Advertisements

Tag Archives: design

Interior Designers On The Design Trends They Hate Most

 

Bathrooms don't look like this anymore for a reason.

Bathrooms don’t look like this anymore for a reason.

GETTY

Have you seen a new bathroom built with glass bricks in the past decade? Probably not. That’s because although glass brick bathrooms were trendy thirty years ago, at some point, interior design professionals made an unofficial collective decision that they looked hideous.

The same will eventually be said for many of the current design trends that have become almost painfully ubiquitous. Just because a look is heavily featured on social media or HGTV, doesn’t mean it’s a good choice for everyone from an aesthetic or even a practicality standpoint. From tropical print overload to Live, Laugh, Love art, some of the biggest names in interior design gladly confessed their least favorite trends as well as the alternatives that make better replacements.

Midcentury Modern Design

We're closer to the middle of the century.

We’re closer to the middle of the next century.

PIXABAY

It feels as if mid-century modern furniture and design has been a trend for the better part of the current century, even if it has probably been closer to a decade. While Shabby Chic founder Rachel Ashwell loves the minimal and simple clean lines of this style, overall, she isn’t a fan. “Even on clean lines, I always like things to be comfortable,” she says.

But if you’re stuck in a house full of wood furniture with angled feet, Ashwell doesn’t think the situation is hopeless. “Comfy cushions and accents of romantic flowers I feel would have made this trend more liveable.”

Skinny Flat Cushions On Oversized Sofas

Ashwell thinks bigger is better when it comes to cushions.

Ashwell thinks bigger is better when it comes to cushions.

PHOTO BY IVA PRIME FROM PEXELS

Ashwell is a proponent of comfort in design, which makes sense because who wants to sit on something that’s uncomfortable? After all, the designer is known for creating oversized sofas with large, cloud-like cushions. “The streamlined aesthetics of oversized sofas with very thin cushions always seemed odd and uncomfortable to me, giving the feeling of an enormous dog bed,” she says. “I feel the diversity of tastes and styles of sofas from traditional to modern, should still be comfortable and inviting. Skinny flat seat cushions are never a substitute for a comfy seat.”

Icy Gray Interior Colors

Grey as a cloudy sky.

Gray as a cloudy sky.

IMAGE BY GERBEN DE JONG FROM PIXABAY

Cool-toned gray paint and furniture might be having a moment, but Andrea DeRosa and Ashley Manhan of Avenue Interior Design are watching the clock. They can’t wait for this trend to freeze over.

But that doesn’t mean the interior design duo is anti-gray all together. If you’re looking for a true gray, they suggest making sure there is a small amount of red or an undertone to the color. “Looking to embrace an up-and-coming trend? Go with finishes that are more of a taupe based ‘French Gray.’ French grays are very versatile and have more warmth to them than cool or warm grays,” they explain.

Kitchy Phrases And Letter Blocking As Artwork

Get inspired to find new artwork.

Get inspired to find something else.

PHOTO BY TY WILLIAMS ON UNSPLASH

Art should always have a message, but DeRosa and Manhan believe it’s okay to search for that meaning. They would be happy never seeing another inspirational message again. “Whether you’re telling a guest to ‘relax’ or trying to communicate a sense of ‘home-sweet-home,’ there are countless ways you can do so in a more subtle way,” they say.

The designers suggest creating context and a sense of place through the use of photography, color or pattern. “This allows each guest to craft their own experience and make the overall vibe for the interior more timeless.”

Kitchens With No Upper Wall Cabinets

A design choice that will leave you with less storage and more to clean.

A design choice that will leave you with less storage and more to clean.

GETTY

Kitchens that lack upper wall cabinetry are highly impractical according to Alexis Rodgers of Home With Alexis. Shorter cabinets mean the only thing you can store in the space is dust.“Keeping a kitchen tidy can be challenging enough, and I don’t need or want the additional challenge of where-to-store-my-dishes-and-stash-this-ugly-mug added to my daily routine,” the interior designer confesses.

Rodgers likes the warmth, balance, and function that upper wall cabinets provide. They’re also a necessity if the kitchen has a range hood. “The range hood with no wall companions can look both imposing and incomplete, floating by itself on the otherwise barren wall. Of course, there are exceptions that make this trend look fabulous, but the ones I have seen in real life leave me wanting more-namely, more cabinetry,” she explains.

Exposed Kitchen Shelving

A perfect shelfie. An imperfect trend.

A perfect shelfie. An imperfect trend.

GETTY

Rodgers truly dikes replacing traditional cabinetry with open shelving. This design choice might be ideal for social media posts, but not real life. “This wall-to-wall, open-shelf concept feels too much like a retail store showcasing its sale items, and it can create anxiety in having to curate or maintain the perfect shelfie at all times,” she says.

At one point, Rodgers installed open shelving in her kitchen, but ultimately regretted it. “I know from personal experience, as I eventually removed the floating shelves in my own kitchen and never looked back.”

Want to mix it up? Go for a combination of solid wood and glass-front cabinetry instead. “The glass doors give you the airiness of open shelving without the dust and chaos,” she says.

Clean Minimal Interiors

Pretty but cold.

Pretty but cold.

PHOTO BY RAHULCHAKRABORTY ON UNSPLASH

Founder of Dazey LA, Danielle Nagel, is sick of seeing clean, minimal interiors everywhere, “They are so boring and lack life and interest,” she says. “To me, it just feels like cheating to leave things basically blank and call it a day.”

But that doesn’t mean going the opposite way entirely. As an alternative, Nagel recommends incorporating subtle colors such as warm ochre, dusty gold, or light pink into a design scheme. “An accent wall or a few warm accessories can really make a space feel so much cozier while still remaining simple.”

Tile Countertops

Tiles on the wall. Not on the countertop!

Tiles on the wall. Not on the countertop!

STOCKSNAP

There are so many places to use tile, but according to Cliff Webster, who is the General Manager of Tile for Wayfair, countertops are not one of them. “While countertop tile may have gone out of style, patterns are in! Use patterned tile to create on-trend (and moisture resistant) accent walls, backsplashes and floors. Wayfair has thousands of options available. Some of the brand’s best sellers are the PalomaArtea and Encausto.”

While tile can be an affordable choice for countertops, that doesn’t make it a good choice. This material just looks dated and will certainly turn off potential buyers when it comes time to sell your home.

Flush Mount Ceiling Lights

These fixtures hardly light up a room.

These fixtures hardly light up a room.

PHOTO BY MILLY EATON FROM PEXELS

Kelly Aaron, who is the Chief Luminary of Blueprint Lighting, sees certain flush mount fixtures (known to some as boob lights for their resemblance to the female anatomy) as one of the worst possible design choices to make. “There is so much good design in the world at every conceivable price point that bad design shouldn’t exist anymore,” she says. “I look at these lights and see a missed opportunity to place something sculptural, add a pop of color or tell a little story. They are a cop out.”

Standard flush mounts are also impractical, Aaron explains. “To add insult to injury, it is also obscenely difficult to change a bulb in one of these things—just a poor design all around. Plus, they look like a boob. But not a sexy boob. A boob you wish you could un-see.”

But there are alternatives, she says. “Obviously, it depends on the scale of the space. But if something comparably small-scale is needed, our Strobus flush mount is a fabulous option. It packs a serious design punch and provides a ton of visual interest and texture in a compact little package.”

For a larger scale project, Aaron recommends the Counterbalance light from Blueprint both for its design and the fact that the light bulb is easy to change. “If the room can handle something of a larger scale, our Counterbalance is a knockout! We were inspired by the mobiles of Alexander Calder when designing Counterbalance. It’s a light that doubles as a sculpture.”

White Everything

Too much white.

Too much white.

GETTY

Mike Russell, CEO of Paintzen is bored of monochromatic white rooms. “There’s such an attachment to all white everywhere—from walls to ceilings to furniture,” he says. “While we understand the desire for a fresh, clean look, it lacks originality. With thousands of paint color options, you can certainly find something that feels as clean as pure white, like rich blues or sage greens, but lends a little more personality.”

Popcorn Ceilings

Popcorn is for snacking, not ceilings. 

Popcorn is for snacking, not ceilings.

GETTY

Meghan Stewart, Senior Director of Residential and Certified Color Consultant for Paintzen truly dislikes popcorn ceilings. “Their sticky texture adds a weird dynamic to rooms with an otherwise soft, clean look. If you want to make your ceiling stand out, we recommend adding some color and treating it like your fifth wall. It can still be eye-catching, without the rigid finish,” she says.

Tropical Print Overload

Use sparingly.

Use sparingly.

GETTY

Tropical designs such as banana and palm leaf prints are having a long moment. But many people are going overboard. There is a fine line between the touch of sophistication it can add versus looking like the jungle exploded.

Tropical prints were highly popular in design a few years ago,” says Jennifer Matthews, who is the Creative Director and Co-Founder of Tempaper. “While tropical influences still play a role, they have evolved into a more refined scenic aesthetic that tells a story. Utopia, Tempaper’s first panoramic mural, is an excellent example of this.”

There are lots of ways to incorporate tropical print. Perhaps an accent wall, linen napkins or accessorizing with pillows. It’s easy to go overboard, but try to resist temptation.

Stainless Steel Appliances

Color would be better.

Color would be better.

PHOTO BY RUSTIC VEGAN ON UNSPLASH

For more than a decade, stainless steel has been the standard for appliances. But many feel this look is getting old. Orion Creamer, who is the Founder of Big Chill, which manufactures colorful and retro style appliances says, “There’s nothing exciting or individualized about [the stainless steel appliance trend].”

He feels that custom color choices whether they’re matte black, cherry red, or even orange can make a much larger impact than stainless steel. “Colorful appliances create a space that feels unique and mirrors the style of the homeowner most accurately. It’s for this reason that here at Big Chill, we are extending our custom color offerings with premium color offerings to appeal to even more aesthetic preferences,” he says.

Continue reading Interior Designers On The Design Trends They Hate Most

Advertisements

Rottet Studio Makes Design the Star at the Los Angeles Office of Paradigm

PROJECT NAME Paradigm
LOCATION Los Angeles
FIRM Rottet Studio
SQ. FT. 82,000 SQF

“Light and movement.” That’s what Sam Gores said he wanted to see upon entering his office in Los Angeles. And when the chairman and CEO of Paradigm Talent Agencyasks for something, that is precisely what he gets—particularly when the project is designed by Rottet Studio. Interior Design Hall of Fame member Lauren Rottet’s firm is itself a fixture in the entertainment business, with credits including offices for United Talent Agency and Viacom.

A custom reception desk in folded and welded mirror-polished stainless-steel stands on engineered European white-oak floor planks at Rottet Studio’s Los Angeles office for Paradigm Talent Agency. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

A powerhouse with eight locations across the U.S. as well as in Toronto and London, Paradigm “understood that architecture does matter,” Rottet Studio founding principal Richard Riveire begins. “They really get that an agency can leapfrog over competitors by bringing everyone under one roof, giving them a great place to work, and making sure that conversations and impromptu meetings happen.” So, employees from the music, literary, film, and TV divisions, previously at three separate L.A. sites, are now together in Beverly Hills.

Milo Baughman–inspired chairs face a leather-covered sofa in the green room. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Notable for a landmark fountain, a monumental pyramid, standing in the front courtyard, the 1980s building had a storied past as the former home of the agency ICM Partners but had been vacant for seven years. Though Riveire and principal Harout Dedeyan term their intervention there “tenant improvement,” that’s just Rottet Studio’s typically understated manner. We call the project a complete gut job, with only the limestone and granite wall cladding and the skylight retained. The 82,000-square-foot U-shape interior was entirely rebuilt. Plus, the courtyard, which previously “leaked like a sieve,” Riveire says, was repaved and replanted around the pyramid.

Rising from reception’s sitting area, stairs offer additional seating on vinyl-covered cushions. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The greatest challenge was “to figure out new ways of working inside a 30-year-old building,” Riveire continues. “By jamming things together, we could create an exciting design that changes all the time.” The device that “moved the throttle setting toward more common spaces,” he explains, was the insertion of a central stair atrium—obviously the big move. “We had to whack out 1,000 square feet on two of the floors.” 

A Greg Bogin artwork was commissioned for a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

No mere grand staircase, this. It’s not only the people connector between the three levels but also a multitasker. The lower, wider flight can serve as a vertical space for solo work, thanks to the  blocky cushions scattered across the steps, or as a venue for all-hands company meetings, when combined with the reception area and an adjacent conference room.

On three, the reception area features an armless chair by Karim Rashid. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Flights aren’t stacked but slightly rotated inside circular openings that differ in size—difficult to engineer, to say the least. “LED halos accentuate the perimeters,” Dedeyan says. The ensemble presents quite a climb, especially for those with vertigo. A mirrored ceiling produces a dizzying kaleidoscope effect, making the height appear as six stories, not three.

The courtyard’s new granite, concrete, and turf surfaces surround an existing Eric Orr pyramid fountain. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Sharing dramatic creds is the reception desk. Riveire, who’s highly knowledgeable about hospitality projects, too, compares it to “the front desk of a hotel.” He goes on to liken the long, purposely low form in mirror-polished stainless steel to “a squished pickle.” We see inspirations of sculptures by Anish Kapoor. Regardless, it’s an Instagram moment.

Erik Parker’s acrylic collage on canvas punctuates a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Speaking of art, there’s no shortage of spectacular pieces, some of them commissioned. Initiated by Gores, the program was assembled by a DJ-curator, DB Burkeman, in collaboration with a more conventional art consultant. Standouts include the atrium’s colorful text-based screen prints, kinetic black-and-white photographs of figures in the elevator lobbies, and a corridor’s collage inspired by comic books, hip-hop, and graffiti.

Nylon carpet in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Surprisingly, knowing Rottet Studio as we do, furnishings are generally not custom. Widely available residential pieces, they could be found in many a stylish living room. Flooring, consistent with that vibe, is white-oak planks in common spaces. “The wood is a contrast to all that stone on the walls,” Riveire explains.

The listening room is acoustically isolated. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Carpeted work spaces follow the customary setup. Glass-fronted private offices for agents face assistants at a benching system. Most offices have sit-stand desks. (Many in the stand position during our visit.) Sprinkled among the offices are casual lounges, up for grabs as needed. What’s unusual is the lack of hierarchy among divisions. No single one ranks above any other.

The stair atrium’s mirror-finished stretched mem­brane ceiling reflects a series of 21 screen prints by Eve Fowler. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Conference and meeting rooms and the “signing rooms” encircle the stair atrium. Really, though, everything is an ad hoc meeting space, including  elevator lobbies fitted out with chic and super-comfy seating. There are also pantries and coffee bars aplenty, the best, no doubt, being the ground level’s coffee lounge opening onto the courtyard. Pull up a stool to the marble counter, or plop down on a sofa or armchairs anchored by a houndstooth rug that blends with the same pattern rendered in floor tile.

Reception’s custom wool-silk rug. Photography by Eric Laignel.

The list of amenities goes on: a screening room with adjacent green room, another room filled with candy. According to Paradigm director of special services and guest relations Rozzana Ramos, clients come just to hang out. Linger long enough, and you might spot Antonio Banderas or Henry Golding reading a script or Chris Martin, Ed Sheeren, or Sia headed to the listening room where, Riveire says, they can “crank it up to 11.” 

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

LED halos ringing the stair atrium. Photography by Eric Laignel.
A corridor’s con­struction of album covers with wood and resin by David Ellis. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lounge on two. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Patricia Urquiola chairs appear in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Damien Hirst’s deck for Supreme is mounted with other skateboards in an office area. Photography by Eric Laignel.
In the coffee lounge, a focal wall includes artwork by Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Laser-printed photographs by Kenton Parker energize an elevator lobby. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lacquered logo wall on a granite base. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Project Team: Chris Jones; Theresa Lee; Pegah Koulaeian, Laurence Cartledge: Rottet Studio. Esquared Lighting: Lighting Consultant. Newson Brown Acoustics: Acoustical Consultant. Cybola Systems Corporation: Audio-Visual Consultant. Lendrum Fine Art: Art Consultant. Thornton Tomasetti: Structural Engineer. Arc Engineering: MEP. AMA Project Management: Project Manager. Clune Con­struc­tion Company: General Contractor.

Product Sources: From Front: AM Cabinets: Custom Desk (Recep­tion). Palecek: Coffee Table (Green Room). RH: Chairs, Sofa (Green Room), Sofa (Listening Room). CB2: Console (Green Room), Side Tables (Hall), Sofa, Coffee Table (Lounge), Table (Office), Dining Chairs (Coffee Lounge). Tai Ping Carpets: Custom Rug (Sitting Area). Davis Furniture: Sofas. Holly Hunt: Chairs. West Elm: Side Tables (Lounge, Coffee Lounge, Reception Area). Martin Brattrud: Cushions (Stairway). Blu Dot: Benches (Hall), Stools (Atrium), Credenza (Listening Room), Sofa (Reception Area). Summer Classics: Chairs (Court­Yard). Andreu World: Chairs (Office). Alur: Storefront Sys­tem. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams: Coffee Table (Coffee Lounge). Gus Modern: Sofa. Shaw Hospitality: Rug. Andreu World: Barstools. Thomas O’Brien: Pendant Fixture. Zuo Modern: Chairs (Coffee Lounge), Chairs, Table (Listening Room). Tandus: Rug (Reception Area). Nienkamper: Chair. H.D. Buttercup: Armchairs. West Elm: White Side Table. Bernhardt Design: Bench. Throughout: Monarch Plank: Floor Planks. Bentley: Carpet. Barrisol: Stretched Ceiling Membrane. Benjamin Moore & Co.; Dunn-Edwards Corporation: Paint.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

How to design a stylish and multifunctional garage

What if your home had a spare room you’d never noticed before? Your garage, even if it has one or more cars in it, can pull double-duty as a gym, a crafting room and even a place to socialize.

Designers and architects tell us that gaining more living space without putting an addition on your house can make the effort worthwhile, even if it means investing in things like upgraded lighting, flooring and heating.

We shouldn’t be “treating the garage as a big box,” says Bethesda, Maryland-based architect Jim Rill. “Make it another room. It’s a lost opportunity if you don’t.”

Marina Case, founder of the Warwick, New York-based design firm The Red Shutters, agrees: “A garage,” she says, “can be anything you need it to be.”

We’ve asked Rill, Case and interior designer Anna Maria Mannarino of New Jersey-based Mannarino Designs for advice on creating a well-organized garage that can also function as a flexible spare room.

FLOORS AND WALLS

Upgrading the look and feel of your garage can start at the bottom: Paint the floor, says Case.

Painting a cement floor a dark taupe or gray can have a big impact, she says, or choose an even bolder color. “You’ll feel like you’re in this fresh, fun space,” she says.

But do test the color by painting a piece of foam core that’s at least a few square feet, she says, and leaving it on the garage floor for a few days to make sure you like it.

Another option: Showroom flooring is available for as little as $5 per foot, says Rill. And if you won’t be parking cars in the garage and are instead using it as a “man cave or a she-shed,” Mannarino says, consider upgrading the flooring with something you’d normally use inside the house.

Walls come next: “Why is the garage always just a drywall box?” Rill asks.

If your garage walls aren’t sheet-rocked, Mannarino says you can add that and give it a coat of paint. Or put up paneling, Rill says, making it easier to hang items like rakes or hoses. You can add a flat hanging system that includes space for hanging baskets and brackets for shelves. Many closet-design brands offer flat systems that will hold heavy outdoor items.

If you prefer freestanding storage along the walls, add several tall, sturdy shelving units. You can line them with large, clear bins neatly labeled, or fancier storage bins, Case says.

Or go an extra step and have built-in cabinetry installed.

And if your garage ceiling is high and has ample space away from where the garage door opens, consider adding storage on the ceiling, Mannarino says.

“It gives you that much more real estate,” she says. But don’t cut corners: Have ceiling shelving or storage racks mounted properly by a professional.

If your garage gets cold in the winter, you can add a separate heating system that’s inexpensive to run. These “mini-split” heating systems can be turned on only when you’re spending time in the garage. Adding insulation also helps control the climate, making the garage feel more like an indoor room.

And don’t settle for a bare bulb in the ceiling. Replacing it with a larger, more attractive fixture can dramatically change the way a garage feels.

ENTERTAINING OPTIONS

Although it’s common to have a workshop in a garage, and many people use the space for messy crafting projects or as a home gym, a garage can also become an entertainment space.

If you’re a car enthusiast who works on a vintage car or hotrod, Rill says, why not use part of your garage as a place to hang out with friends talking about cars?

Case suggests adding a bar area with comfortable seating, even if it’s small, to make the garage an inviting place to hang out with guests. You can also hang up a flat-screen TV and add a refrigerator.

Rill has a vintage cooler, reclaimed from a supermarket, in his garage for soft drinks, water and beer. It’s used all summer when the family is outdoors.

Along with year-round entertaining inside a garage, these designers point out that an open garage can be a great place to set up a buffet table during an outdoor summer party.

Case suggests adding ceiling-mounted tracks for curtains in an indoor/outdoor material like Sunbrella, so you can draw them behind a serving table in your open garage.

Barn doors or other types of upgraded garage door can make the space more attractive and accessible during parties.

And upgrading your garage door does more than just add beauty to the exterior of your home, Mannarino says. It also gives you the option of adding more windows, bringing natural light into your garage.

ADVERTISING

IS THERE AN ATTIC?

Many detached garages have a tiny second-floor attic or loft space, Rill says. Even if its ceiling is low, that space can become a furnished clubhouse for younger kids, a place to practice musical instruments or even a cozy guest suite.

On one garage project, Rill replaced the solid wooden ceiling in a large detached garage with a perforated metal floor. That gave added natural light to the attic space above, which was then transformed into a kids’ clubhouse.

The Seattle Times does not append comment threads to stories from wire services such as the Associated Press, The New York Times, The Washington Post or Bloomberg News. Rather, we focus on discussions related to local stories by our own staff. You can read more about our community policies here.
Latest in Explore
ADVERTISING
00:07
02:14

Powered by Minute Media powered-by-strip

ASID Press Release

ASID and DIFFA Announce Design Impacts Life Fund

Industry-Leading Organizations Partner as ASID Creates $375,000 Grant Fund

The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) is excited to announce a donation of $375,000 to DIFFA: Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS, creating the new Design Impacts Life Fund. The Fund will offer grants to nonprofits that provide services, education, and treatment to those affected by HIV/AIDS, with the potential to expand its reach to support others in need. This donation represents one of the largest single gifts ever to DIFFA.

The gift comes from the ASID Benevolent Fund, which was started in 1974 by ASID members to provide funds to those in need in the design community during the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. ASID paused fundraising for the Benevolent Fund when DIFFA was launched as a larger design industry focused organization. This donation closes the chapter on the ASID Benevolent Fund and opens opportunity for DIFFA to increase its organizational impact and reach. The ASID Design Impacts Life Fund will be leveraged to create the greatest possible impact on those living with HIV/AIDS and the DIFFA organization. Thanks to the national reach of both ASID and DIFFA, potential grantees may apply from all over the country.

“ASID is passionate about positively impacting lives beyond the practice of design,” states Randy Fiser, Hon. FASID, ASID CEO. “This profession is made up of diverse individuals whose shared goal is to make the world better for its inhabitants. Our new Design Impacts Life Fund speaks to our mission: to touch lives thanks to the power of design. We’re thrilled to give back to such a worthy cause and can’t wait to see how together with DIFFA and the entire design community, we can make a difference in people’s lives.”

In addition to its grant support, the Design Impacts Life Fund will leverage the combined power of ASID and DIFFA to spur the industry to action. Through their various programs and partners, the two organizations will continue to broaden the scope of the fund to inspire support from the design world and maximize its effect on all communities in need.

“With the generous donation from ASID—a huge thanks!—and DIFFA’s strong network of design professionals behind it, the Design Impacts Life Fund has so much potential to help HIV/AIDS-affected communities,” says Cindy Allen, Interior Design magazine’s Editor-in-Chief and DIFFA’s Chair of the Board of Trustees. “DIFFA remains as committed as ever to helping those in need and galvanizing our community to push the boundaries of what is possible.”

Adds Dawn Roberson, DIFFA Executive Director, “We are thrilled to start the Design Impacts Life Fund with this most generous donation from ASID! These funds, combined with the continued generosity of the design community, will contribute significantly to DIFFA’s granting for years to come. We could not possibly be more grateful to partner with ASID in such a meaningful way.”

In the U.S., 80 percent of the interior design community is female, and Hispanic and Latin women are among the most affected by HIV/AIDS. The CDC estimates that roughly 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV – and nearly one in eight of those are not aware that they are infected. Increasing levels of intravenous drug use, linked to an epidemic of opioid misuse, are threatening the gains made on reducing HIV among people who use drugs. HIV-related stigma remains a huge barrier to preventing HIV and is linked to the low number of people who receive HIV testing, as well as poor adherence to treatment, particularly among young people.

Both ASID and DIFFA have a rich history of helping others. ASID provides monetary support through the ASID Foundation, which advances the profession and communicates the ability of interior design to enhance the human experience through research, scholarships, and education. In addition to its fundraising and volunteer events, DIFFA has granted more than $44 million to support nonprofit organizations across the country supporting HIV/AIDS.

The Design Impacts Life Fund was officially announced at the annual NYCxDesign Awards on Monday, May 20, 2019 at New York’s Pier 17. Both the Society and DIFFA will continue promotion of the fund through their various annual programs.

About ASID

The American Society of Interior Designers believes that design transforms lives. ASID serves the full range of the interior design profession and practice through the Society’s programs, networks, and advocacy. We thrive on the strength of cross-functional and interdisciplinary relationships among designers of all specialties, including workplace, healthcare, retail and hospitality, education, institutional, and residential. We lead interior designers in shared conversations around topics that matter: from evidence-based and human-centric design to social responsibility, well-being, and sustainability. We showcase the impact of design on the human experience and the value interior designers provide.

ASID was founded over 40 years ago when two organizations became one, but its legacy dates back to the early 1930s. As we celebrate nearly 85 years of industry leadership, we are leading the future of interior design, continuing to integrate the advantages of local connections with national reach, of small firms with big, and of the places we live with the places we work, play, and heal. Learn more at asid.org.

About DIFFA

DIFFA: Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS raises awareness and grants funds to organizations that fight HIV/AIDS by providing treatment and direct care services for people living with or impacted by the disease, offering preventative education programs targeted to populations at risk of infection, or supporting public policy initiatives. DIFFA is one of the largest funders of HIV/AIDS service and education programs in the United States, mobilizing the immense resources and creativity of the design community. Since its founding in 1984, DIFFA has emerged from a grassroots organization into a national foundation based in New York City with chapters and community partners across the country that, working together, have provided more than $43 million to hundreds of HIV/AIDS organizations nationwide. www.diffa.org.

MEDIA CONTACT

Joseph G. Cephas
jcephas@asid.org

Continue reading ASID Press Release

Lyric, the rental conversion startup, talks value of design

The living room of a 3 bed, 3 bath Lyric unit in New Orleans. (Courtesy Lyric)

Reconfiguring residential units into hospitality spaces isn’t exactly what home sharing service Airbnb is known for, but it certainly aligns with their mission. That might explain why the company was the lead investor in a funding round last monththat netted $160 million for the startup Lyric.

Lyric, founded in 2014, operates in 13 cities across the U.S. After leasing units in apartment buildings, the company renovates and restyles them for travelers with a suite of amenities. Lyric finely balances between styling its units as hospitality-minded spaces and livable apartments; it recognizes that while some travelers may use their rentals as “crash pads,” others might stay for a longer term and want to explore the culture of their host city.

AN Interior recently sat down with Nicole Bernstein, senior director of experience design, and Ravi Hampole, vice president of brand and design, to discuss the challenges, advantages, and design inspiration that drive Lyric.

Check out the full story on our new interiors site, aninteriormag.com.

RELATED STORIES

Continue reading Lyric, the rental conversion startup, talks value of design

How To Design Your Bedroom For A Better Night’s Sleep

The secret to a better night's sleep starts in the bedroom.

The secret to a better night’s sleep starts in the bedroom.

THE INSIDE

According to the American Sleep Association, insomnia is the most common specific sleep disorder with 30% of adults reporting short-term insomnia and 10% reporting chronic insomnia. Terry Cralle, RN, is a certified Clinical Sleep Educator and certified in Clinical Sleep Health. She is also the co-author of Sleeping Your Way To The Top as well as children’s book Snoozby and the Great Big Bedtime Battle. She says, “The quality of life you lead largely depends on how well you sleep at night.”

There are many factors that can contribute to sleep issues. But no matter the diagnosis, Cralle believes our bedrooms can be part of the problem and that re-evaluating our sleeping spaces can be a drug-free way to treat insomnia.

Put Sleep First

Less is more sleep.

Less is more sleep.

HOME WITH ALEXIS / DEVIN CAMPBELL PHOTOGRAPHY

Cralle believes bedrooms should only have two purposes—sleep and sex. Anything else can potentially affect our health negatively.

The first step of auditing a bedroom for optimal rest is to remove anything we don’t need because clutter can cause stress and anxiety. This even includes items we store under the bed. “Even though it’s out of sight, it’s still distracting. If you are short on storage space, only store sleep-related items there (bed sheets, linens, and pillows),” Cralle says.

Remove excessive books, electronics, unfolded laundry, exercise equipment, stacks of bills and other work. Neaten up any objects that must be left out.

Nightstands also tend to be used for storage. Cralle says to make sure your nightstands have cabinets or drawers to minimize visual clutter. “Limit the nightstand surface to a lamp, photo, book or journal and water carafe.”

Continue reading How To Design Your Bedroom For A Better Night’s Sleep

ASID Events

NATIONAL
MAY
19
ICFF

DESCRIPTION

ICFF is North America’s platform for global design. Over 900 exhibitors from across the globe showcase what’s best and what’s next for luxury interior design to more than 38,000 design industry attendees each year in New York.

 

DATE AND TIME

8:00 AM
5/19/2019 – 5/22/2019

LOCATION

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
655 W. 34th St.
New York, NY 10001
United States

SHARE

 

ICFF offers an unparalleled opportunity to view innovative design trends from across the globe and experience interactive, educational programming led by the industry’s leading designers and icons. Architects, interior designers, visual merchandisers, and developers visit ICFF each year for inspiration and concepts to apply in their next design project.

HIGHLIGHTS OF ICFF

  • ICFF Talks
    Positioned on the show floor, ICFF Talks features design visionaries and leaders who share insight and knowledge as it relates to the interior design world
  • ICFF Studio
    In its 14th year, ICFF and Bernhardt Design bring the next crop of emerging designers to the forefront through the juried ICFF Studio competition
  • NYCxDESIGN Awards & Party
    Presented by Interior Design Magazine and ICFF, the NYCxDESIGN Awards & Party is a highlight of NYCxDESIGN, New York’s annual celebration of design that attracts hundreds of thousands of attendees and designers from across the globe

ASID AT ICFF

ASID is thrilled to showcase the impact of design at ICFF, engage with visitors, and explore the beautiful, impactful, and sometimes surprising ways that design impacts lives. We’ll also provide timely and relevant education sessions each day.

 

Sunday, May 19

12 – 1 p.m. Aging in Place in an Urban Environment: New Design Solutions
Speakers: TBD

How do we design housing to accommodate multiple generations with different needs, incorporating cutting-edge solutions for flexibility and accessibility? Learn how multi-family and community housing in urban environments is evolving to reflect new family structures and an aging population. You’ll come away with practical ideas to help you create flexible living spaces to fit and adapt to the current trends of universal and accessible design.

Monday, May 20

12 – 1 p.m. Creating Purpose-Driven Spaces: What Does it Look Like to Leverage Design for Good?
Speaker: Meena Krenek, ASID, LEED BD+C

Human emotion is uniquely tied to human behavior. An individual’s emotional connection to a space, environment, or culture can provide a strong sense of belonging. This is valuable for developing engagement within spaces we design. As designers, we have the ability to impact behaviors through our design decisions. We must be mindful of this power as we seek a deeper meaning, experience, or contribution to society with our work. It’s important to continuously understand our audience and build spaces that represent a greater purpose and relationship to the activities that happen within, inspiring users and reaching their hearts and minds. In today’s world, everything is so highly competitive and constantly evolving that when designers create purpose-driven spaces, they develop a level of captivation and engagement with the environment which sets them apart.

Meena Krenek, ASID, LEED BD+C

Read more

Tuesday, May 21

12 – 1 p.m. Business Skills for Creatives: What You Need to Know About Contracts and Fees
Speaker: Phyllis Harbinger, ASID, NCIDQ, CID

The contract between you and your client is a legal document, and plays a critical role in setting the tone and establishing yourself as a professional. Every contract includes a section on Designer Compensation, and we’ll show you how to effectively present your fee structure to reflect the true value of your design services, giving you guidelines and tips so that you can maximize profits. Gain insight and strategies to help you establish the right price point for your creative skills, services, and design vision – ensuring business profitability and success.

Phyllis Harbinger, ASID, NCIDQ, CID

Read more

THE ASID DESIGN IMPACT AWARDS

The ASID DESIGN IMPACT Awards recognize innovative products that put people and the environment at the center of design intent. Winning products will be featured by exhibitors at ICFF.

Continue reading ASID Events

Proportion and Symmetry in Interior Design

Choosing the right television for your home isn’t just about budget – it’s more about proportions, placement and psychology

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, 20 April 2018 – Interior design isn’t just about placing a few pieces of furniture in a room – there needs to be enough space to move around comfortably. The proportions of a room in relation to the pieces in it make a person feel either comfortable or unsettled. According to Gestalt Psychology[i], although the human eyes take in separate pieces of information, the brain merges those pieces into a singular, simpler pattern that’s recognisable. This means that a room is seen as a whole before details begin to emerge. Balanced or symmetrical designs are easier for the brain to recognise and are therefore perceived to be more comfortable.

Continue reading Proportion and Symmetry in Interior Design

Say Hello to Japandi (The Minimalist Design Trend You’ve Been Waiting For)

There is a design trend for the minimalist in many of us that is starting to gain momentum. Japandi is a company that has brought the designs and aesthetics From Scandinavian and Japanese design together in a uniquely fitting modern era design. Through the images provided in this article one can not only see the potential of this trend but the many creative combinations that may spring from it as well some would say. The article explains how this merger of concepts came about as well as what the company Japandi is all about and what they wish to accomplish.

Key Takeaways:

  • A color palette within this style category should be comprised of colors that contrast one another
  • In terms of furniture items to select for this aesthetic, the items chosen should reflect both sources of the hybrid
  • Accessorizing well will be key to pulling off the look, and the decor that is chosen should create a statement within the room

“This hybrid aesthetic combines the modern-rustic vibe of Scandinavian — or Nordic — designs with the traditional elegance that’s associated with Japanese styles.”

Read more: https://freshome.com/japandi-trend/

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

TOP 5 BENEFITS OF WAYFINDING IN DESIGN

Designers take note: This is a call to action to suspend the guessing game when it comes to implementing a wayfinding program. It’s not enough to just design beautiful assets, effective typography, and color schemes. Today, designers must think and act like strategists to enable overall success, end-user happiness, and project longevity.

Continue reading TOP 5 BENEFITS OF WAYFINDING IN DESIGN

%d bloggers like this: