmerized as they left the water holding an anaconda with a very similar pattern to their own.

#13 “A Suitable Gift”, Marco Valentini, Italy

Image source: Marco Valentini

Marco was in Hortobágyi National Park, Hungary when he spotted these kestrels displaying typical courtship behaviour. Here the female has just received an offering of a young green lizard from her suitor and in this touching moment she tenderly took hold of his claw.

#14 “Spot The Reindeer”, Francis De Andres, Spain

Image source: Francis De Andres

The conditions for photographing at the Norwegian archipelago Svalbard are extreme, but wildlife has adapted to the environment and its freezing temperatures. Francis found this composition of white arctic reindeer, which were observing him, both curious and charming.

#15 “Dressed For Dawn”, Csaba Tökölyi, Hungary

Image source: Csaba Tökölyi

Csaba had been in a hide all night photographing nocturnal species and their activities, but as the golden light of dawn reflected on the surface of the water, an egret in wonderful breeding plumage stopped close by. The elongated scapular feathers covered the bird as if it was wearing a gown.

#16 “The Humpback Calf”, Wayne Osborn, Australia

Image source: Wayne Osborn

Wayne spotted this male humpback calf and its mother while diving off the Vava’u Island group in the Kingdom of Tonga. The calf kept a curious eye on Wayne as it twisted and turned before returning to its mother periodically to suckle. She was relaxed and motionless 20 metres (65 feet) below.

#17 “Family Get-Together”, Michael Schober, Austria

Image source: Michael Schober

Marmots have become accustomed to the presence of humans in Hohe Tauern National Park, Austria and allow people to observe and photograph them at close range. This behaviour is beneficial for the marmots, as human company deters predators such as golden eagles.

#18 “Beak To Beak”, Claudio Contreras Koob, Mexico

Image source: Claudio Contreras Koob

Ría Lagartos Biosphere Reserve in the state of Yucatán is home to Mexico’s largest flock of Caribbean flamingos. This chick is less than five days old – it will stay in its nest less than a week before it joins a crèche of other youngsters who wander around the colony searching for food.

#19 “Big Ears”, Valeriy Maleev, Russia

Image source: Valeriy Maleev

Valeriy was on a summer expedition to the Mongolian part of the Gobi Desert when he happened upon a long-eared jerboa. As blood moves through the ears of these usually nocturnal animals, excess heat dissipates across the skin and so the jerboa is able to stay cool.

#20 “Captive”, Marcus Westberg, Sweden

Image source: Marcus Westberg

A giant panda sits in its cage in a breeding centre in Shaanxi, China. With a growing wild population and no realistic plan of how to breed and raise pandas for rerelease into the wild rather than a life in captivity – not to mention lack of habitat being the largest barrier to the continued spread of the wild population – it is unclear how such centres will benefit the species.

#21 “Ocean´s Signature”, Angel Fitor, Spain

Image source: Angel Fitor

Angel took this image in the waters off of Alicante, Spain. Immersed in a strong current, an otherwise slightly undulating salp chain twists and turns forming whimsical shapes. Salps move by contracting, which pumps water through their gelatinous bodies.

#22 “Bon Appétit”, Lucas Bustamante, Ecuador

Image source: Lucas Bustamante

Night hikes through the Ecuadorian jungle are one of Lucas’ favourite activities. With a keen interest in herpetology, he was overjoyed to spot this labiated rainfrog which are abundant in the region. It had just caught a baby tarantula and its comical expression said ‘caught in the act!’

#23 “A Pulsing Sea”, David Doubilet, USA

Image source: David Doubilet

A school of red tooth triggerfish form a cloud of silhouettes above a river of convict blennies flowing over the coral in Verde Island Passage, Philippines. The Passage, a strait that separates the islands of Luzon and Mindoro, is one of the most productive marine ecosystems in the world.

#24 “Meeting Place”, Yaz Loukhal, France

Image source: Yaz Loukhal

After a rough journey by sea to the remote Snow Hill Island off the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, Yaz flew by helicopter and then trekked through thick snow to reach the emperor penguin colony. His efforts were rewarded with this incredible view of the whole colony.

#25 “Losing The Fight”, Aaron Gekoski, UK

Image source: Aaron Gekoski

Orangutans have been used in degrading performances at Safari World, Bangkok – and many other locations – for decades. The shows were temporarily stopped in 2004 due to international pressure, but today the shows continue – twice a day, every day – with hundreds of people paying to watch the orangutans box, dance, play the drums and more.

Continue reading 25 Amazing People’s Choice Photos From The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Contest 2019

The Creator Of The “Good Boy” Comic Just Shared Another Tear-Jerking Comic About A Black Cat

Even in the 21st century, there is a superstition surrounding black cats. Some people believe they bring bad luck and simply want nothing to do with them. Sadly, this often results in a large number of black cats that are left unadopted in animal shelters. To draw more attention to this problem, Jenny Jinya, a freelance illustrator from Germany, recently shared a tear-jerking comic about a little black cat.

“Even in 2019, you still hear of black cats being associated with superstitions, witches, black magic and such,” writes the artist on her Instagram post. “Black shelter pets are less likely to be adopted than pets of other colors. They still face so much hate nowadays and the more I read about this topic, the sadder I get.” See Jenny’s comic below.

More info: jenny-jinya.com | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter




“There are dozens of posters and infographics with various statistics about abandoned or abused animals. Many know the problems, but such information is quickly forgotten,” said Jenny in a recent interview with Bored Panda. The artist says that with her comics, she tries to give a voice to the victims. She wants the affected pets to be able to tell their stories and hopes that this way she can raise awareness.

A little while ago, Jenny shared a similar comic featuring a puppy and a boy










People started sharing pictures of their own black kitties in response to Jenny’s comic

















Aušrys Uptas

One day this guy just kind of figured “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending around the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness, so if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Universität Stuttgart Uses Robotics and Biomimicry to Create an Outdoor Event Pavillion

Researchers from Universität Stuttgart in Germany look to a sea creature and advanced digital timber-fabrication methods to construct an event pavilion called Buga Wood Pavilion for a horticultural show.

A group of 18 researchers and craftsmen led by Universität Stuttgart professors Jan Knippers, a structural engineer, and Achim Menges, an architect contributed to the project. “A biomimetic approach to architecture enables interdisciplinary thinking,” says Menges.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20

Buga Wood Pavilion took 13 months to develop, and 17,000 robotically milled finger joints and 2 million lines of custom robotic code to build.

Photography courtesy of Universität Stuttgart.

To create the Buga Wood Pavilion for a horticultural show in nearby Heilbronn, Germany, researchers at Universität Stuttgart’s Institute for Computational Design and Construction and its Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design developed a robotic-manufacturing platform to CNC-cut geometric panels and form a segmented timber shell.

Photography courtesy of Universität Stuttgart.

Composed of spruce laminate, a rubber waterproofing layer, and a larch plywood exterior, the individual segments were fabricated at Müllerblaustein Holzbauwerke, a local workshop. 

Photography courtesy of Universität Stuttgart.

Working on boom lifts, craftsmen assembled the structure on-site over 10 days. 

Photography courtesy of Universität Stuttgart.

The 376 segments were joined via steel bolts. 

Photography courtesy of Universität Stuttgart.

The pavilion’s form is based on the exoskeleton of the sea urchin. 

Photography by Roland Halbe.

Buga’s form echoes the surrounding land­scape of  Sommerinsel, one of the 15 sites that the biennial Bundesgarten­schau takes place this year. 

Photography by Roland Halbe.

The combination of spruce, rubber, and larch plywood make the installation acoustically sound. 

Photography by Roland Halbe.

Fully assembled, the pavilion spans 104 feet and reaches 23 high.

Photography by Roland Halbe.

It is hosting concerts, lectures, and workshops through October 6, when it will be disassembled for future use. 

Photography by Roland Halbe.

LEDs illuminate the shell at night. 

> See more from the July 2019 issue of Interior Design

Swarovski and Mass Beverly Name Brilliance of Design Winners

Ever the mentors and proponents of design with a capital D, Swarovskiand LA’s Mass Beverly showroom initiated the Brilliance of Design competition. The charge was to push the potential of crystals in three categories: lighting, home décor, and architectural surfaces. Talk about global entries. The 56 submissions came from the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, France, Sweden, Greece, Israel, Brazil, Colombia, and Poland, as well as from New York and Los Angeles, closer to home.

Josha Roymans’ Aurora Borealis pendant is a wave of translucent glass and crystals capped by a strip of LEDs. Rendering courtesy of Josha Roymans.

Josha Roymans, with a multi-disciplinary studio in Amsterdam, won the lighting award with his proposal for Aurora Borealis, inspired by the so-named northern lights. The design is a wave-like pendant of translucent glass and crystals capped by a strip of LEDs that allow for color changes.

From left: Josha Roymans, Tilman Bartl, and Bahata Saha.
Rings of crystal in differing sizes and gradations of color stack in Tilman Bartl’s flexible and contemporary vase. Rendering courtesy of Tilman Bartl.

 

In home décor, German product designer Tilman Bartl won for his vase of stacking crystal components. Cited for its flexibility and strongly contemporary approach, the product has another plus. According to Mass Beverly founders Mary Ta and Lars Hypko, it is predicted to be eminently sellable.

Bahata Saha’s architectural surface has Swarovski crystals arrayed in organic patterns between layers of translucent white marble. Rendering courtesy of Bahata Saha.

 

A Parsons School of Design student, Bahata Saha, took the award for her architectural surface—panels based on two layers of white translucent marble sandwiching crystals arrayed in organic compositions simulating abstract veining.

Each winning designer will receive a $5,000 grant for future crystal projects. Collaborating with Nadja Swarovski, who oversees the company’s corporate branding and communications, the judges were Yves Behar, founder of San Francisco-based Fuseproject; Mary Ta and Lars Hypko; and Interior Design’s deputy editor Edie Cohen.

Continue reading Swarovski and Mass Beverly Name Brilliance of Design Winners

Kvistad Gives Digital Studio Bakken & Bæck’s Office a Refresh

Custom powder-coated steel cabinetry meets Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup pendant fixtures and Norm Architects tables in the Amsterdam meeting area. Photography by Tekla Evelina Severin.

Proud of its employee-satisfaction record, digital studio Bakken & Bæck sees itself as one big family. So perhaps it’s not surprising that the company turned to real-life siblings to refresh its offices in Oslo and Amsterdam.

What is surprising, however, is that Norwegian brother and sister—and next-door neighbors—Bjarne and Astrid Kvistad had no interior design credentials. But they and their respective spouses, Miriam and Ziemowit—who has assumed his wife’s surname—share many creative skills, from knitting to carpentry, and simply wanted to work together. Bjarne, then a graphic designer at Bakken & Bæck, knew the company wanted to expand its Oslo cafeteria, so the nascent Kvistad firm made its first project pitch. “We met with Bakken & Bæck’s executive team,” Ziemowit reports, “and they liked our crazy ideas so much that they decided to overhaul the entire office.”

The lounge features polyester carpet covering the floor, banquette base, and walls. Photography by Lasse Fløde.

 

To re-energize the tired 6,500-square-foot former industrial quarters, the designers came up with a theme: Scandinavian Spaceship. “We love 1970s interiors,” Astrid explains. Inspired by a sample of azure solid surfacing, the firm wrap­ped the entire space in seamless Nordic blue, with six gathering areas adding playful pops of con­trasting color. They carpeted some walls and, having learned weaving, created rugs to hang as art on others. “Then we chose furnishings with slender legs, so they look like they are floating,” Astrid adds.

The Oslo office coatroom features a steel hanging system. Photography by Lasse Fløde.

Bakken & Bæck ended up loving the Oslo office so much, the studio engaged Kvistad to overhaul its Amsterdam outpost. The firm was presented with 2,000 square feet consisting of a long, low room, with one big window overlooking a canal. “It made us think of Yellow Submarine!” Ziemowit says.

The love seat in the Oslo office area is by Swedish design studio Note (as are the lounge chairs in the Amsterdam break-out area). Photography by Lasse Fløde.

While clearly having fun, the Kvistads, who have just completed a third Bakken & Bæck office in Bonn, Germany, had to work hard at their new profession. “The biggest challenge was doing everything—from the business side to making furniture—for the first time,” Ziemowit says. “But we did it.”

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

The oak flooring in the Amsterdam break-out area and elsewhere is original. Photography by Tekla Evelina Severin.
The Oslo kitchen’s solid-surfacing counter and sink helped inspire the color palette throughout. Photography by Lasse Fløde.
Its custom wall-hung rugs in the Amsterdam office are wool. Photography by Tekla Evelina Severin.
The sofa in the Amsterdam office’s lounge is upholstered in a custom cotton blend. Photography by Tekla Evelina Severin.
Logos for both offices are in neon. Photography by Lasse Fløde.
Most of the Oslo workplace was painted from floor to ceiling. Photography by Lasse Fløde.

Sources: From Top: Areti: Sconces (Lounge). Bemz: Custom Sofa Uphol­Stery. Ikea: Sofa (Lounge), Hanging System (Coatroom), Tables (Office Area). &Tradition: Ceiling Fixture (Lounge). Kvadrat: Custom Pillow Fabric. Hay: Table (Lounge), Vase (Break-Out Area). Satelliet: Chairs (Office Area). Sancal: Love Seat (Office Area), Lounge Chairs (Break-Out Area). DuPont: Solid Surfacing (Kitchen). Vola: Sink Fittings. Gubi: Pendant Fixtures (Meeting Area). Menu.As: Tables, Chairs. Eumenes: Armchairs. Tacchini: Table (Break-Out Area). Throughout: Jotun: Paint. Eg Prosjekt: General Contractor (Oslo). Venserojecten: General Contractor (Amsterdam).

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

Continue reading Kvistad Gives Digital Studio Bakken & Bæck’s Office a Refresh

The 10 Best Designed Basketball Courts in the World

Basketball courts do not need to be spectacular in design to accomplish their purpose. In fact, they require only to be ninety-four feet by fifty feet while containing two hoops on the far side of each other. But that hasn’t stopped people the world over from designing some beautiful basketball courts. Whether they are built along a floating boat, like the one near Siem Reap, Cambodia, or painted in bold colors, as they are in Paris’s 9th arrondissement, these courts will even attract those who don’t love the sport. Now that you know about these spots, you really have no excuse to burn off those extra calories while traveling the world and tasting the local cuisines.

 

1/10

St. Louis, Missouri

Designed by artist William LaChance, the basketball courts showcase the bold, brightly colored abstract work the St. Louis-based painter is known for. The location of the courts are significant, as it’s a few blocks away from the areas of Ferguson surrounded by riots in 2014.

Photo: Courtesy of Marcus Buck

2/10

Munich, Germany

Located in Munich, Germany, this basketball court is different from every other court in the world. And that’s due to the mounds and lights throughout the space. While it might not be the friendliest court on your ankles, it surely is kind on the eyes.

Photo: Getty Images

3/10

Dubrovnik, Croatia

For those who are lucky enough to play basketball within City Wall Rooftop Court in Dubrovnik, Croatia, the experience will likely stay with them for a lifetime. Not only is the court set within the old, terra-cotta roofs of the city, but the views of the Adriatic Sea are something out of a fairy tale in Croatia.

Continue reading The 10 Best Designed Basketball Courts in the World

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