Tag Archives: Denmark

Danish Company Creates The World’s Most Creative Playgrounds That’ll Make You Want To Be A Kid Again

LEGO aren’t the only Danish engineers inviting kids to celebrate their imagination. One Danish company is building creative one-of-a-kind playgrounds, and they’re every kid’s dream.

MONSTRUM, founded by former theater set designers Ole Barslund Nielsen and Christian Jensen, has been making elaborate and whimsical playgrounds since 2003. From a giant electric eel swirling around a lighthouse to a princess’ tower and a rocket ship mashup – these imaginative playgrounds are inviting children to play in Denmark, Sweden, Egypt, and other countries.

Scroll down, and let us know in the comments which one of these thematic playgrounds you’d want in your back yard.

More info: monstrum.dk (h/t: insiderboredpanda)

#1 Liseberg

Welcome to our playground in Liseberg, Tivoli in Gothenburg! Swing in gigantic nets and climb as high as you dare (adults might be tempted too), and enjoy close encounters with solar reflections and giant birds.

#2 The Crooked Houses

Back in the days in 1800-something, when Brumleby was located in the countryside there was a dairy and a slaughterhouse at Brumleby. The idea of the playground is to create a piece of this old Brumleby to remind us of its fantastic history.

#3 Odense Zoo

The story takes place on the African savannah. The Lion Chunga lies comfortably, hiding from the small goats and dreaming of his next meal. Behind the grass, you will see a glimpse of the old hut in the trees with two giant slides.

#4 The Blue Whale

Can you imagine anything better on a Sunday morning than to be swallowed by a blue whale? You can climb up onto the back of the whale by crawling through its mouth and into its stomach. You can also crawl through the hole in the side and into the basket, that sits on top of the whale. From here you can slide down.

#5 The Dragon

A large dragon has settled in Mulighedernes Park in Aalborg, so children come play if you dare!

#6 The Eel And The Lighthouse

Right next to the National Museum of Bermuda you will find a giant green murray eel wrapped around the a lighthouse.

#7 Futuroscope

Have you ever dreamed to be the size of the insects? The playground, Futuroscope frames that adventure with tall grass, large flowers and a giant ant.

#8 The Sperm Whale

The Sperm Whale has been the focal point of many exciting stories through times. From story about Jonas and the Whale to the stories on Moby Dick and Pinocchio.

#9 Kristineberg Slottspark

The creepy crawling is all over the large playground in Kristinebergs Slottspark. The two giant owls, both 5.5 meters tall, are the king and the queen of the playground. They are ruling over a large slide area, tempting curious boys and girls to enter both long and short slides.

#10 Children’s Railway Station

#11 The Bermuda Triangle

A pilot has been on a long expedition across the Bermuda Triangle to investigate the many stories about the ships and planes mysteriously disappearing in the area.

#12 The Rocket And The Princess Tower

The background of the founding fathers of MONSTRUM is in building set designs for theatres in Copenhagen. Just like a set design a playground must have an inspiring front attracting children and a functional backside with climbing, sliding and relaxing options.

#13 Gedden

The Pike is a very voracious fish that eats everything. In the year 1230 a German Emperor captured a pike that was over five meters long and weighed more than 1/4 ton.

#14 The Globe

On DOKK1 (Arhus new main library and citizen service center) you will find the playground ‘Kloden’ (english: the globe). The project is made in collaboration with Schmidt / Hammer / Lassen Architects and Kristine Jensen Architects. The project was donated by the Herman Salling Foundation.

#15 Terville

In Terville a large frog is looking out of the water. He tries to catch the flies with his long tongue. So beware you do not get eaten, he may well think you are a fly.

#16 The Towers

If you as a small child want to feel big go to ‘Fælledparken’ in Copenhagen and visit The Tower Playground with its countless opportunities for physical activity and technological interaction.

#17 The Submarine And The Lighthouse

The inside of the submarine is separated by a bulkhead with round manholes. The navigation deck can be accessed via the ladder in the submarine tower. Older children can climb from the navigation deck onto the hull of the submarine.

#18 Cosmos

The idea of the playground is a journey through the Russian space program. Meet the dogs Lika, Belka or Strelke and jump on to the satellite Sputnik, the launch vehicle R-7 Semyorka and moon vehicle Lunokhod 1. Climb around and explore the history and feel the rush when you crawl into the big crawling tubes or slide down the big slides. Enjoy!

#19 The Fisheries And Maritime Museum

Perhaps two ships have stranded on a small island with a lighthouse and a small lighthouse keeper’s house? Perhaps they have been lured in there by the people living on the island?

#20 The Snake In The MeldgÅrd Forest

#21 Dannebroge

A cannon is on the way out of the hull, still attached to the deck. It looks just too difficult to get on board, but soon you will see new opportunities to find small routes around the explosion.

#22 The Fortress City

The Fortress City is designed as a small adventure land where children can hide and play role games.

#23 Trinidad – The Lost Coaster

The coaster has wrecked on a sandbank and is broken in two. The many wreckage pieces, such as boxes and logs are spread out in the water and on the sandbank.

#24 Diesel Engine

You can enter the the 260cm tall Diesel engine through the flywheel, and climb on up to three tube slides.

#25 Stjernedrys

Stjerneskuddet is an integrated childcare institution for children aged one to six years in Copenhagen. The playground is divided into areas, providing space for riding a bike, playing ball, climbing and sand digging.

#26 Octopus In Gorky Park

The proud ship S/S Oceanliner is on a long journey. Suddenly, a giant octopus rises from the deep blue sea and attacks the ship.

#27 Tivoli Hotel Og Congress Center

The playground is located at the third floor level, and you can see all the way to Tivoli from the top of the Japanese tower.

#28 Santa Maria And The Easter Islands

Marco Polo’s old ship has run aground the Easter Islands, and she now lies half buried in sand far from civilisation. Two of the cannons are still intact, but the mast lies broken across the railing.

#29 The Alphabet Playground

Lots of giant letters are scattered all over the area, inspiring the children to play and have fun. The crazy, oversized letters have different sizes, colors and play opportunities.

#30 The Lighthouse And The Fishermans House

#31 Theater Playground

“Din Teaterpark” in Pildammsparken is designed by artist and scenographer Annika Carlsson together with MONSTRUM, and carried out in collaboration with Malmo Stad in 2013-2014.

#32 The Parrot

A big parrot with multiple levels inside is the new central play equipment on the playground.

#33 Tutti Frutti

You are dreaming about a big and sweet banana or pear, while you are sliding down from an apple, climbing on an orange or sailing away on a melon shell.

#34 Petzi’s World

The Danish cartoon series on Petzi tell about a life of adventure. Petzi and his friends sail their ship Mary to discover new land, solve problems for their new friends, build new things, trade, and play together.

#35 Pheasant In The Reeds

Between the long reeds stands a big beautiful pheasant. You can crawl into the body of the pheasant that serves as a playhouse in three floors. Around the pheasant is the 2-3 m tall reeds, where you can climb and balance on ropes between the tribes. Both children and adults can use the pheasant, which invites to play and stay.

#36 Seaweed

It is a hot summer day at the beach. We are in very shallow waters where the bladder seaweed sways slightly in the waves.

#37 The Large Cod

The large cod is swimming in the eelgrass with tiny fish around him. It works as a combined climbing frame and hide out.

#38 Crocodiles

The crocodiles are two sculptural elements on the beach. Here you can play – or just sit and enjoy the view.

#39 The Apple In The Grass

An apple has just fallen from the tree and is now in the grass. You can become tiny and crawl into it and explore.

#40 The Third Planet From The Sun

#41 The Submarine

The submarine has just surfaced after yet another adventure. The wave laps onto the foredeck in large soft shape, a great place to run across.

#42 The Monster In Bispeparken

The children in Bispeparken wanted a monster on the playground. MONSTRUM put up a trap and caught one.

#43 Lund

This small city is composed of a series of small playhouses, connected by a network of paths that meander through the small town.

#44 The Roly Poly

#45 Gyllins Drivhus

Playhouses in Gyllins Trädgård float on piles in different heights and provide a lovely view of the area.

#46 Small Globe

The Globe is a nice little space that you can reach by a net, a fireman’s pole or a slide.

#47 The Spider And The Wooden Huts

The spider is designed as a giant mechanical spider being caught in its own web. The head is the control cabin with two joystick controllers to handle all the legs.

#48 The Ladybird

This playground is designed like a small section of the forest floor with a ladybird, some branches, and some small rocks.

#49 Societetsparken

A large haunted house, three fluttering bats and a dark forest inhabited by ghosts set the mood of the spooky ghost playground in Varberg.

#50 The Cargo Ship

A huge cargo ship is sunk. Now it is on the ocean floor next to the lighthouse and among cargo crates and fish.9.7K shares

Andrius 

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Biggest School In Copenhagen Got Completely Covered With 12,000 Solar Panels

C.F. Møller‘s International School Nordhavn, the biggest school in Copenhagen, Denmark, has made a leap into the 21st century by transforming more than 6,000 square meters of its facade with over 12,000 solar sea-green panels. None of that sounds like a small feat, but surprisingly, making clear panels in one specific color was one of the biggest challenges that took researchers around 12 years to figure out.

They applied the process called color interfering, which is similar to what happens when you see colorful oil spots in the water. They eventually achieved it by adding fine particles to the glass surface to give the appearance of color.

Now the panels don’t just look good, they also do the job. Even though Denmark isn’t known for its sunny days, it was calculated that the new facade will cover more than half of the school’s annual energy consumption, as well as provide a pleasing new aesthetic for the Nordhavn district– a harbor currently under renovation in the Danish city.

(h/t: inhabitat)

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Andrius 

In cahoots with the secret orde…
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40 Of The Best Coronavirus Related Pieces Of Street Art

Have you learned any new talents while being stuck in quarantine? How about some languages? Don’t worry if the answer is “no” – you still have plenty of time to do that as it looks like the quarantine won’t be lifted anytime soon. But while you and I are stuck at home learning Spanish on Duolingo, some artists are still out there creating amazing street art.

Graffiti artists all over the world are creating coronavirus related street art their art pieces are as accurate as they are funny. Check them out in the gallery below!

#1 Copenhagen, Denmark. Artist: Welinoo

Image source: welinoo

#2 Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Artist: Fake

Image source: iamfake

Fake says to have painted this “Super Nurse” as an ode to all healthcare professionals around the world.

#3 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Teachr1

Image source: teachr1

#4 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#5 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

“Divided We Stand, United We Fall.”

#6 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ponywave

Image source: ponywave

From the artist’s Instagram:
“We all are going through this together. There is a reason which we will see after all. It’s time to look at ourselves. Take a look at what are we doing with the planet and our lifetime. Maybe we should change our priorities? Maybe we should slow down? Maybe we should take a look around and start respect our planet and all those with whom we share it? Maybe someone is trying to hide some changes? Or economic collapse? Maybe one more step to a new world order?”

#7 Pompei, Italy. Artist: Nello Petrucci

Image source: nellopetrucciartist

#8 Berlin, Germany. Artist: EME Freethinker

Image source: Bobone2121

#9 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Artist: Aira Ocrespo

Translation from Portuguese: “Bolsonaro’s mask against the Coronavirus.”

#10 Barcelona, Spain. Artist: Tvboy

Image source: tvboy

#11 Malmö, Sweden. Artist: Richard Juggins

Image source: Richard Juggins

#12 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Rasmus Balstrøm

Image source: balstroem

Balstrøm who is originally from Denmark did this last mural before he had to flee the country.

#13 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Corie Mattie

Image source: coriemattie

#14 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#15 Miami, USA. Artist: Sean “Hula” Yoro

Image source: the_hula

#16 London, UK. Artist: Pegaus

Image source: ojc9

#17 Jindbayne, Australia. Artist: N/A

Image source: EditedThisWay

#18 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angus

Image source: angusart85

#19 Bryne, Norway. Artist: Pøbel

Image source: pobel.no

“In these challenging times, I hope this piece can be a positive contribution and spread some joy. Be safe and take care of one another.”

#20 Mumbai, India. Artist: Tyler Street Art

Image source: tylerstreetart

“Keep calm”

#21 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#22 Melbourne, Australia. Artist: Lush Sux

Translation from Chinese – “Nothing to see, carry on.”

Image source: lushsux

#23 Tartu, Estonia. Artist: Princess Täna

Image source: princess_t2na

“Living in a bubble. Just to be more ironic, a soap bubble.”

#24 Warsaw, Poland

Image source: cdn.natemat.pl

Translates to: Not every hero wears a cape. Thank you! (Translation credit: Draco Malfoy)

#25 Glasgow, UK. Artist: The Rebel Bear

Image source: the.rebel.bear

#26 New York, USA. Artist: Crkshnk

Image source: crkshnk

#27 United Kingdom. Artist: Gnasher

Image source: gnashermurals

#28 Bristol, UK. Artist: John D’oh

Image source: johndohart

#29 New York, USA. Artist: Jason Naylor

Image source: jasonnaylor

#30 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: Jilly Ballistic

#31 London, UK. Artist: N/A

Image source: Hookedblog

#32 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jeremy Novy

Image source: jeremynovy

#33 Dublin, Ireland. Artist: Subset Collective

Image source: subset

#34 New York, USA. Artist: Jilly Ballistic

Image source: jillyballistic

#35 Copenhagen. Denmark. Artist: Andreas Welin

Image source: Welinoo

“a-a-Achoooo!”

#36 Bristol, UK. Artist: Angusart85

Image source: angusart85

#37 London, UK. Artist: Lionel Stanhope

Image source: lionel_stanhope

#38Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Jules Muck

Image source: muckrock

#39 Los Angeles, USA. Artist: Ruben Rojas

Image source: rubenrojas

#40 Bristol, UK. Artist: Diff

Image source: diff_artist

Aušrys Uptas

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

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30 Country Flags Reimagined As Anime Characters For 2020 Tokyo Olympics

By now, you’ve probably already heard that Tokyo will be hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics. To celebrate this upcoming event, a handful of Japanese artists decided to team up and reimagine some of the participating countries as badass warriors.

The artists took inspiration from each countries’ flags and history while giving all of them a unique twist. From Japan itself to South Africa, check out the countries reimagined as anime warriors in the gallery below!

More info: world-flags.org | Twitter

#1 Philippines

Image source: world flags

#2 Mexico

Image source: world flags

#3 UK

Image source: world flags

#4 Vietnam

Image source: world flags

#5 South Korea

Image source: world flags

#6 Japan

Image source: world flags

#7 China

Image source: world flags

#8 South Africa

Image source: world flags

#9 Sweden

Image source: world flags

#10 Malaysia

Image source: world flags

#11 Italy

Image source: world flags

#12 Finland

Image source: world flags

#13 Canada

Image source: world flags

#14 Belgium

Image source: world flags

#15 Spain

Image source: world flags

#16 France

Image source: world flags

#17 Switzerland

Image source: world flags

#18 Germany

Image source: world flags

#19 Argentina

Image source: world flags

#20 Norway

Image source: world flags

#21 Singapore

Image source: world flags

#22 Thailand

Image source: world flags

#23 Brazil

Image source: world flags

#24 India

Image source: world flags

#25 Indonesia

Image source: world flags

#26 Netherlands

Image source: world flags

#27 Venesuela

Image source: world flags

#28 Denmark

Image source: world flags

#29 Russia

Image source: world flags

#30 USA

Image source: world flags

Continue reading 30 Country Flags Reimagined As Anime Characters For 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Adorable Duo Travels The World To Play With Architecture

Spain-based duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devis love traveling and searching for interesting geometry in architecture. They photograph their adorable explorations and everything looks like straight out of an aesthetic fairytale.

Each photo also has an entertaining element of quirkiness. Daniel and Anna always find the funniest ways to ‘interact’ with the architecture in their shots, and it adds an additional amusing dimension to the already rich and fascinating images.

More info: Daniel’s Instagram | Anna’s Instagram

Copenhagen, Denmark

Valencia, Spain

Muralla Roja, Spain

Valencia, Spain

Copenhagen, Denmark

Valencia, Spain

Munich, Germany

Valencia, Spain

Riccione, Italy

Valencia, Spain

Strasbourg, France

Copenhagen, Denmark

Muralla Roja, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Valencia, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Munich, Germany

Valencia, Spain

Lisbon, Portugal

Munich, Germany

Dublin, Ireland

Continue reading Adorable Duo Travels The World To Play With Architecture

These Circle Gardens In Denmark Look Almost Too Perfect To Be Real

There’s no better feeling than escaping to nature after a hard week of working. And what better place to escape to than your own personal tiny garden home. The Brøndby Haveby or Brøndby Garden City is a small community located just a short drive from Copenhagen, Denmark. What sets it apart from any other garden community out there is its unique shape. The houses are arranged in a circular pattern and look absolutely surreal when viewed from above.

More info: Instagram

Image credits: henry_do

Photographer Henry Do has recently captured these amazing drone photos of the community and the look absolutely stunning.

Image credits: henry_do

The Brøndby Haveby houses are the perfect place to run away from the bustling city – the large yards mean plenty of room for activities and the tall hedges ensure your privacy.

Image credits: Google Earth

The municipality of Brøndby approved the idea of this “garden city” over 50 years ago, back in 1964, and the circles began popping up one by one.

Image credits: Google Earth

This specific arrangement wasn’t chosen by accident. The architect that designed the “garden city” said that the idea behind the circles was to increase social interaction among the renters.

Image credits: Google Earth

When viewed from above, the circle gardens look even more surreal. They kind of look like grapes on a vine, don’t they?

Image credits: Google Earth

Here’s what people had to say about the Brøndby Haveby








Continue reading These Circle Gardens In Denmark Look Almost Too Perfect To Be Real

10 Modern-Rustic Weekend Houses in the Country

Hot summers in the city get old pretty fast, so having a weekend house in the country is a luxury. But that doesn’t mean that luxury can’t be rustic. Here are 10 residences that are stunning in their get-away-from-it-all simplicity.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20

1. Hilltop Aerie by Aidlin Darling Design Provides Respite in Northern California

Two San Francisco denizens working in finance and tech came to Aidlin Darling Design with a straightforward proposition. Create a simple, efficient house, restrained in cost and scale, for their empty hillside site in Glen Ellen, about an hour north of the city. The couple’s only imperative? A single-story plan. Since Barry Mehew and David Rice were familiar with tending to aging relatives, they knew to avoid the hazards staircases present (their main residence, a four-story Victorian in the city, has plenty). Although they envisioned this new house as a weekend getaway for now, they anticipate eventually spending most of their time there, and downsizing to a pied-à-terre back in the city. Read more about this project

2. Jan Henrik Jensen Designs Unconventional Round House in Denmark

In the Danish shelter magazine that Finn and Janni Holm subscribe to, architect Jan Henrik Jansenwas pictured sitting in front of a house that he had constructed with his own hands. “We just rang him and asked him to do one for us,” Janni Holm says. “That’s where our adventure started.” The Holms had decided to build a new home on a lot and a simple wooden farmhouse was what they had in mind. What they got was entirely different, thanks to Jansen’s standard procedure: always conceiving more than one solution for a project. He first showed the Holms a design that corresponded exactly to their farmhouse brief. Then he surprised them with plans for a radically different idea: a round house. Read more about this project

3. SPG Architects Transforms Lilian Swann Saarinen’s Former Cape Cod Residence

Modernist royalty, by marriage, Lilian Swann Saarinen had met her husband, Eero, when she was studying sculpture at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, headed by his father, Eliel. After the younger Saarinens’ divorce in 1953, she moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, with their two children and asked former Eero Saarinen and Associates architect Olav Hammarstrom to expand a fisherman’s cottage in the Cape Cod town of Wellfleet for use as a low-budget family getaway. “On the Cape, a lot of architects built on a dime and a prayer,” SPG Architects principal Eric Gartner explains. Considerably more painstaking was his own task: updating the Hammarstrom design for repeat clients, one in financial services and the other a sculptor. Read more about this project

4. The Success of Andreas Martin Löf’s House Near Stockholm Lies in Being Playful and Taking Risks

“Everybody was against it,” Andreas Martin-Löf says, looking at the offending infinity pool outside his weekend house in the Stockholm archipelago. “My friends thought it was nouveau riche. They wondered why I couldn’t just go down to the jetty for a swim, like everyone else.” Traditionally, Swedes favor rustic summer retreats, and Martin-Löf concedes that he usually dislikes “luxury” architecture both personally and in his work at Andreas Martin-Löf Architects. Yet he was intrigued by the possibility of the infinity pool as a mirror for the property’s pine trees and expansive water views. “The pool is a crucial part of the success of the house,” he continues. “You have to be a bit playful and take a few risks.” Read more about this project

Read more: 15 Incredible Pools from Around the World

5. Michigan Lake House by Desai Chia Architecture: 2016 Best of Year Winner for Country House

A real-estate entrepreneur clipped and saved a newspaper story about Arjun Desai and Katherine Chia’s glassy weekend pavilion that won a Best of Year Award in 2013. The entrepreneur was intrigued by the way the house practically floated above its spectacular surroundings, a bucolic estate in rural New York—because he had just bought 60 acres on a remote peninsula jutting into Lake Michigan. Arguably even more extraordinary than the New York site, this one sits between a cherry orchard and a bluff plunging 120 feet down to the water. Read more about this project

6. Minimalist Gem by Atelier Carvalho Arujo Masters a Tricky Site in Portugal 

Modernist-minded designers often mine bodies of water for inspiration. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater—perhaps the greatest house of the 20th century—wouldn’t exist without the stream that runs, dramatically, below it. Following in this storied tradition, Atelier Carvalho Araújo used water as both guide and counterpoint in designing a house in Vieira do Minho, Portugal. The site is a steep slope overlooking the Caniçada Valley, about 20 miles northeast of Braga. A stream meanders down the site, connecting ponds at the top and bottom of the hillside, both now corralled into freeform pools.“Architecture must have the gift of awakening sensations, emotions,” principal José Manuel Carvalho Araújo says. “The only thing I don’t want to evoke is indifference.” Read more about this project

7. Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks Conceive Stone-Clad House Near the Estate of Her Father, Charles

When it comes to delivering the unexpected, Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks, respectively 33 and 35 years old, have already developed a reputation. The pair transformed a tiny tile showroom in London with an installation of porcelain planks, playing cleverly with geometry in just four shades of gray to achieve a dazzling op art effect—a tour de force that landed right on the cover of Interior Design. Now, with a weekend house in Scotland, Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio have defied expectation in very different ways. Read more about this project

8. Nani Marquina’s Costa Brava Retreat Is a Collector’s Paradise

Nani Marquina has a thing for straw hand brooms. The textile designer and Nanimarquinafounder owns more than two-dozen such specimens, sourced from locales as far flung as Thailand, Pakistan, and Ibiza. Her collecting passion also extends to woven baskets, beaded necklaces, teapots, seeds, dried gourds, soap, succulents, and sand (stored in fish bowls), all of which garnish the Esclanyà, Spain, getaway she shares with her husband, photographer Albert Font. The 1970s dwelling has a whitewashed simplicity that renders it a perfect backdrop for the couple’s assorted ephemera. “The most important thing is not the container, but the contents,” Marquina says. Read more about his project

9. Architect Mathias Klotz Creates a Pair of Cottages on a Remote Island in Chile

For Chileans—especially those who live in the frenetic capital, Santiago—a second home is an essential refuge, an escape to the serene beauty of the natural landscape. Architect Mathias Klotz, principal of his eponymous firm, has designed many such houses, characteristically with a clean-lined modernism that nods to one of his heroes, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. For his own family’s retreat on a largely undeveloped coastal island, he used archetypal forms that evoke both past and present. Constrained by the remote location and tricky logistics, the result is a timeless design that blends into the pristine setting. Read more about this project

10. Mork Ulnes Architects and Office of Charles de Lisle Create a Minimalist Guesthouse in Sonoma

Casper Mork-Ulnes was born in Norway, moved to Italy at age 2, and came to San Francisco at 16. He also lived in Scotland and studied architecture at California College of the Arts and Columbia University before establishing Mork Ulnes Architects back in San Francisco. That’s an unusually lengthy introduction, granted, to an unusual small project in the Sonoma Valley town of Glen Ellen. Mork-Ulnes had remodeled the property’s original house for its previous owners. The new ones, a family of five, brought him back for a guesthouse. At 840 square feet, it comprises three volumes, each of which contains a bedroom and a bathroom. They’re arranged in a stepped configuration, sharing party walls and a canted roof but no internal corridor. Read more about this project

Read more: 10 Bright and Modern Beach Houses

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16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

Popularity for Danish furniture continues to surge. A great place to experience this in action: 3DaysofDesign, which was held May 23-25 in Copenhagen. With product and brand launches, exhibitions and pop-up events, and a record 150 exhibitors, the sixth edition of Denmark’s annual design event was bigger and bolder this year, with increased citywide presence in part due to a graphic identity crafted by Spanish artist and designer Jaime Hayon. From Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings now available to all, archival pieces finding a new audience, and a reinvention of the lowly toilet brush, here are 16 of our favorite finds.

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

 

Take home your very own Michelin-starred restaurant furnishings with the Holmen collection from Space Copenhagen. Noma, the Copenhagen restaurant lauded as one of the best in the world, auctioned off its oak side tables by cabinet maker Malte Gormsen for a cool $4,000 a piece—while the MG 205 side table by Malte Gormsen was offered at a more reasonable price point. 

Photography by Magnus Omme, courtesy of Space Copenhagen.

The browned oak and metal MG 101 dining chair, also part of the Holmen collection by Malte Gormsen for Space Copenhagen, once furnished the 108 restaurant in Copenhagen, a Noma-spin off.

Photography courtesy of Carl Hansen & Søn.

An archival piece with a distinctive pressed veneer backrest saw daylight once more with Carl Hansen & Søn ‘s re-release of the Contour lounge chair, designed by Børge Mogensen in 1949. Available in oak, walnut, or a combination of the two, the chair stays true to original sketches— with the exception of added comfort in the form of an upholstered seat.

Photography courtesy of File Under Pop.

File Under Pop presented a new brand focusing on surfaces, first previewed in Milan last month. A collaboration between File Under Pop founder and creative director Josephine Akvama Hoffmeyer and architect Elisa Ossino, H+O is a modular tile brand applicable for use on walls, floors, and ceilings. The large-format Rilievi collection consists of eight different tiles with three-dimensional geometric surfaces available in four color ways.

Photography courtesy of &Tradition.

The distinctive shape of a fungus brings the USB-chargeable Setago table lamp for &Tradition to life. Just like a mushroom, the wireless lamp, designed by Jaime Hayon and first presented in Milan this year, can be plucked and moved at ease.

Photography courtesy of Takt.

The stackable oak and plywood Cross chair by London studio PearsonLloyd for the freshly launched design brand Takt can be shipped flatpack—one of the factors leading to its sustainable certification. It’s also made of 100 percent FSC-certified wood.

Photography courtesy of Wehlers.

Fishing nets and steel are recycled and repurposed for the fabrication of the R.U.M. chair—short for ReUsedMaterials—designed by C. F. Møller Design for Wehlers.

Photography courtesy of Please Wait to be Seated.

Bulk just where you want it—at the seat pad—is behind the name of the tubular steel Tubby Tube, a stool by Faye Toogood for Please Wait to be Seated.

Photography courtesy of Jot.jot.

The comfort of wood and the strength of steel are a successful union for the slim yet sturdy and stackable Shadow chair by Boris Berlin Design for Jot.jot.

Photography courtesy of Skagerak.

Bold color marks the 20th anniversary of the Cutter Jubilee bench by Niels Hvass for Skagerak , now available in scarlet red-lacquered oak.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

The armchair, later nicknamed the Grasshopper due to its nod to the herbivorous insect, was first designed by Finn Juhl in 1938. However, it wasn’t until much later that the chair’s avant-garde form received appreciation. Before its release at Milan Design Week under House of Finn Juhl, the firm that carries on the designer’s legacy, only two existed—and one auctioned off for $360,000 in 2018.

Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.

House of Finn Juhl also presented Finn Juhl’s extendable Bovirke table, which premiered at an exhibition in 1948. Available in oak or walnut, Bovirke nearly doubles in size, from 55 inches to 94 inches long.

The Bovirke table by Finn Juhl, an archival piece released by House of Finn Juhl. Photography courtesy of House of Finn Juhl.
Photography courtesy of Fredericia.

In tribute to the former home of Copenhagen’s Royal Mail—now the manufacturer’s showroom—Fredericia presented the Post collection by Cecilie Manz. A plywood seat and back combines with a solid wood frame for the Post chair. First previewed in Milan last month, the collection also includes a table.

Photography courtesy of Unidrain.

A 3 Days of Design breakfast event celebrated the lowly toilet brush with a presentation from Unidrain. With an inner container fitted with a splash guard and a replaceable brush head resisting both water and paper collection, Toilet Brush Wall Mounted Copper is engineered to reduce bacteria and mess.

Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.

 The distinctive shape of a technical drawing tool—the compass—inspired the back of the Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman, while cushions take cues from the round sphere it draws.

The Circle dining chair by Overgaard & Dyrman. Photography courtesy of Overgaard & Dyrman.
Photography courtesy of Montana.

Montana introduced a new color palette for its signature shelving—an endeavor the manufacturer undertakes every eight years. Developed in collaboration with Danish designer Margrethe Odgaard, the 30 new hues include amber, rhubarb, flint, and chamomile, shown (clockwise) here.

Continue reading 16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3 Days of Design

Smart Design Informs Copenhagen’s Skovbakke School (& Hygee, Too)

ODDER, Denmark — If there is such a place as Heaven, it was likely designed by the Danes. For some that might be blasphemous, but for those who are fans of contemporary, clean design, nobody does it better than the Danish.

Continue reading Smart Design Informs Copenhagen’s Skovbakke School (& Hygee, Too)

Why You Should Visit the 3 Happiest Countries in the World

A new study by the U.N. recognized these three neighboring countries as the happiest in the world, so we’ve provided a guide for when you travel there.

Continue reading Why You Should Visit the 3 Happiest Countries in the World

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