Tag Archives: Concrete

Amazing Concrete Micro-Homes by Fala Atelier

The architecture studio Fala Atelier has built six micro apartments around a communal garden in Porto, Portugal.
The Portuguese studio renovated a pair of granite buildings to create a row of five 30-square-metre houses next to a slightly larger single-family home, all of which share similar interior design, materials and finishes.closevolume_off

Each house has a living space on the ground floor lit by a pair of shuttered windows, one of which acts as a door, with a staircase leading to a sleeping area that is placed above a bathroom.

“This project explains our architectural ambition: we want to create independently of the limits imposed by the original building and the starting conditions” explains the studio.

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Content CuratorARCHITECTURE

July 17, 2020 0 6

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NYCxDESIGN Awards Celebrate the City’s Best Products and Projects for Fourth Year

On Monday, May 20th, more than 700 guests gathered at Pier 17 in Lower Manhattan to once again celebrate the winners of the fourth annual NYCxDESIGN Awards, presented by Interior Design and ICFF. By now, NYCxDESIGN needs no introduction—the overwhelmingly popular design festival attracted more than 347,000 attendees and sponsored over 400 events in all five boroughs in 2018. The NYCxDESIGN Awards extol the best projects and products that were either created or shown in New York City this year.

> Watch highlights from the event

The award for honorees. Photography by Christopher P Ernst.

After a few brief introductory comments by the NYCEDC’s CMO Edward Hogikyan and ICFF director Kevin O’Keefe, Interior Design Editor in Chief Cindy Allen resumed her duties as M.C. of the event. This year she had over 200 finalists in the products category to announce, as well as  over 100 projects. Winners of each respective category were awarded with the highly-coveted Lladró Guest figurine. 

NYCXDESIGN attendees toast to another inspiring awards ceremony. Photography by Matthew Carasella.

 

The awards ceremony started with product winners, which included the Vettis™ concrete bath fitting collection from Brizo, Astek’s ceramics-inspired Re-Glazed wallcovering collection with interior designer Jeff Andrews, and Buoyant NYC’s quartz and onyx stone DELLA Sconce. Project winners included the Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group behemoth, The Shed; Chelsea’s newest speakeasy, The 18th Room, by West Chin Architects; and the Glossier NYC Flagship store by Gachot Studios. 

Editor in Chief Cindy Allen announcing winners to a packed house. Photography by Matthew Carasella.

View the slideshow to see highlights from the event >>

View the full list of winners and honorees >>

A big thank you to all of our NYCXDESIGN Award partners:

Continue reading NYCxDESIGN Awards Celebrate the City’s Best Products and Projects for Fourth Year

2019’s Top Kitchen Flooring Trends and How to Style Them in Your Home

Outside Is the New Inside, and 7 More of the Year’s Biggest Outdoor Design Trends

| May 9, 2018
 

The days are getting deliciously longer, temperatures are climbing, and the backyard barbecue invites are just pouring in. The seasons, they are a-changin’—and as we swing into summer, there’s no better time to give your outdoor space a boost.

“This year it’s really about making your outdoor space function like an interior space for all things fun, lounging, and entertaining,” says San Diego interior designer Gretchen Kennelly.

Read on for designers’ top tips to harness the year’s hottest design trends and really maximize your pad’s outdoor potential.

1. Outdoor ‘rooms’


Photo by Shuler Architecture 
Now more than ever, designers say, homeowners want their indoor spaces to blend seamlessly with the great outdoors.

Your main goal is to find ways to bring the inside out: Frame sitting areas with water- and mildew-resistant curtains. Anchor furniture with outdoor rugs. And fill tall planters with low-maintenance ornamental grasses to create the illusion of walled space.

If you have a covered deck or patio, consider covering the ceiling in raw, untreated wood planks to warm things up. And mount wall sconces to add mood lighting for those late-evening glasses of rosé.

Kennelly also likes to place large daybed pieces in an outdoor space and position cabanas over them for shade.

“This creates a great place to retreat and lounge with a glass of wine at the end of a long day,” she says.

And if space (or your budget) is tight, try this trick from designer Christina Harmon: Grab a rope hammock on Amazon, decorate it with outdoor pillows and a pretty throw, and “voilà—it’s an automatic pop-up outdoor area for under $300,” she says.

2. Innovative new fabrics


Photo by Sofas by Design
For years, Sunbrella’s been the Old Faithful of outdoor fabrics; you can do pretty much anything to it and it bounces right back.

But there are a lot of other great options out there, Harmon points out. She likes polyester terrycloth, which “looks like a towel, but is totally made to be used outdoors.”

Other great alternatives we love include indoor-outdoor wovens from California designer Peter Dunham and performance velvet (yep, you read that correctly) from Chicago-based Holly Hunt.

We’ve “reached a new level this season with outdoor furniture that looks and feels just like indoor furniture,” says Deborah Holt, a marketing manager with Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture in Dallas.

Don’t want to spring for new furniture? Check out Neverwet, which comes in a spray can and creates a moisture-repelling barrier on a variety of surfaces, including canvas.

“This product is incredible at water-coating virtually any fabric,” Harmon says.

3. True-blue (and green) hues


Photo by Johnson Design Inc.
Deep blues and greens are the name of the game this season. From cushions to umbrellas to tiles and everything in between, expect to see lots of lush, rich Côte d’Azur-inspired hues.

“This year, it’s all about outdoor spaces that feel luxurious rather than cheesy,” Harmon says. “Think lots of neutrals coupled with gorgeous, jewel-toned greens and furniture and accessories that create a truly indoor-outdoor vibe.”

4. Concrete


Photo by David Hertz & Studio of Environmental Architecture
Concrete is having a major design moment—it’s cheap, durable, and easy to stain or stamp with funky colors or patterns. This year, designers predict the cool composite will be everywhere inside and out—from benches and tables to planters and fire pits.

“The cool factor of concrete works well in many settings, regardless of the age or aesthetic of the home,” says South Carolina designer Leigh Meadows-McAlpin, who’s particularly fond of the concrete pieces in Mr. Brown Home’s outdoor collection.

5. Alternative flooring options


Photo by Finch London 
Outdoor rugs have been a mainstay of exterior design for years, but a new crop of budget-conscious flooring alternatives has emerged to shake things up this season.

For example, porcelain is becoming a new favorite because it’s durable, simple to install, and mirrors indoor trends—making it easy to provide visual continuity between inside and outside.

Porcelain pavers can create this beautiful transition without creating a huge divide between the two living spaces,” says Joe Raboine, national design and training specialist with Belgard.

Harmon also loves Ikea’s beechwood deck tiles, which she’s used in her own backyard to dress up her space on the cheap.

“These tiles are workhorses,” she says. “They take 10 minutes max to install, are well-priced, and are of great quality. They’re a really inexpensive way to freshen up your patio or balcony without spending a lot of money.”

6. Vertical gardens


Photo by Carolina Katz + Paula Nuñez
“With outdoor space under an all-time demand, homeowners are getting creative to use the space they have,” Raboine says.

Enter: Vertical gardening, which maximizes available space and affords even small-space dwellers the ability to grow their own herbs and veggies at home.

Add elegance by installing vertical structures such as arbors, arches, pergolas, and gazebos. They’ll “help create the ambience of an outdoor garden ‘room’ and give a sense of height and depth to an otherwise small space,” Raboine says.

7. Bold lighting concepts


Photo by Mondo Exclusive HomesLook for patio pictures
Have a flair for the dramatic? Extend it to your outdoor lighting to kick up your space’s cool factor.

“This year is the time to brighten up the exterior of your home in unexpected ways,” says Michael Amato, creative director at the Urban Electric Co.

“If you have an all-white painted brick or stucco home, adding lighting in a fun color like blue with gold hardware creates interest,” he suggests. “If your house is already painted a fun color, lighting presents a great opportunity to work in a contrasting color for a striking statement.”

8. ‘Sling’ furniture


Photo by Pioneer Family Pools
The watchword this season for outdoor duds? “Sling.”

Even if you’ve never heard the term, you’ve most definitely seen sling furniture. This stuff is made of durable, woven materials and doesn’t require frills such as upholstery and cushions—which can be challenging to clean and store away in the winter. It’s sleek, streamlined, and easy to maintain.

Sling furniture is “strong, comfortable, and wears well in the sun,” says Tina Anastasia, a partner at Mark P. Finlay Interiors.

Bonus: “It’s come a long way with the technology in the weaving,” she says. “It can be bleach-cleaned, is easy to rinse off, and it dries much quicker than cushions.”

 
Based in San Diego, Holly Amaya is a writer, lawyer, and communications strategist. She writes about real estate, legal, lifestyle, motherhood, and career issues.

Continue reading Outside Is the New Inside, and 7 More of the Year’s Biggest Outdoor Design Trends

Why This Bold Architect Loves Building Skyscrapers Made of Wood

Vancouver-based architect Michael Green speaks with AD about the role of wood in architecture and why the U.S. is poised for a big movement in sustainable building.

Continue reading Why This Bold Architect Loves Building Skyscrapers Made of Wood

Cement — technically, concrete — is the next cool touch in interior design

  • By Todd von Kampen// World-Herald correspondent
  • 0
Cement — technically, concrete — the next cool touch in interior design
A student-staffed design lab led by Min | Day used design features and materials to complement concrete in the reception area of the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts.

MICHAEL SINCLAIR

 

Even as office-design experts tout a “green” resurgence in today’s workspaces — in plant life and environmental sustainability — the next trend already is on its way.

Green and living, it is not.

In writing last August about the “Hottest Office Design Trends of 2018,” an Ambius.com blogger took note of a “Cement Everything” trend gaining steam since 2016, even as plant- and sunlight-friendly “biophilic design” reigns supreme.

 

“No longer relegated to the outdoors, you’ll find cement in homes, restaurants, offices and just about anywhere and everywhere these days,” wrote Zack Sterkenberg. “Traditionally non-cement features such as floors, countertops, plant containers, sinks and shelving are now being built and intricately designed using cement and inlaid with wood, stonework or even paint.”

In singing the praises of cement, the major ingredient in concrete, Sterkenberg called attention to its “simple, minimalist aesthetic, clean and smooth lines, well-documented toughness and surprising versatility.”

To be scientifically accurate, this “cement” aesthetic ought to be called “concrete,” said Dana Vaux, director of the interior design program at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

No matter the name, she added, the trend is reminiscent of Bauhaus design, which emerged after World War I, and the more current mid-century modern movement.

Pairing concrete walls and floors with green plants and neutral colors to break up the light color of the concrete promotes what Sterkenberg called “a stunning juxtaposition that stands out as modern and industrial.”

Reliance on concrete has two important drawbacks in light of the push for more comfortable and healthful workplaces, noted Vaux and Nanci Stephenson, interior design program coordinator at Metropolitan Community College in Omaha.

“A concrete floor is very durable and long-lasting,” Vaux said.

But given the present-day emergence of stand-or-sit workstations, “if you’re standing for long periods of time, it’s a problem.”

If offices have concrete walls and floors, “the acoustics really suffer,” Stephenson added.

 
 

The Building Materials Of The Future Are….Old Buildings!

Continue reading The Building Materials Of The Future Are….Old Buildings!

Cement — technically, concrete — is the next cool touch in interior design

  • By Todd von Kampen/World-Herald Correspondent
  • Updated
 
Cement — technically, concrete — the next cool touch in interior design
A student-staffed design lab led by Min | Day used design features and materials to complement concrete in the reception area of the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts.

MICHAEL SINCLAIR

 Even as office-design experts tout a “green” resurgence in today’s workspaces — in plant life and environmental sustainability — the next trend already is on its way.

Green and living, it is not.

In writing last August about the “Hottest Office Design Trends of 2018,” an Ambius.com blogger took note of a “Cement Everything” trend gaining steam since 2016, even as plant- and sunlight-friendly “biophilic design” reigns supreme.

 

“No longer relegated to the outdoors, you’ll find cement in homes, restaurants, offices and just about anywhere and everywhere these days,” wrote Zack Sterkenberg. “Traditionally non-cement features such as floors, countertops, plant containers, sinks and shelving are now being built and intricately designed using cement and inlaid with wood, stonework or even paint.”

In singing the praises of cement, the major ingredient in concrete, Sterkenberg called attention to its “simple, minimalist aesthetic, clean and smooth lines, well-documented toughness and surprising versatility.”

To be scientifically accurate, this “cement” aesthetic ought to be called “concrete,” said Dana Vaux, director of the interior design program at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

No matter the name, she added, the trend is reminiscent of Bauhaus design, which emerged after World War I, and the more current mid-century modern movement.

Pairing concrete walls and floors with green plants and neutral colors to break up the light color of the concrete promotes what Sterkenberg called “a stunning juxtaposition that stands out as modern and industrial.”

 

Reliance on concrete has two important drawbacks in light of the push for more comfortable and healthful workplaces, noted Vaux and Nanci Stephenson, interior design program coordinator at Metropolitan Community College in Omaha.

“A concrete floor is very durable and long-lasting,” Vaux said.

But given the present-day emergence of stand-or-sit workstations, “if you’re standing for long periods of time, it’s a problem.”

If offices have concrete walls and floors, “the acoustics really suffer,” Stephenson added.

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