Tag Archives: Frank Gehry

21 Stunning Rule-Bending Buildings By Architect Frank Gehry

When it comes to architecture, like in all forms of art, there is no unified opinion on how it’s supposed to look like. Every architect follows its own path – and that’s what makes them and the buildings they design unique. However, there sometimes emerge people, whose unique talent is impossible to compare to anyone else’s. And one of those people is Frank Gehry.

Bored Panda has compiled a list of some of this architect’s most iconic designs and his rule-defying buildings will leave you mesmerized. Check them out in the gallery below!

h/t: Bored Panda

#1 Fred And Ginger, Prague, Czech Republic

Image source: el_ave

Perhaps one of the most iconic and controversial buildings designed by this artist is the Dancing House, or Fred and Ginger, in Prague, Czech Republic. Although at first it was criticized for not fitting in with the classical buildings surrounding it, the Dancing House has now become somewhat of an icon and is even featured on a gold 2,000 Czech koruna coin.

#2 Museum Of Pop Culture, Seattle, Washington

Image source: Kay Gaensler

Although the building slightly resembles a Moscow Mule mug, it was actually inspired by the energetic rock music and the architect says he even used guitar pieces to create the form.

#3 Stata Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Image source: Thomas Hawk

The Stata Center, or The Ray and Maria Stata Center for Computer, Information and Intelligence Sciences, was built in 2004 for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, replacing an old building called simply “Building 20”.

#4 Marqués De Riscal Hotel, Elciego, Spain

Image source: LC_24

The Marqués De Riscal Hotel is an extravagant and lavish building located in the small Spanish town of Elciego. It is truly an unexpected sight when visiting, especially since it’s surrounded by fields and small homes.

#5 Walt Disney Concert Hall In Los Angeles, California

Image source: Christopher Chan

This stunning concert hall (inspired by wind, according to Gehry) was finished back in 2003 after a whopping 15 years of building and cost $274 million. However, both local residents and critics agree that it was worth it – the building is a real icon of modern architecture.

#6 Lou Ruvo Center, Las Vegas, Nevada

Image source: vegasracer

The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health was finished in 2010 and was commissioned by a businessman of the same name, whose father died of Alzheimer’s disease.

#7 Vitra Design Museum, Weil Am Rhein, Germany

Image source: Wladyslaw

The Vitra Design Museum was not only Frank Gehry’s first project in Europe but also the first one where he used curved forms.

#8 Guggenheim Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain

Image source: Wojtek Gurak

This museum of modern and contemporary art built in Bilbao is said to have brought the city back to life – in the first year, it attracted many tourists to the city, generating a $160 million profit. This phenomenon was even given a name – the Bilbao Effect.

#9 Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building, Sydney, Australia

Image source: Summerdrought

This building finished in 2015 was Gehry’s first project in Australia. Over 300,000 custom-made bricks were used in the construction of the building.

#10 Biomuseo, Panama City, Panama

Image source: Bob Zumwalt

The Biomuseo was the architect’s first project in Latin America. It was commissioned by Panamanian politicians in order to create another Bilbao Effect. The bright colors are said to represent the rich nature of Panama.

#11 Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, France

Image source: mksfca

The museum, opened in 2014, is located by the Bois de Boulogne park in Paris. 19,000 concrete and 3,600 glass panels were used in the creation of the building.

#12 Art Gallery Of Ontario, Toronto, Canada

Image source: Luca Penati

This the first time Gehry finished a project in his home city of Toronto. He was 79 at the time.

#13 Marta Herford, Herford, Germany

Image source: Wittekind

Gehry transformed this old textile factory in Germany into a piece of modern art.

#14 The Fish, Barcelona, Spain

Image source: hkpuipui99

The Fish is a truly unique building, even by Gehry’s standards. It was built in 1992 for the Olympics that were held in Barcelona that year.

#15 Weisman Art Museum In Minneapolis, Minnesota

Image source: jpellgen (@1179_jp)

The building was completed in 1993 and contains over 25,000 pieces of art inside.

#16 The Iac Building, New York

Image source: gigi_nyc

The IAC building was completed in 2007 and looks rather tame when compared to the architect’s other works. It is said to resemble the sails of a ship.

#17 Binoculars Building, Venice, Los Angeles, California

Image source: Wally Gobetz

The building was originally called the Chiat/Day building but you have to admit that Binocular Building suits it way better.

#18 Peter B. Lewis Building, Cleveland, Ohio

Image source: Ron Dauphin

The building, named after a philanthropist and CEO of an insurance company, houses the Weatherhead School of Management.

#19 Frank Gehry’s Residence In Santa Monica, California

Image source: IK’s World Trip

As one would expect, Frank Gehry lives in quite an eccentric house himself – the many intricate shapes and forms never fail to attract attention from both passers-by and future clients.

#20 Richard B. Fisher Center, Annandale-On-Hudson, New York

Image source: SCL Boston

The Richard B. Fisher Center was opened back in 2003 and since then has been described as “the best small concert hall in the United States”. Just don’t be deceived by the outside – on the inside, the building contains two theaters and several rehearsal studios.

#21 The Cinémathèque Française, Paris, France

Image source: grego1402

This building, designed by Frank Gehry, contains one of the largest collections of movie-related objects in the world.

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This Architect-Designed Furniture Is More Conceptual Than Conventional

No-Thing The Chicago-based designer Ania Jaworksa contributed a freestanding bookshelf to “No-Thing.” Its curved base means it cannot be place flat against a wall. Courtesy Dan KuklaTwo ongoing exhibitions at the Friedman Benda gallery in Manhattan feature furniture designed by architects.Courtesy Dan KuklaInside the Walls: Architects Design, collects furniture designed by canonical figures such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Gio Ponti, and Richard Meier, among others. Pictured is Gerrit Rietveld’s Armchair Model no. R54 (1942).”

The first show, Inside the Walls: Architects Design, collects furniture designed by canonical figures such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Gio Ponti, and Richard Meier, among others. Pictured is Gerrit Rietveld’s Armchair Model no. R54 (1942).Courtesy Friedman BendaInside the Walls: Architects Design Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1921 Peacock chair was designed for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.”

Inside the Walls: Architects Design Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1921 Peacock chair was designed for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.Courtesy Friedman BendaInside the Walls: Architects Design A 1951 coffee table designed by the Italian design giant Gio Ponti”

Inside the Walls: Architects Design A 1951 coffee table designed by the Italian design giant Gio PontiCourtesy Friedman BendaInside the Walls: Architects Design Louis Kahn forayed into furniture design with this desk he designed for clients Morton and Lenore Weiss to suit the house he built for them in 1950.”

Inside the Walls: Architects Design Louis Kahn forayed into furniture design with this desk he designed for clients Morton and Lenore Weiss to suit the house he built for them in 1950.Courtesy Friedman BendaInside the Walls: Architects Design Frank Gehry’s 1973 Easy Edges furniture collection made ingenious use of corrugated cardboard. Pictured is a rocking chaise longue. “

Inside the Walls: Architects Design Frank Gehry’s 1973 Easy Edges furniture collection made ingenious use of corrugated cardboard. Pictured is a rocking chaise longue. Courtesy Friedman BendaNo-Thing was curated by Juan Garcia Mosqueda, the curator and founder of the design gallery Chamber.”

No-Thing was curated by Juan Garcia Mosqueda, the curator and founder of the design gallery Chamber.Courtesy Dan KuklaNo-Thing It’s not immediately clear how one might begin to use architecten de vylder vinck taillieu’s Kamer Frank, a pile of plywood, chipboard, and color-coated MDF.”

No-Thing It’s not immediately clear how one might begin to use architecten de vylder vinck taillieu’s Kamer Frank, a pile of plywood, chipboard, and color-coated MDF.Courtesy Dan KuklaNo-Thing frame 01, SO-IL’s answer to the No-Thing curatorial prompt, defies description. The chain-link construction can handle several sitters at a time.”

No-Thing frame 01, SO-IL’s answer to the No-Thing curatorial prompt, defies description. The chain-link construction can handle several sitters at a time.Courtesy Dan KuklaNo-Thing Leong Leong’s set of complementary “rockers,” one heavy (made of gneiss stone) and the other light (made of perforated stainless steel)”

No-Thing Leong Leong’s set of complementary “rockers,” one heavy (made of gneiss stone) and the other light (made of perforated stainless steel)Courtesy Dan KuklaNo-Thing MOS’s Model Furniture No. 5 (Table) is among the standouts of No-Thing.”

No-Thing MOS’s Model Furniture No. 5 (Table) is among the standouts of No-Thing.Courtesy Dan KuklaNo-Thing The Chicago-based designer Ania Jaworksa contributed a freestanding bookshelf to “No-Thing.” Its curved base means it cannot be place flat against a wall. ” 

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Friedman Benda Offers Up One-Off Furnishings by Great Architects

Easy Edges chaise by Frank Gehry, 1973. Photography by Dan Kukla.

The worlds of architecture and furniture are inextricably related—that may be why many of history’s greatest architects, such as Jean Prouvé, Oscar Niemeyer, and Zaha Hadid, also lent their prowess to product design. New York gallery Friedman Benda is exploring these commonalities in two concurrent exhibitions, one revisiting mid-century classics and another highlighting contemporary front runners.

Prototype Chair by Warren Platner, 1965. Photography by Dan Kukla.

Starting at mid-century, furniture dealer Mark McDonald is presenting “Inside the Walls: Architects Design,” a survey of seminal furnishings from celebrated architects like Luis Barragán, Marcel Breuer, Frank Gehry, Charlotte Perriand, and Kenzo Tange. Many are unique custom designs for specific commissions, both residential and commercial. Crowning the gallery space are cantilevered light fixtures designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for his 1914 Francis W. Little House in Minnesota. Archival photographs show furnishings in situ.

Coffee table by Gio Ponti, 1955. Photography by Dan Kukla.
Cabinet No. 8 by Ettore Sottsass, 1994. Image courtesy of Friedman Benda.

For McDonald, this is a passion project. “My favorite furniture at home are pieces designed by architects,” says McDonald, who co-founded New York’s Fifty/50 Gallery, renowned for exhibiting the first-ever Eames retrospective. “Unhampered by the constraints of designing for manufacturing and mass-market appeal (or even for comfort), architects are at liberty to imagine something unique, perfectly suited for the function and space.”

Wanna Go There! partition and Where is this? bench by Andy and Dave, 2018. Image courtesy of Friedman Benda. 

Juan Garcia Mosqueda has always been drawn to architecture’s relationship with furniture. He founded Manhattan gallery Chamber, which championed contemporary independent design for three years. Although he shuttered the space last July, Mosqueda’s days as a curator are far from over. “No-Thing” showcases newly commissioned works from nine emerging architectural practices known for pushing boundaries. Through innovative use of materials and form, each piece calls into question our approach to interiors. For example, two rockers by Leong Leong—one in Gneiss stone, the other in perforated stainless steel—upend notions of mass. Objects like these, says Mosqueda, urge us “to take not solely a passive but an active role” at reimagining our relationship with domestic objects.

Light Rocker and Heavy Rocker by Leong Leong, 2018. Photography by Naho Kubota.
Kamer Frank daybed by architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, 2017. Image courtesy of Friedman Benda.

“Inside the Walls: Architects Design” and “No-Thing” both display until February 17. Friedman Benda is located at 515 West 26th Street in New York.

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14 of the Most Beautiful Buildings That Defy Gravity

Building: Museum of Tomorrow
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Architect: Santiago Calatrava
Fun fact: Completed in 2015, 1.4 million people visited the Museum of Tomorrow during its inaugural year, far exceeding the anticipated 450,000 visits. It is currently the most-visited museum in Brazil.

 

Photo: Getty Images

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Building: Takasugi-an (Tea house on the Tree)
Location: Chino, Nagano Prefecture, Japan
Architect: Terunobu Fujimori
Fun fact: The name Takasugi-an means, “a tea house [built] too high.”

Photo: Getty Images

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Building: Hypo Alpe-Adria Bank
Location: Udine, Italy
Architecture firm: Morphosis Architects
Fun fact: The architects tilted the entire building 14 degrees to the south so the upper floors naturally shade the lower floors of the building, thereby conserving energy.

 

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