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Tag Archives: Flos

New and Noteworthy: 7 Recent Awards, Retrospectives and Partnerships

From award recognitions to exhibition openings, we’ve rounded up the most important design news from the past several weeks.

1. Rottet Studio named AIA Houston’s 2019 Firm of the Year

Rottet Studio senior staff accepts the award. Photography by Mark Johnson.

Rottet Studio is on a roll! From revamping the New York Stock Exchange (which won a Best of Year award in 2018) to opening the Hotel Alessandra in Rottet’s hometown of Houston, the firm has shown its undeniable presence in the design world. Rottet Studio received the award in early April during the Celebrate Architecture Gala at the Lone Star Flight Museum. 

The bar at Bardot, Hotel Alessandra’s cocktail lounge, combines walnut, brass, and resin. Photography by Eric Laignel.

2. Michael Anastassiades exhibits “Things That Go Together” retrospective

Michael Anastassiades’s ‘Things That Go Together’ in partnership with Flos. Photography courtesy of Flos.

The Best of Year award-winning duo is back. Flos partnered with designer Michael Anastassiades for his 12-year retrospective at the Nicosia Municipal Arts Center in his hometown of Cyprus, Greece. The show’s content ranges from Anastassiades’s design process to his research and includes his collaborations with Flos. The exhibit will run through July 20th.

3. “Gorham Silver: Designing Brilliance 1850-1970” opens at RISD Museum

Circa ’70 Coffee and Tea Service by Donald H. Colflesh for Gorham Manufacturing Company, 1960. Silver with ebony and Formica. Photography courtesy of RISD Museum.

RISD Museum’s Elizabeth A. Williams curated 120 years of creations by American silver manufacturer Gorham. The collection ranges from 19th-century objets d’art to Cubist-inspired coffee service, all crafted with Gorham’s signature glistening metal. The exhibition runs from May 3rdto December 1st.

Cubic Coffee Service by Erik Magnussen for Gorham Manufacturing Company, 1927. Silver with gilding, ivory, and oxidized decoration. Photography courtesy of RISD Museum.
Egg Spoon by Gorham Manufacturing Company, 1879. Silver with gilding. Photography courtesy of RISD Museum.

4. Coalesse announces new design partners

The VerdantaTM line by Sagegreenlife is a collection of self-contained free-standing walls and partitions. Photography courtesy of Coalesse.

Workplace furnishings company Coalesse recently announced new partnerships with Sagegreenlife, Carl Hansen & Son, Viccarbe, and EMU. The four companies bring fresh ideas to the table, such as bioliphic partitions from Sagegreenlife, and Carl Hansen & Son’s legacy pieces by Hans Wegner.

Embrace Collection by Austrian design trio EOOS for Carl Hansen & Son. Photography courtesy of Coalesse.

5. Ressource now offers extensive design services

Ressource offers design services at its New York showroom. Photography courtesy of Resource.

French paint manufacturer Ressource has announced new color consulting, design, and special effects application services. These services open the door for Ressource to work closely with clients on customizing their projects.

6. Jerry Pair launches new website

Luxury furniture retailer Jerry Pair has entered the e-commerce sphere with a website refresh. The site offers 35,000 residential products including furniture, lighting, accessories, textiles, and wallcoverings.

7. Biomimicry Institute hosts annual design competition

Art imitates life—and so does design. The Biomimicry Global Design Challenge prompts designers to imagine nature-inspired solutions for urgent sustainability issues, this year’s theme being climate change. The competition is open to university students and professionals. Enter by May 8th to be considered.

Continue reading New and Noteworthy: 7 Recent Awards, Retrospectives and Partnerships

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On the Move: Recent Top Promotions and Hires

FLOS

Roberta Silva (pictured at left) has been named CEO of Flos. She was selected by the group’s shareholders together with Piero Gandini, the entrepreneur who sold Flos to Design Holding. As CEO, she will carry forward the brand’s history of excellence and guide the company into a new phase of growth.

York Wallcoverings

Vincent Santini has been named vice president and general manager of York Brands. He will oversee all sales and support for York’s residential and commercial businesses. The company, approaching its 125th year in 2020, hopes to grow its reach in over 85 countries.

WeWork

James Slade has joined the design team at WeWork as VP of architecture. He will work with SVP of architecture Michael Rojkind and chief architect Bjark Ingles on all ground-up projects. Slade co-founded Slade Architecture with his partner, Hayes Slade, in 2002, and has built projects in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Ware Malcomb

Joshua Thompson (pictured at right) has been promoted to studio manager, interior architecture and design in Ware Malcomb’s downtown San Diego office. He previously served as senior project manager for the past five years in the Phoenix office. He will lead Ware Malcomb’s interior architecture & design studio in San Diego and manage select projects.

R&A Architecture & Design

Culver City-based R&A Architecture & Design is rebranding their firm to OfficeUntitled and expanding the leadership team, made up of principals Christian Robert, Benjamin Anderson, Shawn Gehle and Lindsay Green. Recent projects include Woodlark Hotel in Portland, The Cayton Children’s Museum in Santa Monica, and the Harland in Beverly Hills.

The Switzer Group

Sabrina Pagani has joined The Switzer Group’s Manhattan team as principal. She will oversee a number of high-profile workplace interiors out of the nationally ranked interior architecture firm’s New York studio.

BDG Architecture + Design

BDG Architecture + Design is opening a new studio in New York, expanding into the North American market. BDG’s global chief creative officer, Colin Macgadie will provide creative direction for the studio. Kelly D. Powell and Rebecca Wu-Norman will be studio leads.

TRIO

Ericka Moody has joined TRIO as regional vice president. Moody is a 30-year veteran of the interior design industry and has overseen hundreds of successful national and international projects. TRIO has expanded its work in California significantly over the last several years and has recently completed dozens of projects, including work with Touchstone Communities, Shea Homes, and Simpson Property Group.

Perkins + Will

Maha Sabra has been promoted to associate principal in the New York studio of Perkins + Will in support of the healthcare practice. In the past five years at the studio, she has transitioned from a design practitioner to project manager. As a senior project manager, Sabra plays a central role leading the studio’s healthcare teams.

HOK

Kimberly Dowdell (pictured at right) has returned to HOK as director of business development in Chicago. Dowdell is a licensed architect with a wealth of expertise in strategic planning, design, project management, housing policy, and real estate development. She previously worked in HOK’s New York studio from 2008-2011.

Wilson Associates

Kathleen Lynch has joined the Dallas studio of Wilson Associates as operations director. Lynch has 15 years of professional experience as a LEED-accredited interior designer and field manager. She will oversee teams on a roster of hospitality projects in Nevada, California, and other areas across the Southwest.

WRNS Studio

Kevin Wilcock has joined WRNS Studio as associate principal. He brings 25 years experience leading affordable and market-rate housing projects. He will be based out of WRNS Studio’s Honolulu office, guiding the studio’s multi-family housing practice with a focus on the Pacific region.

Read more: On the Move: April’s Top Promotions and Hires

Continue reading On the Move: Recent Top Promotions and Hires

10 Questions With… Jasper Morrison

The Soft Modular sofa by Jasper Morrison for Vitra. Photography by Marc Eggimann.

“From a very young age, I understood that I had a kind of over-sensitivity to atmospheres,” admits Jasper Morrison. In his desire to influence them, the British designer has become one of the most successful industrial designers of the modern day. Emeco, Flos, Vitra, and Mattiazzi are among his high-profile clients, while the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museumand the Museum of Modern Art in New York are just two of the prominent museums around the world highlighting his work.

In Morrison’s latest collection, a limited-edition cork furniture series launching during NYCxDESIGN this week, faulty wine bottle corks rejected during the production process find new life. To present the collection, Morrison turned to gallery Kasmin in New York—a union which also celebrates a lifelong friendship. In 1970s England, the Chelsea gallery’s owner, Paul Kasmin, was a schoolmate. On view May 9 through June 29, “Corks” unveils Morrison’s first complete series in the material, with a chaise longue, chairs, stools, bookshelves, and a fireplace. Interior Design sat down with Morrison to hear more about the new cork collection, recent Milan launches, and what London restaurant personifies his design mentality with celeriac and a boiled egg.

Interior Design: Why cork?

Jasper Morrison: I have done a few things in cork before and came to understand what a great material it is, both to the touch and in terms of what it does for the atmosphere of a room. It is difficult to do anything big industrially with it, because the material cost is quite high, the machining cost higher, and it needs to be hand-finished—so it really only works for limited production.

ID: What’s the design concept behind the cork pieces?

JM: The process is rather sculptural as the pieces have to be machined out of large blocks of cork. It’s very different from designing things for mass production, which tends to be more about structure than volume. The concept is really just about finding good shapes to make each piece of furniture work well. The material suggests its own formal language, but you need to make sure there’s the right balance of softness and tension in the forms. The repurposed corks come from a producer in Portugal. The primary product produced by cork is still the wine bottle stopper, and they grind these up and form them into blocks under pressure with a glue. I’ve known about this material for many years and have used it for a few smaller pieces, which were economic enough to be made in quantities.

Read more: 10 Questions With… Bethan Gray

“Corks,” a series of limited-edition furniture by Jasper Morrison, on view at gallery Kasmin in New York. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.

ID: What else have you completed recently?

JM: Some new chairs as usual—at any one time I’m always working on at least four or five chairs. At Salone del Mobile this year, I presented a slightly sculptural solid wood chair called Fugu for the Japanese brand Maruni.

For Emeco, a company I have been working with very closely for the last five years or so, I did a cleaning-up job of a few of their heritage pieces—a chair, armchair, and swivel chairs from 1948 known as the Navy Officers collection. When I first saw them, I nicknamed them the ugly sisters. We really had to rework and fine-tune them to make them more appealing for today’s market. From the proportions and thicknesses of structure to upholstery detailing, they really came from another era, when things were done in a very different way. I guess they were made to last, but they were a bit over-the-top in terms of structure.

We also just completed a big collection of tableware called Raami for the Finnish brand Iittala.

ID: What’s upcoming for you?

JM: For Vitra, I have been working on a long-term project that is a quite technologically advanced chair. We hope to launch it in Milan 2020. We are also working on adding to the tableware collection we just finished for Iittala and on another chair for Emeco.

Read more: 15 Young Design Talents to Watch from Salone del Mobile

The Fugu chair by Jasper Morrison for Maruni. Photography courtesy of Maruni.

 

ID: How did your childhood influence your design thinking?

JM: When I was growing up in London in the early 1960s, the standard interior was very claustrophobic and quite gloomy, with a lot of curtains, upholstery, and sofas—everything was heavy and upholstered.

Then, at maybe four or five years old, I discovered this room my grandfather had made for himself. It was in England—but, while working for a Danish company, he had discovered the Scandinavian way of making interiors. I think he had quite a good eye, and the room was well-lit with lots of daylight, wooden floors, and just a few rugs. There was less upholstery and more lightweight seating, a record player by Dieter Rams from the German company Braun, and an open fire. Suddenly I just felt way better in that space, and realizing that there were some places that made me feel good and others that didn’t had a huge effect on me. I’m pretty sure I became a designer to have some influence on my surroundings and to generally improve atmospheres for others as well.

ID: In what kind of home do you live?

JM: I live in a few different homes, but mostly on the south coast of England with my wife and three children. These places are all furnished either with my own designs (for testing purposes) or with other designs I admire. I have a lot of Danish furniture, especially Børge Mogensen and Mogens Koch, but also pieces by Enzo Mari and Achille Castiglioni. There’s a Charlotte Perriand armchair which I got recently which I love. Right now, my Alfi chairs for Emeco are around my dining table. It’s an important learning process to live with things and assess how successful they are or not!

The Lepic kitchen by Jasper Morrison for Schiffini. Photography by Miro Zagnoli.

ID: Is there a person in the industry that you particularly admire?

JM: When Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec hit the scene, I remember describing their design language as like a new color—something you haven’t seen before, something you didn’t expect. They made a big impression on me and today they are still probably the designers I respect the most. Their vision is very individual and they have great design.

ID: Could you name an Instagram account you follow?

JM: There’s a funny little account that actually hardly anyone follows. It’s called @terencepoe and is by architect Terence Poe of Poe + Poe. I share an eye with him somehow and he actually posts a lot of my stuff as well. But that’s not why I’m following him! He posts things that are quite obscure but interesting, which I really like, which I may know and also think are great.

The Zampa stool by Jasper Morrison for Mattiazzi. Photography by Fabian Frinzel.

ID: What are you reading?

JM: “Hokusai: A Life in Drawing,” which is an illustrated introduction by Henri-Alexis Baatsch to the work of Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai, who is somebody I’ve been interested in for a long time. He did a lot of woodblock prints but he also did a lot of drawings, which I like as they’re very human. He just drew these kind of normal things, everyday stuff, and I admire that because that could not have been easy at that time. He was supposed to toe the line and do beautiful drawings of actors and actresses and set pieces, but he just did his own thing. They’re incredibly great drawings and there’s nothing old about them, they’re still very contemporary.

ID: Do you have a secret you can share?

JM: The St. John restaurant Smithfield Supper on St. John Street in Smithfield, London is hardly a secret, but I think they do with food exactly what I do with things. As an example, a French friend of mine went there for dinner and ordered a dish called Celeriac and Boiled Egg. When the plate arrived, it was just a plate of celeriac with a boiled egg on top—with its shell still on. My friend was outraged she had to do all the work, but for me that’s a fantastic example of what they do best. It’s really straightforward: What you order is what you get. That really matches my design philosophy.

Keep scrolling to see more of Jasper Morrison’s work >

The O Watt restaurant, with interior design by Jasper Morrison, in the historic EDP building in Lisbon, Portugal. Photography by Francisco Rivotti.
“Corks,” a series of limited-edition furniture by Jasper Morrison, on view at gallery Kasmin in New York. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.
The Zampa stool by Jasper Morrison for Mattiazzi. Photography by Fabian Frinzel.
The T&O table by Jasper Morrison for Maruni. Photography courtesy of Maruni.
The Superloon adjustable LED panel light by Jasper Morrison for Flos. Photography by Jasper Morrison Studio.
The Palma cast iron cookware set by Jasper Morrison for Oigen. Photography courtesy of Jasper Morrison Studio.
The 2 Inch aluminum table by Jasper Morrison for Emeco. Photography by Miro Zagnoli.
The Navy Officer chair series with an update by Jasper Morrison for Emeco. Photography courtesy of Emeco.

Read more: 10 Questions With… Philippe Starck

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