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Tag Archives: Edie Cohen

Cindy Crawford on Hand for Opening of New Cosentino City Los Angeles Center

From left: Matt Thurston, Massimo Ballucchi, Eduardo Cosentino, Cindy Crawford, Brandon Calvo, Patty Dominguez, Isabel Martinez-Cosentino Rosado, and Santiago Alfonso Rodriguez. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.

 

The recent opening of the Cosentino City Los Angeles Center, in the heart of West Hollywood’s design district, was a big deal. First, there was the presence of supermodel Cindy Crawford, Cosentino’s Silestonebrand ambassador, who was on hand to cut the ribbon after just inking another contract. Equally photogenic was the $1.7 million property itself: 4,208 square feet of indoor and outdoor space, including 3,529 square feet of showroom to display the Spanish producer’s collections of Silestone and Dekton natural quartz surfacing.

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Read more: Luminaire Opens Showroom in LA Designed by Make Architecture 

The showroom at Cosentino City Los Angeles Center. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.

Samples are displayed in quasi-full-height slabs near the entry and in smaller versions within a more intimate enclosure toward the rear. The ultra-resilient Dekton product appears outside on the property’s 680-square-foot terrace, which also has party place potential.

The outdoor terrace of Cosentino City Los Angeles Center showcases Dekton product. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.

We caught up with Eduardo Cosentino, executive vice president of global sales and CEO of Cosentino North America, while he mingled with 300 guests from LA’s architecture and design communities as part of his whirlwind global tour. The rationale for why here, why now, even when a North Hollywood showroom for the company’s brands exists, was quite simple. “This is where the architects and designers are,” said the third-generation executive of the family-owned company. “This is where they want to come.”

A lounge space at Cosentino City Los Angeles Center. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.

And why not? In addition to hands-on experience, Cosentino City—one of four in the U.S. and 12 worldwide—offers a comprehensive digital experience to aid designers in both the physical and virtual worlds. Plus, lounge space galore encourages lingering.

The Silestone Gallery at Cosentino City Los Angeles Center. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.
Silestone samples at Cosentino City Los Angeles Center. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.
Supermodel and Silestone brand ambassador Cindy Crawford. Photography courtesy of Cosentino.

Read more: New in Los Angeles: 10 Recent Projects in the City of Angels

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SOM Fashions Former Chicago Firehouse Into Bespoke Men’s Hat Atelier

PROJECT NAME Optimo
LOCATION Chicago
FIRM Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
SQ. FT. 7,700 SQF

Chicago is renowned for myriad phenomena. Jazz and the blues. Politics. Pizza. And, of course, architecture. But hats? Yes, according to Graham Thompson, founder of Optimo, a men’s hat company based in the city’s South Side. Steady growth over its 25-year existence has called for expansion—and a new space. It comes courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the 82-year-old firm with significant ties to the city.

> Project Resources

Thompson has been a hat devotee since he was 16, when he’d saved up for two years to purchase his first one from legendary Chicago hatmaker Johnny Tyus. He eventually apprenticed with Tyus for seven years, and then, upon graduating college and Tyus’s retirement, Thompson bought his equipment and opened Optimo. Last year, when it came time to move someplace larger, he found the ideal venue in a 1914 firehouse about a mile from his original location.

Custom steel armatures power and illuminate the machines in the workroom. The same metal forms the custom rolling racks along the window wall. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

Though derelict for years, the 7,700-square-foot, two-story building was “built like a brick tank,” Thompson recalls. Interiors, though, were another story. “It looked like a bomb went off.” To re-envision it as a bona fide factory and showroom, Thompson’s dream was to enlist SOM. The firm values craftsmanship, authenticity, and timeless luxury just as he does, but rarely takes on projects of such scope.

Fortunately, retired SOM managing partner Richard Tomlinson is an Optimo collector and helped facilitate a meeting between Thompson and the firm. Although a small endeavor, design partner Brian Lee saw an opportunity. “It’s a great story for the city,” the architect says, “helping to continue a rich history of craftsmanship in South Chicago. Plus, the building was in better shape than others we’d seen before.”

Optimo felt hats line shelves formed from aircraft cable. Photography by AJ Trela.

Thompson had already gotten the renovation ball rolling by commissioning a pair of gleaming brass-clad entry doors. Then SOM took charge. Masonry was re-pointed and cleaned, especially on the interior, with its grimy diesel residue. Other walls were re-plastered. Upstairs, which is dedicated mostly to the showroom, new stained oak flooring was installed. On the double-height ground floor, the existing concrete floor was sealed and polished. That’s the workroom where each hat, ranging from $395 for straw to $1,000 for felt, gets handmade by Thompson and his seven-person team. Expressed as a contemporary workshop with an industrial aesthetic, its design draws from a palette of understated materials and colors.

To plan the space, Lee first researched the making of men’s hats, which involves blocking, surface- and brim-edge finishing, trimming, flanging, shaping, and steaming—a process that takes from two to six weeks to complete. “It helped us determine the organization of the machinery with the right power and lighting and how much space each machine would require,” he explains. “We ended up falling in love with them,” referring to such pieces as the French steam table that dates to the early 1900’s. (SOM painted all the machines, old and new, a dark gray for uniformity.)

Laminated glass covers the aperture left by the firehouse pole, so the workroom is visible from the upstairs showroom. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

That research resulted in what Lee calls “goal-post lighting,” brawny blackened-steel armatures with integral LEDs and power capability that frame the trio of workbenches arrayed down the center of the workroom floor. Along one side of the space, rolling hat-storage racks lined up between the window bays are framed in the same metal. Toward the back is the walnut and cork hatter’s wall, a nearly floor-to-ceiling construction that houses hundreds of hat forms plus the doors to the sewing and surface-finishing rooms behind it.

The second floor emits an airier, more refined aesthetic compared to the industrial vibe downstairs. But it didn’t start out that way. It had similar proportions to the workroom—“almost too overscale for the gracious feeling we were going for,” Lee notes. So, he and his team tempered the scale by installing a kitchen and an office for Thompson, and then creating a steel pendant fixture 10 feet in diameter to center the remaining showroom space. The fixture is like “an extended wing,” he adds, anchored by cables from a central escutcheon. Below it, a lengthy table crafted from two solid planks of walnut hosts design discussions between Thompson and his clients. He can narrate the history of the hat-making craft with the rare vintage tools and artifacts displayed in the tall steel-framed shelving unit nearby and throughout the atelier—he has traveled to over 15 countries in search of them.

Stained oak flooring flows through the lounge, furnished with Mermelada Estudio sofas. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

Off the showroom, a portal of walnut repurposed from Thompson’s original hatter’s bench leads to the lounge, the firehouse’s former captain’s room. But what’s a firehouse without a pole? Yes, this venue once had one, but it was stolen. So, Lee and his team decided to fit the aperture with a round of transparent laminated glass. Now, with light from the showroom’s windows streaming deep into the workroom below, craftsmanship is clearly on display.

> Project Resources

Project Team: Jaime Velez; Jeremy Bouck; Daniel Bell; Dennis Milam; Rebecca Delaney; Michelle Mirrielees; Dickson Whitney III: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Bureau of Architecture and Design: Design Consultant. Carpenter Corey: Woodwork. Bader Art Metal & Fabrication: Metalwork. Hugo Sanchez: Plasterwork. Cotter Consulting: Project Management. Helios Construction Services: General Contractor.

See more from the April issue of Interior Design

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Continue reading SOM Fashions Former Chicago Firehouse Into Bespoke Men’s Hat Atelier

Peter Marino Delves Into Italian History to Renovate Bulgari New York

PROJECT NAME Bulgari New York
LOCATION New York
FIRM Peter Marino Architect
SQ. FT. 4,500 SQF

Since 1989, Bulgari has been an ipso facto New York landmark. Its two floors of Italian jewelry and luxury goods have occupied Warren & Wetmore’s 1921 Crown Building on a prime corner in Midtown, keeping company with Harry Winston and Van Cleef & Arpels. But last year, it was time for a refresh.

Think Bulgari, and visions of the brand’s centuries-long heritage in gold, silver, and gems comes to mind. You may also conjure sunny images of the Eternal City, with its terra cotta–toned facades, and thoughts of Elizabeth Taylor and Rome’s Cinecittà, considered the hub of Italian cinema. In other words, la dolce vita. To translate that inimitable glamour architecturally, the company turned to Peter Marino.

The Interior Design Hall of Fame member’s connection with Bulgari began six years with Peter Marino Architect’s renovation of the flagship in Rome, where the company was founded in 1884 and is headquartered today. Then came PMA’s re-envisioning of the London store in 2016. All the while, at the behest of new owners LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, Marino was developing a design language to burnish the brand’s identity, much of which is carried through all three stores. But since both the Italy and U.K. projects were in landmarked buildings, the firm was precluded from exterior interventions. Manhattan was another story, however. There, Marino could tell a tale of continuity and innovation both inside and out. “New York is a younger and more modern city,” he begins.

LEDs concealed in the bronze grillwork turn on at night. Photography by Manolo Yllera.

“I’m a complete bronze freak,” admits Marino, who is an avid collector of Baroque and Renaissance bronzes and a creator of sculptural boxes cast in the ancient alloy. It’s a passion he shares with classical Rome, where bronze was the metal of choice. In Marino’s hands, it became the basis for elaborate grillwork throughout.

Outside, bronze crisscrosses the double-height windows on two elevations, creating “a level of transparency that’s quite a new concept,” the architect notes. “Most jewelers are walled against the day.” The motif—diagonal rhomboids with rosette corners—is derived from an archival sketch for a Bulgari brooch, sadly never created.

For the 4,500-square-foot interior, more bronze screens surround the new statement stairway up to the balustrade along the rebuilt mezzanine. Their matching geometry has deeper historical roots: Its pattern is borrowed from that on the floor of the Pantheon, an intervention Marino had devised for the Rome and London stores.

In the jewelry salon, the pair of chandeliers were originally designed in 1964 by Gio Ponti for the Parco dei Principi Hotel in Rome. Photography by Manolo Yllera.

The same goes for other design elements throughout. For instance, since Bulgari is quintessentially Italian, Marino again looked to the country’s modernist architecture and furnishings for inspiration. For furniture and lighting, he dove into the postwar period, examining work by Gio Ponti, Piero Portaluppi, and Carlo Scarpa. In fact, several of the era’s signature pieces are here. A ’50’s Osvaldo Borsani table in pink marble and mahogany, for example, functions as a display surface in the main jewelry salon, where the central vitrines are anchored by massive bronze bases. A pair of Ponti’s exuberant chandeliers, also bronze, hang from the shallow vault around the salon’s 18-foot ceiling.

Materiality, color, and historicism have been carried through, as well. For materials, Marino homes in on pietra, “classic Italian marbles and rare stones, to be exact,” he states. Here, there are five varieties, their colors and vibrant veining an opulent mainstay of the densely layered palette. Pavonazzetto, or Italian marble, pervades downstairs in columns and stair treads, while Breccia di Stazzema, another Italian marble, appears on the exterior and interior portals. Twinkling red porphyry trims the gleaming marble mosaic floor, inset with a single eight-pointed star at the entry, while white Thassos marble borders it.

“Yellow, orange, red. I hadn’t done a store with those colors before,” Marino continues. “For me, it’s stepping out”—into the light of a Roman summer afternoon, as it were. He’s referring to the apricot silk lining the display niches, another gesture spearheaded in the Rome flagship. He has not only repeated it in New York but also built upon it. In the mezzanine lounge, also known as Maison Bulgari, a silk blend in the same color upholsters the sectional sofa, its silhouette inspired by Borsani originals.

Stair treads are Italian marble. Photography by Manolo Yllera.

That lounge functions as an event space or, with its separate VIP room, a private sales area. But here’s one of the ways the New York store differs from Rome and London—and, actually, most other jewelry stores: The high-end pieces are not cloistered away in off-limit rooms. Customers and tourists alike can gape at five- and six-figure jewelry and watches right up front. Toward the back, the flooring changes to Italian walnut, a warm backdrop for the selling of bridal and other accessories such as Bulgari fragrances.

Undoubtedly, the setting is glorious. And of course, glamorous. Taylor, arguably the epitome of glamour and Bulgari’s most famous client, is memorialized with a commissioned artwork by Campagnolo & Biondo. Andy Warhol, who coordinated a meeting between the actress and this architect when he had them both to his Montauk compound in the ’70’s, may have been as enamored of oversize gems as the movie star, creating a series of screen prints to prove it. One of them hangs in the store between the niches showcasing watches.

Another purely New York characteristic of this project is Marino’s representation of the city’s energy. It’s apparent on the exterior grillwork: At dusk, LEDs behind each rosette pulse in changing patterns. “Between the neighboring high-end stores, Bulgari wins.” Italian glamour and American pizzazz—now that’s an unbeatable combination.

Marble mosaic flooring is inset with a porphyry star at the entrance. Photography by Manolo Yllera.

Project Team: Frank Spadaro; Alex Lavecchia; Luis Gonzalez; Joseamid Martinez-Cosme: Peter Marino Architect. Design Republic: Architect of Record. Luce5; Metis: Lighting Consultants. Eckersley O’callaghan; Robert Silman Associates Structural Engineers: Structural Engineers. Rosini Engineering: MEP. Sice Previt: Metalwork. Damiani Marmi: Stonework. L’Artigiano: Plaster Workshop. Michilli: General Contractor.

Product Sources: Through Nilufar: Chandeliers (Jewelry Salon). Green Allestimenti: Custom vitrines. Margaritelli: Wood flooring.

See more from the April issue of Interior Design

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SOM Fashions Former Chicago Firehouse Into Bespoke Men’s Hat Atelier

PROJECT NAME Optimo
LOCATION Chicago
FIRM Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
SQ. FT. 7,700 SQF

Chicago is renowned for myriad phenomena. Jazz and the blues. Politics. Pizza. And, of course, architecture. But hats? Yes, according to Graham Thompson, founder of Optimo, a men’s hat company based in the city’s South Side. Steady growth over its 25-year existence has called for expansion—and a new space. It comes courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the 82-year-old firm with significant ties to the city.

> Project Resources

Thompson has been a hat devotee since he was 16, when he’d saved up for two years to purchase his first one from legendary Chicago hatmaker Johnny Tyus. He eventually apprenticed with Tyus for seven years, and then, upon graduating college and Tyus’s retirement, Thompson bought his equipment and opened Optimo. Last year, when it came time to move someplace larger, he found the ideal venue in a 1914 firehouse about a mile from his original location.

Custom steel armatures power and illuminate the machines in the workroom. The same metal forms the custom rolling racks along the window wall. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

Though derelict for years, the 7,700-square-foot, two-story building was “built like a brick tank,” Thompson recalls. Interiors, though, were another story. “It looked like a bomb went off.” To re-envision it as a bona fide factory and showroom, Thompson’s dream was to enlist SOM. The firm values craftsmanship, authenticity, and timeless luxury just as he does, but rarely takes on projects of such scope.

Fortunately, retired SOM managing partner Richard Tomlinson is an Optimo collector and helped facilitate a meeting between Thompson and the firm. Although a small endeavor, design partner Brian Lee saw an opportunity. “It’s a great story for the city,” the architect says, “helping to continue a rich history of craftsmanship in South Chicago. Plus, the building was in better shape than others we’d seen before.”

Optimo felt hats line shelves formed from aircraft cable. Photography by AJ Trela.

Thompson had already gotten the renovation ball rolling by commissioning a pair of gleaming brass-clad entry doors. Then SOM took charge. Masonry was re-pointed and cleaned, especially on the interior, with its grimy diesel residue. Other walls were re-plastered. Upstairs, which is dedicated mostly to the showroom, new stained oak flooring was installed. On the double-height ground floor, the existing concrete floor was sealed and polished. That’s the workroom where each hat, ranging from $395 for straw to $1,000 for felt, gets handmade by Thompson and his seven-person team. Expressed as a contemporary workshop with an industrial aesthetic, its design draws from a palette of understated materials and colors.

To plan the space, Lee first researched the making of men’s hats, which involves blocking, surface- and brim-edge finishing, trimming, flanging, shaping, and steaming—a process that takes from two to six weeks to complete. “It helped us determine the organization of the machinery with the right power and lighting and how much space each machine would require,” he explains. “We ended up falling in love with them,” referring to such pieces as the French steam table that dates to the early 1900’s. (SOM painted all the machines, old and new, a dark gray for uniformity.)

Laminated glass covers the aperture left by the firehouse pole, so the workroom is visible from the upstairs showroom. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

That research resulted in what Lee calls “goal-post lighting,” brawny blackened-steel armatures with integral LEDs and power capability that frame the trio of workbenches arrayed down the center of the workroom floor. Along one side of the space, rolling hat-storage racks lined up between the window bays are framed in the same metal. Toward the back is the walnut and cork hatter’s wall, a nearly floor-to-ceiling construction that houses hundreds of hat forms plus the doors to the sewing and surface-finishing rooms behind it.

The second floor emits an airier, more refined aesthetic compared to the industrial vibe downstairs. But it didn’t start out that way. It had similar proportions to the workroom—“almost too overscale for the gracious feeling we were going for,” Lee notes. So, he and his team tempered the scale by installing a kitchen and an office for Thompson, and then creating a steel pendant fixture 10 feet in diameter to center the remaining showroom space. The fixture is like “an extended wing,” he adds, anchored by cables from a central escutcheon. Below it, a lengthy table crafted from two solid planks of walnut hosts design discussions between Thompson and his clients. He can narrate the history of the hat-making craft with the rare vintage tools and artifacts displayed in the tall steel-framed shelving unit nearby and throughout the atelier—he has traveled to over 15 countries in search of them.

Stained oak flooring flows through the lounge, furnished with Mermelada Estudio sofas. Photography by Tom Rossiter.

Off the showroom, a portal of walnut repurposed from Thompson’s original hatter’s bench leads to the lounge, the firehouse’s former captain’s room. But what’s a firehouse without a pole? Yes, this venue once had one, but it was stolen. So, Lee and his team decided to fit the aperture with a round of transparent laminated glass. Now, with light from the showroom’s windows streaming deep into the workroom below, craftsmanship is clearly on display.

> Project Resources

Project Team: Jaime Velez; Jeremy Bouck; Daniel Bell; Dennis Milam; Rebecca Delaney; Michelle Mirrielees; Dickson Whitney III: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Bureau of Architecture and Design: Design Consultant. Carpenter Corey: Woodwork. Bader Art Metal & Fabrication: Metalwork. Hugo Sanchez: Plasterwork. Cotter Consulting: Project Management. Helios Construction Services: General Contractor.

See more from the April issue of Interior Design

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

Australian Carpet Maker Armadillo & Co Lands in L.A.

Armadillo & Co’s Beverly Hills showroom. Photography by Joe Schmelzer.

Catchy name, Armadillo. Turns out those Aussies know how to garner attention and do things right. The Australian-based carpet company has landed stateside with a Los Angeles showroom in where else but Beverly Hills. Partners Jodie Fried, who’s an L.A. transplant, and Sally Pattharst, who is not, chose a prime 2,000-square-foot stretch on Wilshire Boulevard to stake their claim. They did further research, commissioning Standard Architecture’s Jeffrey Allsbrook and Silvia Kuhle, well versed in cool, clean selling environments. The duo designed a stunning gallery-esque setting with exposed brick walls and 18-foot ceiling to show Armadillo’s wares, mostly neutrals, mostly wools.

Interestingly, Armadillo & Co spans the continents, having most of its rugs hand-made in India in small villages, at that. Thus, an artisanal quality characterizes  both products and process. Rugs are stocked in standard sizes and colorations, but the company works with designers for custom commissions. As for the former, products are warehoused in Torrance, California, for quick delivery.

Armadillo & Co’s Beverly Hills showroom. Photography by Joe Schmelzer.
Armadillo & Co’s Beverly Hills showroom. Photography by Joe Schmelzer.
Armadillo & Co’s Beverly Hills showroom. Photography by Joe Schmelzer.
Armadillo & Co’s Beverly Hills showroom. Photography by Joe Schmelzer.

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Ceramics of Italy Toasts 25 Years of Tile Competition With Panel Discussion at Coverings

Baltimore Slate House by Ziger/Snead Architects. Photography by Jennifer Hughes and Adam Rouse.

Leave it to the Italians with their inimitable sense of style to create a multi-media event for their Coverings presentation. Ceramics of Italy will be celebrating the 25th anniversary of its annual tile competition with an announcement of the winners and panel discussion with these illustrious designers and architects led by Interior Design deputy editor Edie Cohen. This year, the competition boasted 60 entries from North America and named six awards in the built category and, as a first, one in the student category. Top prizes go to Studio Libeskind, Douglas Bothner of Ziger/Snead Architects, and ZAS Architecture.

Bergeron Centre for Engineering Excellence by ZAS Architects. Photography by Double Space.
Dover Street Market by Raquel Raney & Brennan Broome.
Sapphire by Studio Libeskind. Photography by Hufton+Crow.

 

This being Italy by way of Atlanta, everything starts with lunch. Yes, there will be pasta. Yes, there will be espresso, and immediately after lunch comes a celebration of Italy through cinema, also dear to the Italian heart. Previewing at Coverings is the film Timeless Tiles: The Italian Legacy directed by Francesca Molteni and architectural historian Fulvio Irace. Tours of the pavilion, e+i Studio’s Strada Dinamica (B3 1630), follow. Lo spettacolo takes place on Wednesday, May 9th starting at 12:30. 

Continue reading Ceramics of Italy Toasts 25 Years of Tile Competition With Panel Discussion at Coverings

Miansai Turns Vintage Wheels Into Mobile Shops

Miansai Airstream. Photography courtesy of Miansai.  

 

Spring means time for a wardrobe refresh, gals and guys alike. Accessories speak volumes, especially arm candy like a gleaming gold or vermeil screw cuff for the former, leather wraps for the latter. Yes, the fashion cognoscenti knows we’re talking about Miansai, the jewelry, leather goods, and eye wear collection begun by Michael Saiger in 2008. Actually, his work predates the formal launch as he started designing and creating jewelry while in college. Ever the entrepreneur, the Miami-based Saiger has given a new twist to both retail and the pop-up phenomenon. Yes, there are now independent Miansai shops in New York’s SoHo and Venice, California as well as representation by such heavy hitters as Fred Segal, Barneys, and Bergdorf Goodman. Yes, Miansai sells online. But what about wanting to try things on (especially gold and diamond pieces at the upper end of the price spectrum) and not in proximity of the retail sites? Fear not. Miansai has a mobile fleet that might bring the collection closer to home. In fact, the first vehicle hit the road even before New York and California locales opened in 2013 and 2016, respectively. Saiger wanted to test the waters and bring brand awareness before committing to brick and mortar operations.

Miansai Airstream. Photography courtesy of Miansai.
Miansai Airstream. Photography courtesy of Miansai.
Miansai Airstream. Photography courtesy of Miansai.

 

Design savvy that he is, Saiger chose not any vehicle, but super cool vintage wheels. The first was a 1958 Airstream. Last year it hit some 15 U.S. cities and made guest appearances at festivals such as South by Southwest, Coachella, and Jazz Fest, before heading to the Hamptons and Palm Beach. Then came two Piaggios, a Lambretta, and a VW bus, with another slated to arrive from Italy before year’s end. All are refurbished and fitted out in Miami, where Miansai makes much of the jewelry in its metal shop. As for the fleet, “we do about half of the work in house, and all the of the metal work,” Saiger explains.

Miansai Fiat. Photography courtesy of Miansai. 
Miansai Piaggio. Photography courtesy of Miansai. 
Miansai Lambretta. Photography courtesy of Miansai. 

“For the last four years, we concentrated on festivals.  This year, we’re looking at cool hotels and restaurants,” he says of venues. “We like to catch people where they’re not expecting to be shopping.” Look for the vehicles at the Jeremy West Hollywood hotel, the Malibu Pier, the 1 Hotel and Delano in South Beach, the Fontainebleau of Miami Beach, and Navy Beach, Montauk. Maybe you can pick up our personal favorite, the gold offset cuff.

Continue reading Miansai Turns Vintage Wheels Into Mobile Shops

The Next Generation of Furniture Designers at USC

About a decade ago, architect David Martin launched a furniture design studio at the University of Southern California. It took students from the sketchpad and computer into the shop where they actually created their products. It has been ongoing since. This year, under the leadership of John Uniack and R. Scott Mitchell, 30 students created both a table and chair. Results were shown on campus in a four-hour presentation. Edie Cohen and Art Gray, participants in the endeavor since its inception, were on hand as jury members for the final review.

Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.
Photography by Art Gray.

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