Tag Archives: Christopher Columbus

People Share 29 Statues That Are Better Than The Ones Torn Down By The Protesters

If you’re following the news, you probably heard that protestors took down the statue of Edward Colston, an English merchant who was known for being involved in slave trade, in Bristol. Well, the takedown of this statue actually inspired other protesters to tear down numerous other statues who depicted slave owners and other human rights abusers, like Christopher Columbus and Robert Milligan. However, this doesn’t mean that all monuments are dedicated to terrible people. People on Twitter are sharing photos of monuments dedicated to activists and revolutionaries who fought for peace and equality, and all of us should learn more about them.

Continue reading People Share 29 Statues That Are Better Than The Ones Torn Down By The Protesters

People Share 29 Statues That Are Better Than The Ones Torn Down By The Protesters

If you’re following the news, you probably heard that protestors took down the statue of Edward Colston, an English merchant who was known for being involved in slave trade, in Bristol. Well, the takedown of this statue actually inspired other protesters to tear down numerous other statues who depicted slave owners and other human rights abusers, like Christopher Columbus and Robert Milligan. However, this doesn’t mean that all monuments are dedicated to terrible people. People on Twitter are sharing photos of monuments dedicated to activists and revolutionaries who fought for peace and equality, and all of us should learn more about them.

Check out the monuments dedicated to heroes all around the world in the gallery below!

#1

Image source: JustSabina_

#2

Image source: fastcarspete

#3

Image source: SilkCutBlue

#4

Image source: fleshflesh808

#5

Image source: _James_Holt_

#6

Image source: corinapickering

#7

Image source: _Cailin_Corcra_

#8

Image source: cnombret

#9

Image source: Sarakimbap

#10

Image source: Pip_est89

#11

Image source: InFluxSince83

#12

Image source: HerefortheMerl2

#13

Image source: revkatebottley

#14

Image source: JudithFreedman

#15

Image source: LaurenceL_Art

#16

Image source: firendeslre

#17

Image source: moongiggles

#18

Image source: onthemoon69

#19

Image source: SammSpamm1

#20

Image source: krayziedoc

#21

Image source: Tweettweetter

#22

Image source: JaneyGodley

#23

Image source: SterHardaway

#24

Image source: CuteGal432121

#25

Image source: Sphiwe52346137

#26

Image source: ARCASH

#27

Image source: TinkerbellTinny

#28

Image source: UgonnaOkoro

#29

Image source: rattlecans776 shares

Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

Got wisdom to pour?

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!

29 Statues Taken Down For Glorifying What’s Wrong With Out Society

The recent ruthless killing of George Floyd and the protests that followed have prompted many people to reevaluate many statues and monuments dedicated to the so-called ‘heroes’ whose human rights violations often go undermined. Tired of this glorification of oppressors, protesters and city governments all over the world have started taking down monuments dedicated to historical figures like Christopher Columbus and Edward Colston. However, this isn’t the first time these types of sculptures are taken down – read about some of the most notable ones that were taken down for glorifying what’s wrong with our society in the gallery below!

#1

Image source: Walt Disney World

Bust of Bill Cosby (American comedian) in Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, taken down in July, 2015 due to accusations of sexual assault.

#2

Image source:  Man vyi

Commemorative brick dedicated to Gary Glitter (English glam rock singer) removed from the Wall of Fame at the Cavern Club in Liverpool. It was taken down in November, 2008 due to Glitter’s possession of child pornography, child sexual abuse, and attempted rape of minors.

#3

Image source: Audrey

Statue of Joe Paterno (American football player) in Penn State’s Beaver Stadium, Pennsylvania, taken down on July 22, 2012 due to his child sex abuse scandals.

#4

Image source:  Michael Rivera

A Confederate memorial in Jacksonville, Florida, taken down on June 9, 2020 as part of the mayor’s plan to remove all confederate monuments, memorials, and markers during the George Floyd protests.

#5

Image source: Simon Cobb

Statue of Edward Colston (English merchant) in Bristol, UK, taken down on 7 June, 2020 for his involvement in slave trade.

#6

Image source: Corgan

“One Riot, One Ranger” statue In Dallas, Texas, removed on June 4, 2020 for its reference to a riot by a white lynch mob and for the statue’s model being used in helping prevent black students from enrolling in public schools.

#7

Image source: John Scholte

Statue of Leopold II Of Belgium (King of the Belgians) in Ekeren, Belgium, taken down in June, 2020 for colonialist exploitation and other atrocities.

#8

Image source:  Smash the Iron Cage

Statue of Christopher Columbus (Italian navigator and admiral) in Richmond, Virginia, taken down, spray-painted, set on fire, and thrown into a nearby lake by protestors on June 9, 2020 in solidarity with Native Americans.

#9

Image source: Jim Kenney

Statue of Frank Rizzo (American police officer and politician) in Center City Philadelphia, taken down on June 2, 2020 for his strong opposition against desegregation.

#10

Image source: Unknown U.S. military or Department of Defense employee

Statue of Saddam Hussein (President of Iraq) in Baghdad, Iraq, taken down on April 9, 2003 during the invasion of Iraq by the US forces.

#11

Image source: Kaya

Statue of J.F.C. Hamilton (British Naval Officer and namesake of Hamilton City) in Hamilton, New Zealand, taken down on June 12, 2020 by the request of the Maori Tribal Confederation Waikato Tainui.

#12

Image source:  Paulscrawl

Monument to Robert E. Lee (Confederate General) in New Orleans, Louisiana, taken down on May 19, 2017 as part of a removal of four monuments associated with the Confederacy.

#13

Image source: Kenneth C. Zirkel

Statue of Edward Ward Carmack (newspaperman and political figure) in Tennessee Capitol, taken down in June, 2020 for his views against African Americans and encouraged retaliation against the support of the Civil Rights Movement.

#14

Image source: Danie van der Merwe 

Statue of Cecil John Rhodes (British mining magnate and politician) in Cape Town, South Africa, taken down on 9 April, 2015 as part of a protest to decolonialize education in South Africa.

#15

Image source: Anne B. Hood

Statue of Orville L. Hubbard (Mayor of Dearborn) in Dearborn, Michigan, taken down on September 29, 2015 due to his strong views and policies supporting racial segregation.

#16

Image source: Peter Trimming / Statue of Robert Milligan / CC BY-SA 2.0

Statue of Robert Milligan (Scottish merchant) in the Museum of London Docklands, taken down on June 9, 2020 for him being a slave owner.

#17

Image source: Mike Peel

Dunham Massey Hall Sundial, taken down in June, 2020 as a degrading depiction of slavery during the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests.

#18

Image source: USA Today

Statue of Jerry Richardson (Former NFL Owner) in Charlotte, North Carolina, taken down to prevent possible vandalism due to allegations of sexual harassment and racist remarks to his former employees.

#19

Image source:  Infrogmation of New Orleans

Bust of John Mcdonogh in New Orleans, Louisiana, taken down on June 13, 2020 for being a slave owner.

#20

Image source: Daderot

Statue of Jefferson Davis in Frankfort, Kentucky, moved on June 13, 2020 by a vote of the Historic Properties Advisory Commission to the Jefferson Davis State Historic Site due to him being a slave owner.

#21

Image source:  Peetlesnumber1

Statue of Kate Smith (American singer) at the Xfinity Live! Philadelphia Arena, taken down on April 21, 2019 due to controversy surrounding her 1931 recordings of “That’s Why Darkies Were Born” and “Pickaninny Heaven”.

#22

Image source:  Patche99z

Statue of Michael Jackson (American singer) in London, though officially not stated, it is speculated that it was removed in September, 2013 due to sexual allegations against Jackson.

#23

Image source: Richmond On The James

Statue of Williams Carter Wickham in Richmond, Virginia, taken down on June 6, 2020 due to him being a slave owner.

#24

Image source: Daniel Uhlfelder

Statue of Charles Linn (Captain in the Confederate Navy) in Birmingham, Alabaman, toppled on May 31, 2020 by protestors who unsuccessfully attempted to remove the nearby Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument.

#25

Image source:  Sarah Stierch

Slave Auction Block in Fredericksburg, Virginia, taken down on June 5, 2020 as a symbol of racial oppression.

#26

Image source: Ser Amantio di NicolaoChe

Statue of Appomattox in Alexandria, Virginia, removed on June 2, 2020, was planned for removal after long discussions by the owner, United Daughters of the Confederacy.

#27

Image source:  Hal Jespersen

Monument to Robert E. Lee (Confederate General) in New Orleans, Louisiana, taken down on May 19, 2017 as part of a removal of four monuments associated with the Confederacy.

#28

Image source: CBS

Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Birmingham, Alabama, removed in June, 2020, said to be taken down to ease continuing unrest originating from the George Floyd protests.

#29

Image source: Martin Falbisoner

Jefferson Davis Memorial in Richmond, Virginia, taken down on June 10, 2020 by protesters for depicting Jefferson Davis, a slave owner.265 shares

Aušrys Uptas 

One day, this guy just kind of figured – “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending on the web. Some things that always pique his interest are old technologies, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness. So if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

Got wisdom to pour?

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!

WHAT’S UP WITH PINEAPPLES AND PALM MOTIFS?

posted on 05/07/2018 By Kadie Yale

While not overwhelming, particular palm motifs consistently poked their head out from around booths during this year’s HD Expo, mirroring the notifications we receive in the form of press releases: palm fronds, abstracted and repeating, have continued to be used in the industry, particularly in the hospitality market.

Updated to match current trends, the use of palms has a very direct relation to the historic use of pineapples in American design. But why does the now-somewhat-kitschy use of pineapples and other lush tropical vegetation continue to be prevalent in American design, and what does it mean for contemporary interiors?

Interestingly, pineapples are one of the design staples brought over to the colonies from England. The fruit is said to have been brought back to Europe during Christopher Columbus’ second voyage, and its many versions–from candied to jam–became a must-have in the upper echelons of society. However, access to raw and unprocessed pineapple was a luxury even those at the top of the class structure could hardly get ahold of.

Transporting the fruit in time meant it had to be shipped on the quickest boats in the fleet, and few were able to make it before turning. Therefore, it became a status symbol to be able to have the fresh fruit. Even King Charles II commissioned a portrait with a pineapple in-hand. While transportation became easier along the North American seaboard as the colonies expanded, pineapples were still a costly commodity; they quickly became a preferred high-society hostess gift, thereby cementing its on-going legacy as a symbol of hospitality.

While pineapple motifs are still used, they somewhat lost their luster in the mid-20th century when technology and materiality allowed them to be incorporated into the growing middle class through goods like wallpaper and clothing textiles. The fruit took off in popular culture, due heavily to Hawai’i becoming a state on August 21, 1959. In the same ways that America saw Egyptian motifs in the 1920s after the discovery of King Tut or Japanese-influenced design in the mid-19th century, the welcoming of Hawai’i to the United States became exoticized.

A LONG HISTORY OF PINEAPPLE MOTIFS

Today, information can be easily found on the history of pineapple motifs in interior design, but for the most part, their use has continued more often because of the mid-20th-century inspiration. Ask an interior designer why they’ve chosen to use tropical foliage or a manufacturer why it’s entered their line, and the answers are typically in response to the fun aesthetic and relaxing aura pineapple and palms give off.

It’s an easy connection to say that pineapple icons evolved into the use of other tropical plants in decor, but I believe we can take it one step further to interweave the current importance of health and wellness into the reemergence of tropical prints.

As clients and end-users become more familiar with biomimicry and biophilic design, interior designers are searching for ways to bring nature indoors. With nature-inspired design on the rise, florals were reintroduced into interiors, but while pineapples mostly harken back to images of a 50’s father in a Hawaiian t-shirt next to the grill in a newly-developed suburb, florals have a tradition of easily crossing the line into appearing matronly (most likely due to gender bias, but that topic deserves its own article). Companies such as Tarkett have been able to release floral products in recent years, but they come alongside more abstracted designs to tone down the flower patterns.

PALM MOTIFS & FLOWERS

Working with flowers, and working with flowers well is a special skill few possess.

Tropical motifs, however, haven’t had the same type of gender bias that flowers have. The historical tie-in to hospitality may not be as direct as it was in the past, but the image of palms, pineapples, and birds of paradise still inspire the feeling of luxury, relaxation, and getting away from it all. Eliciting these emotions while also pulling in biophilic design principals packages the whole aesthetic into the perfect “Wish you were here!” statement.

Two notable instances during the HD Expo show were the use of more mid-century design and repeat by Innovations, and an abstracted block-print-like design by Fil Doux. In particular, these two examples show the main ways in which interior designers are using tropical greenery: in traditional, realistic ways (Innovations), or by breaking down the pattern to only its geometric elements (Fil Doux).

Designers can expect to continue to see pineapples, palms, and more tropically-integrated products in the coming years. While they may not take center-stage or be the highlight of the collection, they will continue to emerge.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here!