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Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

The 2019 edition of ICFF is just around the corner. From Sunday, May 19 to Tuesday, May 21, ICFF will be open exclusively to trade professionals. New York City’s Javits Convention Center will host products by more than 900 exhibitors from over 60 countries in the high-end interiors space. With so much to see, Interior Design has selected a few standouts to preview ahead of the show. See 10 of them below.

Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini

AK/25 fixture by Paik Sun Kim for Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini. Booth 2163. Photography courtesy of Boffi and Fantini.

 

Boffi and Fantini‘s AK/25 fixture stands out for both its origami-inspired design and its innovation in the water-flow process.

arianeSké

Joy bar chair by Janine Hulsker for arianeSké. Booth 1827. Photography courtesy of arianeské. 

 

Dutch seating designer and manufacturer arianeSké began with a straightforward mission: to bring comfort back to high-end seating. The polished wooden backing of the Joy bar chair gives it a distinguished look.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

Bernhardt

Astra lounge chair by Cory Grosser for Bernhardt. Booths 1339 and 1325. Photography courtesy of Bernhardt.

 

Leave it to Cory Grosser to blend the best of precision—through geometric details and ease—in a curved silhouette. Grosser’s design of the Astra lounge chair for Bernhardt is suited to a variety of aesthetically different spaces.

 Brendan Ravenhill

Beam pendant from Brendan Ravenhill. Booth 857. Photography courtesy of Brendan Ravenhill.

 

Brendan Ravenhill‘s Beam light fixture responds to the efficiency and casting power of LED lighting with style. Beam makes use of bounced and refracted light to create a soft glow, in a strong linear silhouette.

Ceramics of Italy 

The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy. Booths 2229-2325. Photography courtesy of Ceramics of Italy.

 

A distinguished collection of porcelain slabs, The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy exudes drama and luxury. The four available patterns are inspired by exquisite marbles from three continents, with suitable applications ranging from flooring to walls and custom countertops. 

Kohler 

Sensate Touchless Kitchen Faucet with Kohler Konnect. Booth 2239. Photography courtesy of Kohler. 

 

A sleek, no-contact faucet is the stuff of culinary enthusiasts’ dreams. Kohler Konnect immerses users in experiential luxury, with the best of good design and intelligent technology.

Ocrúm

Orizon mirror by Ocrúm. Booth 1062. Photography courtesy of Ocrúm.

 

The Orizon mirror, part of Brooklyn-based design studio Ocrúm‘s debut collection, toes the line between art and functional decor. The rippled surface is evocative of a serene sea, and blends into a smooth colored sky.

Ross Gardam

Nebulae chandelier by Ross Gardam. Booth 1763. Photography by Ross Gardam. Photography © Hadyn Cattach.

 

Ross Gardam brings a redesigned version of his Nebulae chandelier to his eponymous design studio’s ICFF booth. The horizontal configuration is a new aspect of the chandelier’s design, and the uniquely-layered glass shows a highly original exploration of light’s diffusion.

Studio Henk

Co lounge chairs; 2.5 seat sofa (left) and single seat armchair (right) by Studio Henk. Booth 1827. Photography by Studio Henk.

 

The finishes of every piece offered by Studio Henk are fully customizable. The functional aesthetic of the Co lounge chair epitomizes modernism and, every detail, from the Kvadrat upholstery to the stain of the wood accents, can be changed to fit the mood of the space it’ll go into.

SkLO

Balance pendant by SkLO. Booth 957. Photography courtesy of SkLO.

 

The Balance pendant is emblematic of SkLO‘s emphasis on beauty and originality. The pendant’s soft curve and inherent asymmetry creates visual interest.

Read more: 2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage 

Continue reading Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

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TOUR KATHRYN M. IRELAND’S SANTA MONICA HOME THAT’S BIG ON BOHEMIAN DECOR

The former Million Dollar Decorators star plays and works amid her boho “mishmash” — complete with a garden straight out of a Moroccan riad.

“I spent so much time going to work when my kids were younger that the only person who got to enjoy my house was my housekeeper,” quips British-born designer of textiles and interiors Kathryn M. Ireland.

After 25 years in Santa Monica, California, she has finally committed to the city’s work-from-home ethos with her new micro-compound, purchased last year from the actor Tobey ­Maguire. “I wanted to be able to cross the courtyard to go to the office,” she explains.

Kathryn ireland

Ireland cools off in her pool, framed by the back of the main house, a 1990s addition by architect Ruben S. Ojeda to the original 1920s Spanish-style cottage.

Known for her boho spirit and exuberant use of color, Ireland has warmed up the 1920s Spanish main house and made it feel more cohesive with the property’s two other structures — a guest cottage and a modern back studio.

And she’s done it using a “mishmash” (as she likes to call it) of her brand’s signature textiles, English and French antiques, patchwork rugs, and eclectic accents, from a hand-painted Sicilian table to the whimsical photograph of a horse having tea that hangs in one of two kitchens. (“Yes, I use them both,” she says.)

bohemian decor santa monica homes
Trevor Tondro

In the living room, the custom sofa is in a linen velvet from Ireland’s fabric collection, and the armchairs are covered in an Otis Textiles linen slipcover (left) and a fabric purchased in Marrakech (right). The rag rug is from Amadi Carpets, the steel-framed sliding doors are by Chateau Domingue, and the wall hanging is a 19th-century suzani.

The former Million Dollar Decorators star — her clients include Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Steve Martin — turned the courtyard into an oasis. The outdoor lounge, with its wicker pendants and striped banquettes, is now the perfect vantage point for watching watercolor sunsets. Newly planted succulents and a freshly installed swimming pool create, she says, an “Ibiza-meets–Luis Barragán” vibe.

She hosts dinner parties in the back studio, roasting chicken in her cherry-red AGA stove. Instead of cabinets, she uses her own textiles as curtains to disguise shelves of pots and pans. Defining the dining area is a monolithic, floor-to-ceiling 18th-century English wooden cabinet that’s filled with design books, several of them written by Ireland herself. The table, which seats up to 26, is also antique and “very important,” she observes, adding, “I like to use that word when an antique’s good.”

bohemian decor santa monica homes

Artworks by Hugo Guinness, Martin Mull, Thomas Hart Benton, and others hang above a Mexican console.

Keeping watch over guests is a photo of Ireland in the style of an odalisque taken from an old Scalamandré advertising campaign. “It’s kind of cheeky,” she says. There’s also a piano (“because someone can always play”), and when she’s ready to scamper off in her Birkenstocks across the courtyard to bed, the revelry will often continue into the night.

bohemian decor santa Monica homes
Trevor Tondro

The built-in stucco sectional in the outdoor lounge is topped with cushions in a custom Kathryn M. Ireland outdoor fabric. The table is from her French Finds collection, and the chairs are by Consort.

When it’s just her, she eats in the combined kitchen and TV room in the main house. Under a vivid landscape of the Santa Monica Pier by photographer Stephen Wilkes, she settles into the oversize L‑shaped sofa, which is topped with pillows in beach-glass hues.

bohemian decor santa monica homes
Trevor Tondro

At Kathryn M. Ireland’s live-work compound in Santa Monica, a studio building designed in the 1970s by the firm Koning Eizenberg serves as both an office and entertaining area. The vintage Willy Guhl fiber-cement chairs and planters are from Inner Gardens.

The stonewashed linen fabrics are from her son Otis Weis’s new textile line, Otis Textiles, which he describes as “a contemporary collaboration of both our tastes.” (Also launching this spring is her new online site, the Perfect Room, which will offer room bundles curated by Ireland and other designers, including Michael S. Smith, Barry Dixon, and Beth Webb.)

In the living room, a 19th-century Uzbek textile hangs over the red linen-velvet sofa as a symbol of Ireland’s design empire. “This I bought many years ago, and it was the inspiration for my Safi Suzani print,” she says of her iconic textile pattern. “You mix things up with old and new,” she says in a room where the furnishings include 17th-century French chairs, an 18th-century Mexican console, and a cocktail table from her furniture line.

bohemian decor santa monica homes
Trevor Tondro

Ireland designed the hand hammered–iron canopy bed and the sofa in the master bedroom. The cocktail table is African, and the bed-curtains are in one of her fabrics.

The latter, a simple wood piece, is covered with objects both precious and not. “I’m always picking things up,” she says, “whether it’s an Indian cowbell, a flea-market Buddha, or that little tartan chair in the corner. Things just speak to me.”

The powder room is covered in a pale paisley wallpaper, and in her son Louis’s bedroom, Indian blankets from the Santa Monica flea market reflect Ireland’s lifelong love of needlework. “I won a prize when I was seven years old for my patchwork quilt,” she muses. “I used to do perfect hexagons, but now you can do it so rustically.”

bohemian decor santa monica homes
Trevor Tondro

Below: Ireland’s Barley Twist bed is topped with Indian bedding from her collection. The pillows and curtains are in her fabrics, the chair is by Sika Design, the lamp is from Hollywood at Home, and the rug is by Woven.

Upstairs, there’s a reading nook with an upholstered chair and ottoman in a new pattern — her first foray into digital printing — inspired by a summer trip to Maine.

“I’ve always been a hand printer, but when my mentor, Robert Kime, said he was doing digital and I realized what it could do, especially this painterly look, I had to try it,” she says. “There’s a movement back from beige and plain to color and pattern again—whether it’s on fashion models or on the walls.”

bohemian decor santa monica homes

In the powder room, the sink and stand are by Kreoo, the fittings are by Fantini, the mirror is by Arteriors, and the wallpaper is from Ireland’s line.

The raffia sheers floating around her iron canopy bed are another of her designs, and the bedspread is an antique Indian textile in vivid oranges and reds, a pair of hues (“They are just so uplifting”) that recur throughout the compound.

By contrast, the master bath — which sports a contemporary look with its quartz floors and modern glass shower — might just be the most understated room in the whole place. “I like to hide the loo, so I’m a big believer in a little pony wall,” she says.

Back to Ireland’s reality in the bedroom, where a quirky red Sicilian mirror has a prominent place. “It’s Persian candlesticks living well with Chinese nightstands, an African table, and a French piece,” she says, describing her beloved mishmash. “If only people could live so effortlessly together.”

This story was originally published in the April 2018 issue of ELLE DECOR.

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8 Highlights From KBIS 2018

January 10, 2018

At the annual Kitchen & Bath Industry Show taking place through January 11th in Orlando, Florida, the Maximalism trend (with a very capital M) meets clean-lined Modernism. From affordable terrazzo-look porcelain tiles to high-octane hues on professional ranges, we can’t help but be bowled away by the eye-popping designs on display.

 

Kallista

Spare and architectural, look out for the Grid 3D-printed faucet from the Kohler-affiliated brand when it launches in summer 2018. “Intrigued by the fundamentals of the De Stijl movement and how it embraced the de-massing of a design has always sparked my imagination,” explains Kallista’s Design Studio manager Bill McKeone.

Grid by Kallista.

Bertazzoni

The Italian manufacturer engineers a new Professional series of ranges in 30”, 36” and 48” widths with clean lines and a stylish yet functional temperature gauge inspired by chronograph watch dials. Automobile-grade finishes come in vibrant orange, red, and yellow as well as classic black and white.

Professional series by Bertazzoni.

Ann Sacks

LA-based designer Kelly Wearstler returns with her fourth collection for the American-based tile company, a long-standing provider of now-trending encaustic tile. Dubbed Gem, the collection includes Elope, a swirling pattern combining two colorways; Swell, an organic yet graphic pattern of curved lines; and Evoke, a marbled pattern adorned with hand-applied squiggles.

Evoke by Kelly Wearstler for Ann Sacks.

Compac

A sculptural form in engineered quartz reads high-contrast in colorways Unique Marquina and Unique Calacatta. The piece was conceived as a modernist hammam, or Turkish bath, by Valencia-based GG Architects

Hammam by Compac.

Dekton by Cosentino

Designer Daniel Germani‘s DeKauri credenza reimagines the bathroom sink by tucking it away inside an elegant credenza made in collaboration with Italian furniture maker Riva 1920. The Dekton washbasinplays off 40,000-year-old Kauri wood from New Zealand. Thin-profile brass lighting by New York-based Juniper Design outfits the interior. “DeKauri is a modern-day heirloom,” says the designer. 

DeKauri credenza by Dekton by Cosentino.

Sicis

Marble, with an edge. Sicis turns up the volume on stone standbys with Electric Marble, its fuschia, turquoise, gold, or silver veining applied to their thin-profile Vetrite material.

Electric Marble by Sicis.

Artistic Tile

Get the coveted look of terrazzo without the high price tag and endless maintenance with the maker’s durable Pavimento porcelain tile in a pleasingly large 32” square format. 

Pavimento by Artistic Tile.

Fantini

The Italian maker introduces three new finishes—street-smart Gun Metal, rosy Matte Copper, and soft British Gold, the later based on the historic hue of the mined material found in England.

Gun Metal, Matte Copper, and British Gold finishes by Fantini.

Continue reading 8 Highlights From KBIS 2018

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