Advertisements

Tag Archives: farrow & ball

A guide to paint sheens, from glossy to matte

Yas sheen yas (but also, in some cases, no)

Sam Frost

So you’ve done the hard part—after much debate you’ve finally settled on a paint color. Now, the merchant wants to know what sheen you want and there are so many choices. We asked artist Mary McMurray to help us sift through the options.

For the past thirty years, Murray has run her own color consulting business, called Art First Colors for Architecture, in Portland, Oregon. Her unique perspective—she’s an artist and also became a licensed painting contractor in order to mix her own colors—makes her an authority on the medium. Here’s a cheat sheet for choosing the right paint sheens.

1. In general, there is a sheen scale

The first thing to know is that sheens typically exist on a scale, usually from flat (no shine) to glossy (ultra-shiny), with steps in between. According to McMurray, a loose sheen scale that accelerates in shine quality looks like this: flat > matte > eggshell > satin > semi-gloss > gloss or high-gloss.

handbook-widget

The sheen designations can be a little confusing at times because each paint manufacturer coins their own. For instance, at Benjamin Moore, satin is also referred to as Pearl. At Farrow & Ball, sheens are referred to as emulsions. In general, however, a scale will exist.

2. Shine tends to equal durability

The general rule for matching a paint sheen to the room is this: The higher the shine level of the paint, the more durable it will be. This means different sheens are appropriate to different areas of the home, depending on their activity level.

There can be exceptions to this, thanks to modern developments in paint formulation. For instance, Sherwin-Williams now makes a line of flat paint called Emerald that they advertise as having the same “washability and durability as the matte or glossier sheens.”

3. Low sheen for low traffic rooms

The lower end of the spectrum, that being the flat and matte sheens, are typically used for low-traffic rooms since the finish is susceptible to marks and stains that don’t easily wipe off. This makes these finishes good for places like adult bedrooms or home offices—as opposed to kid’s rooms where there is more activity.

When picking a flat sheen for a wall, McMurray suggests using the highest quality paint possible, as it will be more durable in the long run. “If you do happen to get a handprint on a flat-finished wall that you used a cheap paint on, and you try to wipe it off, it’s probably going to destroy the finish,” she says.

4. Higher sheen for high traffic or moisture-prone rooms

Since higher shine equals higher durability, use an eggshell, satin, or semi-gloss in the bathroom, kitchen, hallways, and kid’s rooms. This ensures that constant exposure to moisture doesn’t affect the finish and impromptu stains or scuffs can be cleaned off the walls easily with a sponge and cleaner.

In the bathroom and kitchen, make sure to extend the same sheen to the ceiling that’s being used on the walls. “In the kitchen, it depends on what kind of cooking you do and how much ventilation you have,” says McMurray. Some people might be able to do a matte finish in a kitchen but a safer bet would be eggshell or higher, for ease of wiping down splatters.

5. Highest sheen on trim and doors

Baseboards, doors, and trim are probably the hardest hit surfaces in your house. For that reason, opting for satin or semi-gloss will protect them. “For trimwork, I like satin or semi-gloss depending on what the project is,” says McMurray. The higher sheen will highlight the architectural features and allow them to contrast with the body of the wall surface nicely, while also surviving nicks and scrapes better.

Just be aware that higher sheen paints are thinner in consistency, and can be harder to work with and control for a smooth finish (depending on your painting skills, of course). For this reason, self-leveling paints, like Benjamin Moore’s Advance line, are extremely helpful. McMurray does not often specify a gloss or high-gloss finish, except for the occasional client who wants a standout front door.

6. Consider the overall effect in the room

In addition to selecting a sheen for its function, McMurray cautions people to also be aware of how it will look in a room. Consider the wall surface quality as well as the sheen’s overall effect. Lower sheen paints will soak up more light rather than reflecting it, which is good if there is imperfections in your wall surface that need to be hidden. Shinier paints will reflect light and draw attention to bumps and divots in drywall or plaster.

The latter can be “very distracting,” says McMurray. “I like flat finishes on the ceiling, partly because that doesn’t offer any distraction with light bouncing off the surface and it creates a calmer effect,” she says.

Noise amplification is also something to consider. “If you painted a whole room in semi-gloss, the light would feel very noisy,” says McMurray. “You would get a lot of glare reflected and it wouldn’t be a very calm and peaceful environment.” She has read studies wherein it was discovered that audible noise increases with the degrees of sheen.

7. For the exterior, go more matte

Exterior paint has a similar range of sheens, yet here McMurray cautions against painting your whole house satin, even if the logic is that the shinier finish will stand up better to the weather and elements. “Then your house looks kind-of like a big plastic box,” she says. “So I would not recommend satin on the siding.” Instead, save satin for the exterior trim and paint the body of your house flat or “low-lustre.”

Looking for the perfect shade of white paint? We’ve got you. And check out all our advice for painting your home here.

Continue reading A guide to paint sheens, from glossy to matte

Advertisements

35 BEST GREY PAINTS ACCORDING TO TOP INTERIOR DESIGNERS

From calming pale colors to edgier dark tones, top talent keeps coming back to these sleek shades.

image

Douglas Friedman

Grey is the cooler, chicer cousin of white that we can’t stop lusting after. The neutral color can create a calming, elegant or even electrifying effect, making it the perfect option for any decor and personal style. Grey paints come in an array of hues, from subtle pale shades to deep rich pigments.

Here, designers share their favorite shades of grey for stunning interiors.

SILVER BLADE, FINE PAINTS OF EUROPE
best grey paints

Fine Paints of Europe

“To me, Silver Blade by Fine Paints of Europe is a rich, elegant and classic gray that elevates any room. It contrasts beautifully with light and dark colors as well as all textures. Always welcoming you in.” – Raquel Garcia
SHOP

PURBECK STONE, FARROW & BALL
best grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“A lovely warm neutral that enriches the space, and looks amazing with any wood floor stain. I love this color because of its versatility, and can be used in both formal and casual settings. The color is always pleasing to the eye.” – Amanda Sacy
SHOP

CORNFORTH WHITE, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“This is a perfect tone of grey. It catches light beautifully. It’s subtle and very chic. It is the perfect complement to any other neutral.” – Nicole Fuller
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
MOLE’S BREATH, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“This rich, warm gray is the perfect neutral when you want to create depth in a space. It works equally well in small spaces to cozy them up, as well as large rooms to make them feel inviting. I also love it as a trim color to add sophisticated glamour to your millwork and moldings. A kiss from a Mole never seemed sweeter!” – Donna Mondi
SHOP

PLUMBAGO GRAY, FIRED EARTH
grey paints

Fired Earth

“This rich shade has warm blue undertones, which makes one feel right at home. It’s sophisticated tone makes any space feel chic.” – Birgit Klein
SHOP

GRAY OWL, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“This fabulous gray reminds me of French porcelain — cool with a slight hint of green. Great for morning light! Try it in a white kitchen to lacquer barstools and pop them with shades of buttercup.” – Christine Markatos Lowe
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
GRAYTINT, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“This is the perfect whisper of grey to add to a room where you want a crisp, tailored look but something more than white or ivory. It provides a lovely soft highlight to decorative trim in traditional settings, and is cool enough to provide a modern edge to more contemporary interiors.” – Emilie Munroe
SHOP

CHARLESTON GRAY, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“Hands down my favorite gray paint is Charleston Gray by Farrow & Ball. It’s a deep, sumptuous shade of gray that wraps you like a velvety fog. I use it when I’m trying to create intimacy in an oversized space, or warmth in small room with little natural light.” – Patrick Ediger
SHOP

PANTONE CHARCOAL GRAY, VALSPAR PAINT
grey paints

Valspar Paint

“A perfect backdrop for art collectors and enthusiasts. This grey sets a bold tone and pairs beautifully in a monochromatic setting or one with a stark contrast. I’m a firm believer in giving a big impression in a subtle way and this grey never falls flat.” – Becky Shea
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
ARTIST GREY, RALPH LAUREN
grey paints

Ralph Lauren Home

“This color is true to Ralph Lauren. It is a chameleon color in the sense that it works with many different tones of grey and blue.” – Robin Strickler
SHOP

CITY SHADOW, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“For millwork and cabinetry, I frequently come back to Benjamin Moore’s City Shadow. The color is bold and dynamic, while maintaining a warmth and softness that many dark grey’s can lack.” – Katie Hackworth
SHOP

GRAY CASHMERE, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

American Artist/Benjamin Moore

“For me, this is a no-fail selection. I’ve used it in bathrooms, kitchens, garden rooms, and bedrooms – all with beautiful results. It has the perfect amount of blue saturation to pair with bronze, green, periwinkle, or even spice. I prefer it EXTRA glossy on paneling!” – Meredith Ellis
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
SILVER CHAIN #BM1472, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

American Artist/Benjamin Moore

“It is soft and works well in both traditional and modern rooms. I recently used it on the cabinetry of a townhouse kitchen with countertops in super white quartzite.” – Mark Cunningham
SHOP

PASSIVE, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
grey paints

American Artist/Sherwin Williams

“This is a light airy grey that enhances architecture with subtle shadows, but doesn’t become too heavy or drab…A happy grey! I love it for bathrooms, kitchens or bedrooms.” – Jeff Andrews
SHOP

GUGGENHEIM COLOR G042, FINE PAINTS OF EUROPE
grey paints

American Artist/Fine Paints Of Europe

“As an avid art collector, this gray in their Eurolux Interior Matte, is the perfect backdrop for any collection. The matte finish absorbs natural and artificial light allowing the space to come alive with undertones that appear to make the walls gradually change throughout the day. Very alluring!” – Patrick Planeta of Planeta Design Group
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
AGREEABLE GRAY, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s faint enough to be a neutral, but saturated enough to make a difference.” – J. Randall Powers
SHOP

AMMONITE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s the perfect neutral and a great alternative to off-white. I recently painted a wood paneled room this color, and the overall effect was warm and inviting.” – CeCe Barfield Thompson
SHOP

CHEATING HEART, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“The biggest fear to overcome when using a dark color is that it will make your room feel smaller. Not true! A dark color makes the walls seem to disappear and adds incredible drama to a room. This charcoal has just the right amount of brown in it to add warmth. It’s as gorgeous on walls as it is on millwork and trim. I’ve even used it on the bottom of a claw foot tub.” – Jen Going
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
CHELSEA GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I use this shade over and over again on cabinets and vanities because it is the perfect medium-dark gray. It has warmth, but never looks brown, and has enough pigment to make a statement without shouting. Such a classic!” – Erin Gates
SHOP

CLOUD, DUNN-EDWARDS PAINT
image

Megan Tatem

“It feels soft and airy, but is still saturated enough to make an impact and elevate a space. It’s incredibly versatile, working in anything from traditional to modern spaces, and pretty much everything in between. I love it paired with white for a crisp, clean contrast, and with dark charcoal for more dramatic feel.” – Jessica McClendon
SHOP

CONFORTH WHITE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This pale gray paint has a touch of taupe/lavender that provides a wonderful neutral backdrop to both traditional and modern interiors. I love how the color evolves over the day: cooler earlier in the day and a bit more moody at night.” – Grant Gibson
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
DOWN PIPE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s such a beautiful shade that works with a mixture of tones and finishes. The color has a deep richness that doesn’t fall flat and can give a space a great punch, especially when paired with light colors for high contrast.” – Shannon Wollack & Brittany Zwickl of Studio Life.Style
SHOP

ELEPHANT’S BREATH, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This warm and luxuriant shade is stunning in a room with white woodwork and crystal chandeliers. Pop it with coral or hot pink.” – Dana Gibson
SHOP

GRAY OWL, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“This gray is super classic and sophisticated, but not boring AT ALL. It’s a very, very warm gray – meaning that it’s still a cool tone, but has more yellow in it than blue.” – Emily Henderson
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
HORIZON GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I like that it is light and airy. It is a whisper of barely there color. This gray doesn’t go green, blue or lavender. It is a perfect neutral backdrop!” – Summer Thornton
SHOP

IRON MOUNTAIN, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I look for dimension within paint colors, something that shifts a little from day to night. I love the subtle depth and warm brown underpinning of this shade. This deep, dark gray is beautiful in a matte wall finish, stunning in satin for millwork, or easily pulls off sexy in a gorgeous gloss for furniture and cabinetry.” – Drew McGukin
SHOP

LAMP ROOM GRAY, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This shade of gray is pretty because it has a little taupe in it that makes it very chic. It can be beautiful in a living room, dining room, or bedroom.” – Alex Papachristidis
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
MODERN GRAY, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
image

Megan Tatem

“This is the ideal background color: warm, soft, and plays well with everyone. It’s like the consummate party hostess who brings out the best in every guest. It’s the perfect backdrop for blues (denim, chambray, navy) in a living room, and makes olive green look fantastic. It can handle fuchsia and orange in a bunk room, but also goes beautifully soft with creams and grays when used in a master bedroom or kitchen.” – Allison Bloom
SHOP

PASHMINA, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s a rich, warm gray that creates an inviting, intimate space. It’s also a perfect exterior color paired with a dark charcoal trim.” – Karen Vidal
SHOP

REVERE PEWTER, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I keep coming back to this paint color again and again. It’s warm enough to use in a space with little sunlight, but not too warm to be considered “greige.” It looks soft and rich without overtaking the room.” – Amanda Reynal
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
RODEO, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It has the right mix of warm and cool undertones to be a true gray. It has just enough brown to achieve that perfect warm gray. It looks beautiful on walls, trim, paneling and cabinetry – use it everywhere!” – Wendy Labrum
SHOP

SLEIGH BELLS, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“This color is warm without being muddy, and it has just the perfect amount of pigment – dark enough to be sophisticated and crisp, light enough to be bright and airy.” – Orlando Soria for Homepolish
SHOP

STONINGTON GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I’ve found that this hue looks pure and fresh at any time of day or in any type of space. It’s not too dark, not too light…it’s just right.” – Caitlin Murray
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
WHISPER, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s a super soft and subtle shade of gray that feels fresh, light and airy. It reflects light beautifully to really open up a space, and serves as the perfect neutral backdrop.” – Nicole Gibbons
SHOP

WINTER’S GATE, PRATT & LAMBERT
image

Megan Tatem

“This color has the ideal hint of color for homeowners that may be too shy to jump out of their beige comfort zone. It’s light enough to read as a neutral and is a beautiful balance for bright white trim. It’s ultra versatile on ceilings, as it complements both light and dark wall colors.” – James Wheeler
SHOP

WATCH NEXT

Meghan Markle’s Bridal Style Is All The Buzz

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Interior Design Risks Worth Taking

The architect David Neff designed a new 4,500-square-foot home for his parents in Quogue, N.Y., where he used highly patterned cement tiles for their bold graphics.CreditCredit Daniel Gonzalez for The New York Times

It’s tempting to play it safe when it comes to decorating. That butterfly-print wallpaper is appealing, but it isn’t cheap, and you may hate it once it’s up on the wall. Whereas, beige paint — who could object to that?

But playing with color, pattern and styles is the easiest way to inject some personality into your home. If you’re nervous about it, designers say, start small: Focus on a contained space like a powder room, a stairwell, a single wall in a bedroom or a kitchen backsplash, or use bold accessories like pillows that can be changed later.

A Murphy bed, when open shows a black-and-white tree motif, a subtle surprise.Credit Linda Jaquez for The New York Times
Image
A Murphy bed, when open shows a black-and-white tree motif, a subtle surprise.Credit Linda Jaquez for The New York Times

WALLPAPER UNEXPECTED PLACES After opening up her kitchen to the living area in her SoHo apartment, Danielle Nazinitsky, a saleswoman with the Corcoran Group, was looking for a way to define the two spaces now that the wall was gone. Her contractor suggested wallpapering the kitchen ceiling. Ms. Nazinitsky, 31, picked up three rolls of the gray-and-white Tessella print from Farrow & Ball for about $230 a roll. That was the easy part; installing it proved trickier.

“The ceiling was not level, so the wallpaper didn’t line up,” said Ms. Nazinitsky, who writes a blog called SohoStrut. “We actually needed to get another roll to try and line it up.” Despite that, she was pleased with the result: “It added a small touch to a pretty standard stainless-steel kitchen with white cabinets.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Recently, she encountered another example of wallpaper used in an untraditional way: hidden inside a closet that housed a Murphy bed, at a Gramercy-area listing she represented. (The home was featured in the On the Market column in January and is now in contract.) When the Murphy bed is open, the black-and-white tree motif is a subtle surprise, adding interest to an otherwise typical room.

Liza Sandler, a former cast member of Bravo’s “Secrets and Wives,” had a second bedroom in her three-bedroom apartment in a building on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, livened up with pale lavender walls.Credit Robert Granoff
Image

Liza Sandler, a former cast member of Bravo’s “Secrets and Wives,” had a second bedroom in her three-bedroom apartment in a building on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, livened up with pale lavender walls. CreditRobert Granoff

ADD COLOR After Liza Sandler, a former cast member of Bravo’s “Secrets and Wives,” moved from a large, traditional house in Old Westbury, N.Y., to a three-bedroom apartment in a modern glass-and-steel building on the Upper East Side, she hired Rona Landman, a Manhattan interior designer, to remake the space. Working in a style she described as “Hollywood glam,” Ms. Landman used dark paint on the walls and “bold bursts of saturated colors” throughout the apartment.

You have 2 free articles remaining.

Subscribe to The Times

Because Ms. Sandler was used to “a much more neutral palette,” Ms. Landman said, she tested various colors on the walls and then painted the halls first, to give Ms. Sandler time to get used to the charcoal gray paint color she chose for the living and dining area. To complement the dark color, she added fuchsia throw pillows, a coffee table with a hot-pink base and bright accent walls — orange in the den and pale lavender in one of the bedrooms. “The chairs and the couch are all neutral, but we brought in color in the art and in one or two walls and with pillows and accents,” she said. “You can take the pillows away and go back, if you really want to.”

Megan Hopp, an interior designer with Homepolish, used abstract custom wallpaper with a cosmic theme in lavender and silver hues to help infuse a small plain bedroom with character in an East Village one bedroom she decorated for a client last year.Credit Nick Glimenakis for Homepolish
Image

Megan Hopp, an interior designer with Homepolish, used abstract custom wallpaper with a cosmic theme in lavender and silver hues to help infuse a small plain bedroom with character in an East Village one bedroom she decorated for a client last year.Credit Nick Glimenakis for Homepolish

GO WILD ON ONE WALL Megan Hopp, an interior designer with Homepolish, used abstract custom wallpaper with a cosmic theme in lavender and silver to enliven a small, plain bedroom in an East Village apartment she decorated for a client last year. Everything was white, and there wasn’t much to it,” she said. “We wanted the master bedroom to feel like a real oasis, and when we made the choice to go with the — well, galactic, I suppose you might call it — wallpaper, it really turned into a retreat from planet Earth!”

The print, a metallic wash from Calico Wallpaper’s Andromeda collection, takes up two walls in the bedroom and cost about $4,000. “It was a big price tag, but we all agreed that it really is a work of art on its own,” Ms. Hopp said. “We kept every other piece really neutral — no pattern, no color, nothing, an absolutely clean canvas — so as to let this glorious paper do its thing.”

She added: “We wanted to strike a balance in the room between totally bold and absolutely serene. Had we papered the entire room, I think the cosmic elements would have taken us on some sort of trip to outer space.”

When Jade-Snow Carroll and Ian Rasch redesigned their home in Hillsdale, N.Y. in 2015, they used cement tiles from Clé in a hex medley pattern of different hues of gray behind the sink and stove.Credit Richard Powers

Image

When Jade-Snow Carroll and Ian Rasch redesigned their home in Hillsdale, N.Y. in 2015, they used cement tiles from Clé in a hex medley pattern of different hues of gray behind the sink and stove.CreditRichard Powers

PLAY WITH PATTERNED TILE Encaustic cement tile, which has been gaining popularity, is another good way to add graphic interest to a room. When Jade-Snow Carroll, a graphic designer, and Ian Rasch, a co-owner of Alander Construction, a construction and design-build company, redesigned their home in Hillsdale, N.Y., in 2015, they used cement tiles from Clé in a hex medley pattern (about $15 a square foot) behind the sink and stove; the eye-catching backsplash has a strong impact against the whitewashed floors and Baltic birch plywood cabinets. And in a small upstairs bathroom, they installed geometric floor tiles from Clé. “We chose a light gray, to add an element of interest,” Ms. Carroll said, “but to still keep it nice and light.” They were also careful to balance the bold pattern with neutral subway tile on the walls.

Lindsay Chambers, an interior designer in West Hollywood, Calif., used four rolls of Hygge & West’s Daydream wallpaper, which features orange birds and gray clouds on an off-white background, to reinvent her home office.Credit Lu Tapp

Image

Lindsay Chambers, an interior designer in West Hollywood, Calif., used four rolls of Hygge & West’s Daydream wallpaper, which features orange birds and gray clouds on an off-white background, to reinvent her home office.CreditLu Tapp

TRY AN ATTENTION-GRABBING PRINT “Bold wallpaper is such an easy way to completely transform a space quickly,” said Lindsay Chambers, an interior designer in West Hollywood, Calif., who used graphic paper in her home office. “It was a tight space to begin with, and it was dull and uninviting,” she said. “When I worked from home, I ended up working at the dining room table rather than in the office.” She added, “I had to do something bold to wake up the small space.”

Four rolls of Hygge & West’s Daydream wallpaper with its striking orange birds did the trick. A painting by Kelly Reemtsen of a woman in high heels standing on an office chair (which she already owned) and an $89 lumbar pillow from Room & Board pulled everything together. Because Ms. Chambers used art and furnishings she had on hand (including her desk and office chair), she was able to keep the total cost of labor and materials low: just $1,149 (including the wallpaper, at $165 a roll). It’s an investment, she said, that has paid off: “I now spend all my time in the space when I work from home.”

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page RE6 of the New York edition with the headline: Design Risks Worth Taking. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

The Best White Paints According To Interior Designers!

INTERIOR DESIGNERS

White paint can make or break a room. Here’s what you need to know about the best shades.

jae joo

Julia Robbs

When it comes to white paint, there are a slew of timeless hues to choose from. Since finding the right shade can be a daunting task, we checked in with some of our favorite interior designers to find out their go-to white paint colors for just about every room.

Chalk White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“My favorite white paint color is Benjamin Moore 2126-70. It is appropriately named Chalk White–a grey scale white, which works universally juxtaposed with cool and warm tones. I use this color for paint, stain finishes, custom color reverse painted glass and metal as a foil contrasting with other elements. Almost every paint schedule our firm issues includes this shade of white.” – Katherine Newman

BUY NOW

Snow Leopard, Portola

white paint
Portola

“My favorite choice for white is Snow Leopard by Portola. I am always in search of a white color with depth, but without other discernible tints. This color creates a beautiful backdrop for both modern and traditional projects. Best of all, it is truly white when it’s up but creates a beautiful, warm environment.” – Kazuko Hoshino

BUY NOW

Navajo White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“Think melted vanilla ice cream. Its cream undertone makes it the perfect white for a country house and warm, naturally-lit spaces. You can do a whole room in Navajo White and it stands alone and gives it a soul.” – Alexandra Champalimaud

BUY NOW

Intense White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“One of the best interior white paints is Benjamin Moore’s Intense White OC-51. It’s a warm white that has a light taupe undertone. The universal shade works well in a traditional or modern aesthetic. It’s the perfect hue for a bedroom, entertaining space or home office where the mood calls for a sophisticated and intimate environment.” – Kesha Franklin

BUY NOW

Strong White, Farrow & Ball

white paint
Farrow & Ball

“We use Strong White from Farrow & Ball, because it is the most neutral white but has a milky quality to it. It does not have pink or yellow undertones, and it also has a softness and depth that is needed in a true white.” – Caroline Grant and Dolores Suarez, Dekar Design

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“The most universal paint color I’ve used is Chantilly Lace by Benjamin Moore. I find myself going back to it again and again in order to create a bright white space that is warm and welcoming rather than sterile and cold. In a sea of whites, this is my tried and true!” – Nicole Davis

BUY NOW

Bancroft White DC-01, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“Why: Consistent, transitional across many styles and clean. We love its ability to translate to base moldings, door trims, doors and ceilings so seamlessly no matter the aesthetic—modern, rustic or traditional. It just works.” – Becky Shea

BUY NOW

Whisper, Dunn-Edwards

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
best white paints
Dunn-Edwards

“I must admit I have a sore spot for colors with whimsical names. This one especially ‘whispered’ to me when I was looking to paint my entire office and showroom in Guadalajara. This color is a very calm, soothing tone that mimics the shade of white found in nature. I love it because it’s primitive but very organic.” – Erick Millan

BUY NOW

White Dove, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“White Dove has a creamy undertone that brings a lovely warmth to homes in urban environments or those in climates that often experience grey and overcast skies. Meanwhile, in more traditional settings, White Dove reads as a crisp white without being too cold or modern.” – Emilie Munroe

“I love to use White Dove by Benjamin Moore. It’s so versatile! Because I focus a lot on art and artists in my work, this color never fights with sculptures, street art or abstracts. My favorite thing to do is apply one coat of Wise Owl’s Opalescent Pearl Glaze over the White Dove. It softly shimmers with directional lighting, and the walls ‘slow dance’ without fighting with the art, fabrics and rugs. It’s clean, simple and timeless!” – Kari Whitman

BUY NOW

Design Studio White, Ralph Lauren

best white paints
Ralph Lauren

“White seems to be a simple color. However, it has many shades. I like Design Studio White by Ralph Lauren because it’s a white wash with no yellow and cream tones. It’s a fantastic option for a home.” – Todd Amirian

BUY NOW

Cloud White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“Cloud White by Benjamin Moore is ethereal and soft. It is a timeless shade of white that works to either modernize or pare down a space without making it seem too sterile.” – Anne Hepfer

BUY NOW

Extra White, Sherwin-Williams

best white paints
Sherwin-Williams

“This color is crisp and clean, but not too stark. It complements all different interiors.” – Robin Strickler

BUY NOW

Dune White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“I am currently having a love affair with Benjamin Moore’s Dune White. I veer away from whites that are too clear and absent of pigment. I like the knocked-down elements of Dune White. It’s a warm, flattering color inside and outside. I tell my clients it’s a true white with the dimmer switch dialed down.” – Janie Molster

BUY NOW

Wevet No.273, Farrow & Ball

best white paints
Farrow & Ball
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“I love a good white with plenty of depth. Wevet by Farrow & Ball is one of my favorites for this reason. It has a beautiful hue of gray. It always looks brilliant and has great contrast that goes with many of my other favorites as well as looking beautiful on its own.” – Raquel Garcia

BUY NOW

Super White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love super white. I find it’s the cleanest and crispest and ALWAYS brightens my spaces. It’s too cool for some people’s preferences. For me, it’s spot on!” – Tali Roth

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“It feels clean and bright without being cold or ‘dormy’.” – Melanie Burnstin

BUY NOW

Crisp Linen, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“When it comes to white paint, I always prefer a warm undertone versus cool. Simply White by Benjamin Moore is my go-to, and for a slightly more historical lived-in feel, I warm it up a bit with Crisp Linen, also from Benjamin Moore.” – Katie Hackworth

BUY NOW

Calm, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“What could be more appropriate in one’s bedroom retreat than the feeling of calm, promoting quiet, reflective and relaxing moments?” – Dayna Dabek

Simply White, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
American Artist

“Benjamin Moore Simply White is my go-to for a kitchen. It just feels right–not too cool, not too warm.” – Victoria Hagan

“Benjamin Moore Natura Simply White has a slight warm undertone, which keeps it from feeling too sterile (no hospital vibes here). I have yet to come across a color scheme Simply White wouldn’t complement. It also really goes to work in those darker spaces with little to no natural light because the paint color itself simply radiates. Bonus, this is an eco-friendly zero VOC paint for the environmentally conscious!” – Meridith Baer

BUY NOW

White Diamond, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
American Artist
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“My old living room was painted this super cool white and I loved it for the space. I loved it because generally I’m more attracted to cool tones rather than warm tones. If you put it up to a true white, it looked a little blue. But in person, it just looked really white. So if you are looking for the perfect cool white, then this is a great option for you, as it doesn’t have any yellow or cream tones in it.” – Emily Henderson

BUY NOW

China White, Pratt & Lambert

best white paints
American Artist

“I just painted my apartment China White by Pratt & Lambert. It is NOT the same as the one by Benjamin Moore. It’s really pretty and has become one of my new favorites. It’s a warm white that has just the right amount of grey in it to make it feel fresh and not too stark.” – Shawn Henderson

BUY NOW

China White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It seldom fails me, no matter where in the country I use it. It doesn’t break green or pink. When held up against pure white, it has an off-white or greige appearance, but on its own, it holds up as true white—but with a little more body.” – Eric Cohler

BUY NOW

All White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s like a good friend. Easy to be around, dependable and it makes you and all the things around you look terrific. It stays consistent in any light, but in the afternoon, it can really make a room feel like it’s glowing.” – Brad Ford

BUY NOW

Cotton, C2 Paint

white paints
Megan Tatem

“White is not a shy color—it makes everything placed in its path come forward. And Cotton by C2 is the softest of whites, with a touch of yellow as its undertone. It’s the perfect backdrop to enhance wood and I especially love it in bedrooms. It makes skin sparkle.” – Elizabeth Martin

BUY NOW

Honeymilk, Valspar

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Getting white paint right can be a daunting proposition. Your best bet is a kinder, warmer white that has just a hint of grey or beige in it. Honeymilk is a soft white that’s great for walls. I’ve used it in a gazillion rooms and have never been disappointed.” – Elaine Griffin

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

BUY NOW

Lily of the Valley, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I found this color more than 20 years ago when I wanted a really great, warm white for trim, and it has been my standby ever since. It works well in rooms that get a lot of light and also in those that need it.” – Alessandra Branca

BUY NOW

Great White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s a white with character, and it’s anything but sterile. Great White works best in natural light, particularly in the morning when fresh, warm tones peek in. Throughout the day, it changes color ever so slightly—from white to not-quite-grey.” – Kara Mann

BUY NOW

Decorator’s White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love this white for ceilings and woodwork, or in any room where I want a bright, clean white. It works well in all applications and with every kind of light source. Some whites can be cold and slightly blue, while others can have a creamy, yellow tone, but Decorator’s White is a true white that is both warm and modern.” – Jeff Andrews

“Nothing beats a clean crisp white wall and my go-to is Benjamin Moore Decorator’s White. It is crisp and slightly cool, making it the the perfect backdrop to pop other colors used within a room.” – Ohara Davies-Gaetano

BUY NOW

Paper White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I use Paper White in kitchens and bathrooms because it melds the greys of Carrara marble and the stark white of sinks and toilets.” – Katie Ridder

BUY NOW

Pointing, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“This is the perfect ivory for almost every setting—not too bright and not too creamy. We’re all about striking that balance. It’s proven itself in both a sun-drenched farmhouse living room and a one-windowed New York City bedroom.” – Anne Maxwell Foster and Suysel dePedro Cunningham of Tilton Fenwick

BUY NOW

White Wisp, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“It’s a tinted white with a hint of grey-green, but it reads as bright white. I like to use it on the trim for cool-colored walls. I use quite a bit of wall coverings in hemp cloth and other natural materials. White Wisp as a trim makes many of these papers look crisp.” – Frank Roop

BUY NOW

Huntington White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I discovered my favorite, Huntington White, through much trial and error while working on my line of paint for Benjamin Moore. It’s pleasingly chameleon-like. It saturates and radiates consistently, where many whites are inconsistent and change appearance during different times of day.” – Darryl Carter

BUY NOW

Super White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s the most pure expression of white with no color undertones. It reminds me of the galleries at the Gagosian Gallery. What I love about this color is that it makes your furnishings stand out like a piece of art.” – Jon Call

BUY NOW

Wimborne White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“What I love about the Farrow & Ball Wimborne White is that it is a beautiful shade of white that has depth and dimension. Using it in high-gloss achieves a very chic and modern look without using a real lacquer.” – Suzanne Kasler

BUY NOW

Winter Orchard, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love Winter Orchard because it has a super subtle tinge of grey in it, so it works with every color.” – Taniya Nayak

BUY NOW

Swiss Coffee, Dunn Edwards

white paints
Megan Tatem

“There should be one cozy room, such as the living room, in every home. In this type of space, I like to use white paint as the backdrop for an amazing collection of art, which brings a pop of color. For me, the perfect shade of white, like this one from Dunn Edwards, isn’t too yellow or too pink.” – Trip Haenisch

BUY NOW

Slipper Satin, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“Slipper Satin is my go to for ‘fleshing up’ more traditional rooms, as it is calming and gives a sense of ease and serenity. It is inviting and cozy, yet also works well on more architectural houses punctuating the accoutrements.” – Jeffrey Alan Marks

BUY NOW

Historic White, Dunn Edwards

white paints
Megan Tatem

“The classic warm white complements any interior then, now and forever. Ultra-premium paint from the DE Everest collection gives clients low-odor, zero-VOC finishes that are durable and contribute to good indoor air quality.” – Sarah Barnard

BUY NOW

Acadia White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Acadia White by Benjamin Moore is my go-to Goldilocks. Not too warm, not too cool, but just right. It’s the perfect creamy off-white.” – Patrick Ediger

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Lace is crisp and bright while having enough depth to avoid a sterile look. It’s a white on the cold side, but able to bring in warm tones as well—excellent used where modern and traditional meet.” – Moises Esquenazi

BUY NOW

WATCH NEXT

Meghan Markle’s Bridal Style Is All The Buzz

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Inside the 2018 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

“The Moonlight Room” by Juan Montoya Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.

Each year, celebrated designers transform a luxury Manhattan residence into the Kips Bay Decorator Show House, an elaborate exhibition of fine furnishings, art, and technology. This year’s iteration, open May 1-31, is no different. Designers went all out: Juan Montoya Design evokes the cosmos via abstract silhouettes of the moon in both carpeting and wall covering, while Barbara Ostrom Associates transports guests to an avid art collector’s library, crowned by a ceiling inspired by Frank Stella paintings. This year’s pièce de résistance, however, is the grand staircase, Sasha Bikoff’s technicolor ode to past, present, and future. Memphis Milano designers Ettore Sottsass and Alessandro Mendini influenced Bikoff, who included colorful pieces by Chris Schanck and Misha Kahn. It’s a feast for the eyes—and Instagram.

“The Afterparty” by B.A. Torrey. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
“Art and A La Carte” by Barbara Ostrom Associates. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
“Gilded Knots” by Bunny Williams Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
“Diana’s Stair” by Dan Fink. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
David Netto Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Drake | Anderson. Photography by Marco Ricca.
“The Moonlight Room” by Juan Montoya Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Katie Ridder Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Marcia Tucker Interiors. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Garden terrace by Nievera Williams Designs. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
“Home Wellness Retreat, for Mind, Body, and Spirit” by Pavarini Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
“The Drawing Room” by Philip Mitchell Design Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.

The Kips Bay Decorator Show House is located at 110 East 76th Street in New York, and is sponsored by Kohler, AJ Madison, Hickory Chair, Hearst Design Group, Morgan Stanley, Farrow & Ball, Cambria, AKDO, The Rug Company, Schumacher, Architectural Digest, and 1stdibs.

Continue reading Inside the 2018 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Aim High: Statement Ceilings Are 2018’s Most Romantic and Dramatic Decor Trend

For centuries, the statement ceiling was the ultimate sign of luxury (think Versailles, Robert Adam’s homes in Scotland, Otto Wagner’s post office in Vienna, Grand Central Terminal). Come the war years, however, such interior extravagance was unthinkable. The practice fell out of fashion by the 1940s and became nearly obsolete in the Modernist- and Minimalist-dominated decades that followed.

But this year, old-world grandeur is making a comeback. Pinterest reports that searches for “statement ceilings” are up 300 percent, and experts named it one of their interior design predictions for 2018. “As the ceiling has been so ignored over the last 70 years, it’s definitely about to have its renaissance again,” Martyn Lawrence Bullard of Martyn Lawrence Bullard told Vogue.

These modern ceilings, though, aren’t the sprawling tableaux of yesteryear. Instead, they’re done with bold paints, tailored wallpapers, or Expressionist elements. Je/Love Studio’s Lili Diallo describes the modern statement ceiling as a fifth wall, a response to a “clutter” averse generation. “It’s a good way to occupy space. You don’t need tons of furniture.”

You do, however, need a clear vision of what you want. Not just because the trend isn’t for the faint of heart—they don’t call it a “statement” for nothing—but, functionally, it’s quite difficult to remove one. When done right, however, the risk is worth the reward.

But, how, exactly, do you pull one off? Vogue gathered the best advice—whether you are looking to paint, wallpaper, or even commission a mural.

Painted Statement Ceiling

Painting a ceiling is the quickest, easiest way to pack a punch. Beware, however, of strong colors. With no light shining on them, the paint will read even darker, which makes a space look smaller. “Remember that the eye will be drawn to a strong color so the perceived ceiling height will drop—great if you have very high ceilings, but it can make for a claustrophobic space if you have very light walls,” Joa Studholme, international color consultant for Farrow & Ball, said. For white and cream walls, stick with gentle pinks, yellows, or blues.

If you’re dying to go bright and bold, however, Studholme has a word to the wise: “If you are wary of the ceiling height dropping, then don’t paint over the edges of the ceiling with your bold color, and take the wall color up over the crown molding onto the ceiling.”

But regardless of what color you choose, make sure you use a lacquered or glossy paint. “You can achieve reflections that fool the eye into believing a ceiling is twice as high, thus upping the drama stakes and really capturing the imagination,” Bullard said.

Wallpapered Statement Ceiling

If painting brings the drama, wallpaper brings the romance. Bullard’s favorites? Scenic prints. “[They] create a transformative, magical experience. Pattern can be really cool, like a faux marble paper, applied between molding on a ceiling. It will add grandeur and an old-world ambiance while retaining its fresh appeal.” Bullard also recommends metallic wallpapers. “They add such depth to a space and always amp up the glamor.”

Studholme is a sucker for geometric patterns, especially ones that can take up the wall and go over the ceiling. But, like Bullard, she also can’t resist a dash of metallic. Her favorite wallpaper is Farrow & Ball’s Brockhampton Star. “The metallic stars catch the light creating a ceiling that is eye-catching but not overpowering.”

Photographed by François Halard, Vogue, October 2009

Photographed by Oberto Gili, Vogue, January 2014

Want to do wallpaper but don’t know where to start? Pick one that has the same hue as your wall. It’ll create an uninterrupted, cohesive flow. “I think it feels a little more finished,” said Diallo.

Muraled Statement Ceiling

A muraled ceiling is by far the most difficult type to pull off. It takes a lot of time, energy, and, since it needs to be done by a professional, money. Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch, the interior design duo behind Roman and Williams, braved the final frontier of statement ceilings for New York’s Le Coucou. For them, the atmospheric ceiling was a tribute to their love the lost art. “Painting a scene or even a series of tones that recalls the sky can transform a space, re-creating the feeling of being outside, when you are inside,” says Standefer.

Their tips on how to pull it off? Don’t attempt to replicate well-known murals. Instead, try to evoke the feeling of the scene you want to depict. For example, if you want a sky: “A simple ombré is nice—avoid puffy clouds and blue skies—go for something moody like a Turner sky or an Impressionist interpretation of a sky. Perhaps by an unknown painter, or paint it yourself small and have a muralist copy it,” says Alesch.

Statement ceilings may be a trend for design daredevils, but why not aim high?

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Scared of Dark Paint? Don’t Be!

Judging from the pages of shelter magazines and interior designers’ Instagram feeds, dark colors are in. And paint companies are offering plenty of options.

Earlier this month, Sherwin-Williams picked a rich, moody blue called Oceanside as its 2018 color of the year. Benjamin Moore named Caliente, an intense shade of red, its upcoming color of the year, and its newest line of paint, Century, is composed of 75 saturated colors like Amethyst, Black Currant and Obsidian. Glidden Paint chose a black called Deep Onyx as its next color of the year, and Olympic Paints & Stains named Black Magic its choice for 2018.

The deep, rich colors promoted for years by companies like the decorator favorite Farrow & Ball, it seems, are finally going mainstream. “From the beautiful, vivacious tones of Radicchio to the super-dark rich of Studio Green, Farrow & Ball is seeing more confidence within decorating choices as we head into 2018,” Charlotte Cosby, who heads up the company’s creative team, wrote in an email.

Joa Studholme, Farrow & Ball’s international color consultant, attributed the trend to a desire to cocoon. “We’re sort of surrounding ourselves with comfort, and one of the ways we’re doing it is through color – to make our homes feel sort of nurturing and tender,” she said. “Instead of coming into clean, white houses, we’re going into homes that sort of give us a hug.”

For those of us more comfortable with whitewashed walls, however, it’s not so easy to make the leap to eggplant or onyx. But here are some tips from design and color experts on how to use dark colors without becoming overwhelmed — or claustrophobic.

29fix2-master1050

START SMALL If you’re nervous about playing with a deep, dark hue, “limit the color to the inside of cabinets, backs of bookshelves or a painted floor,” said Donald Kaufman, who owns the paint company Donald Kaufman Color with his wife, Taffy Dahl. “Dark, bold windows often bring the outside in.”

Ms. Studholme, of Farrow & Ball, suggested starting with a contained space like a powder room, the underside of a claw-foot tub or a hallway. “When you arrive, it creates a sense of drama,” she said. “You come through and go, ‘Wow.’” An added bonus, she noted: “A dark color in the hall makes the rooms off the hall feel really big and light.”

Ellen O’Neill, director of strategic design intelligence for Benjamin Moore, recommends starting with a focal point, like a fireplace mantel or the inside of shelves or drawers. “I recently photographed a home where the owner painted the inside of the drawers of an antique Chippendale chest a rich aubergine,” she said. “What a color surprise every time you open a drawer.” And as you become more confident, she said, “you can graduate to painting doors to a room or hallway, window trim or wainscoting.”

TEST IT OUT When you’re ready to tackle a whole room, “start with a color family that is already dominant in the home and select two to three shades that you feel makes a statement,” Ms. O’Neill said. “I’d get quarts of each color and paint large swatches of each, one set next to a window and one set in a corner. Observe how the room’s lighting affects the colors three times a day.”

EMBRACE THE DARKNESS “A deep, rich color goes an especially long way in a room without a lot of natural light, as dim rooms look particularly dull in lighter colors,” said Frances Merrill, the founder of Reath Design in Los Angeles, who painted her children’s room Farrow & Ball’s Pigeon gray. “It makes the small space feel finished and gives definition to the ever-rotating collection of artwork.”

In the playroom, she used Templeton Gray from Benjamin Moore. “Every surface in this room is usually covered in a layer of Legos and half-finished science experiments,” she said. “I find that the deeper colors mask the chaos.”

29fix4-master675

“Conventional wisdom states that small spaces — especially those facing north — should be lightened to increase the sense of space,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Instituteconsultancy. “However, painting trim a lighter color in an area painted with darker hues can actually increase the illusion of space,” she said, because it creates a “greater impression of height or width in the space.”

Whatever your situation, “it’s best to work with what you’ve got, rather than try to fight the light,” said Ms. Studholme of Farrow & Ball, which offers a guide to how light affects color on its website.

PREPARATION IS KEY “Before painting, ensure surfaces are sound, clean, dry and free from dirt, grease and any other contamination,” said Ms. Cosby of Farrow & Ball. “Always sand down surfaces to achieve a smooth base.”

And if you change your mind later, dark colors are just as easy to paint over as light ones, assuming you prep properly. “Start by priming over the bold hue, then apply two coats of the desired color,” said Ms. O’Neill of Benjamin Moore. But “be sure to allow the primer coat to dry completely before applying the first coat of color.”

GO HALFSIES To add “sophistication and spirit” to a client’s “stark, boxy, white rental,” Alex Kalita, a founder of Common Bond Design in Manhattan, painted the bottom half of the bedroom wall in Hague Bluefrom Farrow & Ball. She calls it “the chair-rail effect” and notes that it serves a few purposes: “It simulates architectural variation in otherwise uniform space; it ties in the building’s teal window frames; and it leverages the cozy, rich, complex and grown-up quality of Hague Blue, while maintaining the practical qualities of white paint, like the illusion of ceiling height.”

29fix1-blog427

Another tip: “If you’re tempted to go dark and bold on the walls, but you prefer a restrained aesthetic, try keeping the furniture neutral,” Ms. Kalita said. “You can even make bulkier pieces recede by camouflaging them in the wall color. We had our client’s Wonk NYC dresser color-matched to Hague Blue, so that the piece could augment the client’s storage without competing for attention with the room’s more deliberate and sculptural design elements. Dark walls do a good job of visually absorbing things.”

FINALLY, BE BRAVE “I encourage people to be brave with color and unleash their inner artist,” said Ms. Eiseman of the Pantone Color Institute. “Experiment with color, have fun with it, allow yourself to live with it for a while. It is, after all, just one or two cans of paint. And when, and if, you tire of it, move on to another color and treat yourself to another creative exercise.”

For more information about this blog Click Here!

%d bloggers like this: