Tag Archives: Dezeen

Dezeen’s latest Pinterest board focuses purely on minimalist design

Our latest Pinterest board is dedicated to pared-back design, architecture and interiors – from John Pawson’s immaculate London workspace and studio to the all-white interior of a hilltop house in Portugal. Follow Dezeen on Pinterest ›

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Top Interior Design Of 2016 At Day One Of Inside 2016

This monochrome fashion boutique by Shanwei Weng & Jiadie Yuan/Hangzhou AN Interior Design has won the retail category at this year’s Inside festival awards

Top interior design of 2016 revealed at day one of Inside 2016

1950s-style burger restaurant and a monochrome fashion boutique are among the first category winners at this year’s Inside festival awards.

Aiming to showcase the world’s best interior design, the Inside awards also recognised a project to transform the ground floor of a heritage building into workspaces.

Six more winners will be revealed tomorrow, and each category winner will be put forward for the title World Interior of the Year, which will be selected on Friday.

Dezeen is media partner for both the World Architecture Festival (WAF) and Inside, which are taking place at Arena Berlin in Germany until 18 November.

Here are the full details of today’s winning interior projects:


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Retail: Black Cant System – HEIKE fashion brand concept store, Hangzhou, China, by Shanwei Weng & Jiadie Yuan/Hangzhou AN Interior Design

This monochrome fashion boutique has a black box at its centre, marking the location of a staircase connecting the two floors.

Other details in the warehouse-like space include fan-shaped handrails, bespoke furniture elements and large mirrors.


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Bars and restaurants: Rachel’s Burger, Shanghai, China, by Neri&Hu

Neri&Hu used bold tiles and stainless steel counter to make this Shanghai restaurant feel like a retro American diner.

Envisaged as “a porous space”, the diner has an angular roof that projects over glazed walls, which can be completely folded away. Other details include custom lighting fittings and communal tables with pivoting benches.


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Offices: Paramount by The Office Space, Sydney, Australia, by Woods Bagot

This adaptive reuse project involved transforming the ground floor of a heritage building in Sydney into a series of 22 work suites.

Walls are lined with timber, while new materials including tan leather, stone and brass help to differentiate between the new and old sections of the interior.

Continue reading Top Interior Design Of 2016 At Day One Of Inside 2016

New Year’s Resolutions For Architecture & Design In 2017

With 2016 coming to an end, Will Wiles doses out his New Year’s resolutions for architecture and design in 2017, which include resisting the hygge trend and finally taking responsibility for the climate.


I suggested New Year’s Resolutions for architecture and design at the end of 2015, and the response was great. So, one year later, I’ve made some more:

1. An end to TED’s glib solutionism

Consider president-elect Donald Trump’s proposed wall to keep out Mexico. It was the most consistent pledge he made during his precedent-smashing election campaign. Trump admitted that it was his secret rhetorical weapon for when he sensed a crowd was getting bored: “I just say, ‘We will build the wall!’ and they go nuts,” he told the New York Times.

The wall is a strong pledge to make: it’s a simple, easy-to-understand design solution to a perceived problem. It’s also crass, offensive and impractical in the extreme, but that didn’t matter to the target audience. They got it. They went nuts.

There was a lot of this in 2016, the year zealots of various stripes promised to sweep away the knotted, stifling problems of globalisation with no more than a wave of the tiny hand. Build the wall, make America great again, drain the swamp, vote leave, take back control.

Architecture and design, which is well populated with experts and systems-thinkers, might regard itself as being apart from all this. But, in fact, one of the throbbing nerve centres of the post-expert, hand-wave era lies closer than you might think: TED, the wildly popular talks series.

TED, of course, presents itself as a hub of expertise and intelligence. And in criticising TED, I don’t mean to denigrate the vast majority of its speakers, or to imply that TED equals Trump, or anything so dim. It’s the format that’s the problem, and the kind of intellectual legerdemain it encourages.

TED is the golden cap of the yaddering pyramid of hackism

TED is the golden cap of the yaddering pyramid of hackism: that every wicked problem has a nifty workaround or backdoor, that it’s all got a glib little design solution that’ll bypass all the waffle and the smoke, and make everything OK. Ted Everyman, outsider genius, has cracked the problem that has the eggheads stumped, and it was so simple.

Trump’s wall is very TED. So is his insistence that generic “smartness” on his part means that he can do without the expert advice previous presidents have relied upon, such as intelligence briefings.

The trouble for democratic opposition to these forces is that complexity and intractability make for very unenticing messages. Even more problematic is the fact that “it’s complicated, let us experts handle it” is the way the globalist managerial class has ushered in many of the problems that Trump and others now claim to have solved.

Where architecture and design might be able to make a difference in the coming months is by shunning hackism and solutionism, and demonstrating instead its remarkable ability to research, explore and expose.

2. Take personal responsibility for the climate

With Trump’s administration stuffed full of climate-change deniers and oil men, concerted international state action to address the warming planet looks unlikely. Worse, existing measures, such as the Paris Agreement that came into force this year, might be in peril. American leadership isn’t essential for progress on the climate, but its active obstruction and wrecking of vital research could be a disastrous setback when renewed effort is needed.

Governments can’t be relied upon to enforce change

The abdication of governments from climate action serves, at least, as a reminder that they can’t be relied upon to enforce change. The long-awaited economic breakthrough of renewable energy has at last arrived: solar is now the word’s cheapest form of energy. Simple economic forces might now drive down carbon emissions while national governments are preoccupied. Texas, a place strongly associated with oil and gas, now gets as much as half of its electricity from wind, and is anticipating a solar boom. China may also be a source of surprises.

These are changes that may yet halt the incipient climate catastrophe: not grandiose treaty-signing, but aggregated individual decisions. Be part of it in what you make and build.

3. Health warnings for the whimsy

Another Trump-related one, sadly. Trump’s victory has also sparked a debate over so-called “fake news”: the growing welter of misinformation, disinformation and scurrilous falsehood online. This risks crowding out more reliable sources of information and overwhelming civil society’s already overtaxed critical faculties.

Again, you might wonder what that has to do with architecture and design. But of course architecture and design has a long history of generating its own “fake news” in the form of the more fanciful speculative proposals and vapourware.

There’s nothing wrong with speculation, paper architecture and design fictions, of course – they’re all useful endeavours and we’d be hugely poorer without them. It suits architecture and design to propose their own forms, as well as to simply deliver the proposals of others.

Architecture and design has a long history of generating its own fake news

Even the grubbier end of that kind of activity isn’t inherently bad. Here I’m talking about the completely senseless floating lilypad cities or vertical farms that get pitched out as blog-fodder for no practical purpose than showing off a designer’s rendering skills and get their name about. They probably belong on Deviantart rather than Dezeen, but no one’s harmed.

Really what’s needed is appropriate labelling: making it clear what is speculation for the purposes of debate, what’s a real proposal that’s seeking backers, what might actually have a chance of actually appearing, and what’s just a bit of hey-look-at-me fun. That’s where the ethics get murky. Remember that Chinese straddling bus concept that turned out to be little more than a scam? Or that kooky London Garden Bridge concept that also turned out to be little more than a scam. Whimsy can be costly, people!

But seriously, knock it off with the floating cities and the vertical farms.

4. Leave “hygge” in 2016

Financial Times critic Edwin Heathcote has already done a sterling job of debunking hygge, the ubiquitous pseudo-Scandinavian lifestyle craze. Like many ubiquitous lifestyle crazes, it’s a subtle blend of total common sense (fires are nice in winter) and complete balderdash.

Anyway, it’s upon us now and resistance is futile – the tie-in books have already been given as presents, and they already sit amid the Christmas wreckage of many, many living rooms. And I’m sure they look harmless enough. So it’s time for a word of warning.

The Guardian’s Charlotte Higgins has already shown how hygge was confected within the publishing industry. I think the part played by architecture and design has been understated, though. For a start, the sector has done much to import interest in Scandinavian lifestyles by importing lots of Scandinavian people. No one in their right mind would think this was anything other than a tremendous boon, and I can only apologise to my Scandinavian friends and colleagues for the way Britain is presently making a travesty of their culture. That, and Brexit.

Let’s not do hygge urbanism. The temptation will be strong, and you must resist

It truly has been a terrible year. Architecture – specifically, architecture publishing – was also making something of a fetish of things hygge before hygge was a thing, with its recent boom in cabins and log piles. I attribute this more to an interest in consumer survivalism, rather than Danish culture, but nevertheless “cabin porn” was very much the gateway.

Anyway, here’s the warning. Already, thoughts will be turning to next year’s endeavours, and fun ways to present them to the public. The eye will blearily cast around the living room for ideas. Thanks to architects from Jan Gehl to Bjarke Ingels, the Danish way of making cities is already rightly praised and emulated. But let’s not do hygge urbanism. The temptation will be strong, and you must resist. No hygge placemaking. I beg of you. Just don’t.

Continue reading New Year’s Resolutions For Architecture & Design In 2017

This Children’s Shoe Store Was Designed For Restless Kids

Spanish studio Clap designed a vibrant shoe store interior specifically for playful children

ANNA JOHANSSON

  • 14 FEBRUARY 2018

Getting children to sit through a shoe fitting can be a challenge. Clap, a Spanish branding and interior design studio, believes it found the answer to this parenting problem with a concept children’s footwear store, Little Stories. The team used geometry, bright colors and imaginative design to make purchasing shoes a playful occasion rather than a chore.

Continue reading This Children’s Shoe Store Was Designed For Restless Kids