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Tag Archives: CEO

Number of U.S. architects continues to rise

New data from NCARB reveals that the number of architects continues to increase.

JUNE 19, 2019 |

Courtesy Pixabay

The number of architects licensed in the United States rose to 115,316 in 2018, according to the annual Survey of Architectural Registration Boards. This is a 2% increase from 2017 and represents a 13% increase compared to the number of U.S. architects seen a decade ago.

Conducted annually by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the survey provides exclusive insight into data from the architectural licensing boards of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the Northern Mariana Islands, which rejoined NCARB in 2018.

The increase in the number of architects is even more apparent when compared to the U.S. population: While the number of architects licensed in the U.S. has risen over 13% in the last decade, the total U.S. population has risen just 7%, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“This year’s data suggests that the profession is healthy and growing—and that NCARB’s services are just as important now as they were when our organization was founded 100 years ago,” said NCARB CEO Michael J. Armstrong.

Additional data from the upcoming 2019 NCARB by the Numbers regarding NCARB’s 100 years of history reflects the increased demand for the organization’s services. There are now over 115,000 individuals who hold an active NCARB Record, including nearly 41,000 candidates pursuing architectural licensure—a 1% increase in both Record holders and candidates compared to 2017.

The 2018 Survey of Architectural Registration Boards also reveals that there continue to be more reciprocal (outof-state) licenses than resident licenses issued in the U.S. There were 125,475 reciprocal licenses reported in 2018, which is largely unchanged from the amount seen in 2017. The steady number of reciprocal licenses indicates the effectiveness of the mobility pathway established by NCARB and the architectural licensing boards.

The survey reflects registration data from January to December 2018. Additional data on the path to licensure will be available in July’s 2019 edition of NCARB by the Numbers. To learn more about NCARB’s data and the Survey of Architectural Registration Boards, visit www.ncarb.org.

Continue reading Number of U.S. architects continues to rise

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CBRE Furniture Forum Sparks Launch of Two Industry Disruptors

Husband-and-wife team Jeffrey and Lindsay Braun.

Nearly two years ago, commercial real estate company, CBRE, embarked on a yearlong journey to uncomplicate the process behind furniture buying. The question was simple: What can we do better? In November 2017, the CBRE Furniture Forum released a list of 15 recommendations designed to unravel the complicated web of the furniture-buying process. The high-level, process-improvement ideas include, among others, bringing a dealer designer in as a sub to the A&D firm and increasing process efficiency.

Fast-forward to spring 2018, when the owners of a Los Angeles furniture company read the results and recommendations of the CBRE study with great interest. The report’s results prompted husband-and-wife team Jeffrey and Lindsay Braun to make a dramatic decision: sell their 17-year-old company, Jeffrey Braun Furniture, to pioneer something new.

Enter Platform, an in-house furniture design and manufacturing division of Unisource Solutions, and Emblem, a company that breaks the mold of contract furniture acquisition.

Lindsay Braun, founder and CEO of Emblem, explains what provoked the pivot: “There were problems and inefficiencies in the old model that drove Jeffrey and me nuts. We were frustrated with the multiple layers between our company and the end user. There were so many opportunities for incorrect interpretations and faulty assumptions,” she says. “It felt good to see the problems we were experiencing addressed in black and white by the Furniture Forum. Jeffrey and I were fully worn down by the current sales process, and we thought, Do we still want to do this? Is this solving the end users’ problem? How could we expand on this model?”

Addressing the Need for Enhanced Dealer-Designer Relationships

At the time, Lindsay and Jeffrey thought perhaps they could be a dedicated vendor for one of their strongest dealer clients, Unisource Solutions. But instead, Jeffrey was recruited by Unisource Solutions and now serves as executive vice president of Platform, its new, in-house design and manufacturing division—a direct result of the dealer-designer prediction from the Furniture Forum.

“We approached Unisource’s leadership with an idea and a feeling that we could all be doing a better job servicing customers,” Jeffrey explains. “I had designed furniture for several of Unisource’s clients over the years and worked with their team as a vendor. Rick and I started talking about the possibilities of doing away with the vendor layer altogether.”

Fox Aftershock / Custom seating, Platform by Unisource Solutions.

Rick Bartlett, president of Unisource Solutions, says his team had already been discussing the best way to innovate new solutions and create greater efficiency for their clients. “The timing was perfect,” Bartlett says. “We knew that our clients and the A&D community were actively searching for residential-inspired, ancillary furniture for their workspaces. The demand for this type of furniture was increasing, and we needed a new approach. Jeffrey’s knowledge of furniture design and manufacturing enabled us to innovate an entirely different solution.”

As part of Platform, Jeffrey is now designing custom furniture for clients at Unisource Solutions. In less than a year, Jeffrey and his team have installed furniture for Google, Warner Brothers’ Music, and Aftershock Games, helping each of these companies reflect its brand, culture, and vision in its spaces with bespoke furniture solutions. By integrating the designer into the dealer model earlier in the process, the company can condense the timeline and provide an open line of communication between the designer and the account manager/dealer.

Custom seating for Google Spruce Goose project, Platform by Unisource Solutions.

And Jeffrey’s not stopping there.

“We’ve designed an exclusive line of furniture available only from Unisource Solutions,” he says. “These are workhorse seating designs that every office environment needs, but because I’m working closely with local manufacturers, we also offer easy custom adjustments. Our goal is to give our clients more control, better design, and greater efficiency with every project.”

Streamlining Delivery Time Through Process Integration

While Jeffrey Braun was eliminating frustrations and boosting creativity at the dealership level, Lindsay Braun was working on an entirely different set of pain points. In the past several years, she had noticed more of her designer and dealership clients specifying and buying residential retail furniture instead of contract furniture. She was asking herself, How can I provide a quick and easy commercial-grade solution?

Lindsay acknowledged that Jeffrey Braun Furniture was simply not set up to take on this challenge, so she began working on Emblem: a vertically integrated contract furniture company designed with the lofty goal of delivering commercial-grade construction, fabric, details, and finishes in just three to four weeks.

Simply stated, Emblem is setting out to offer the online retail experience with commercial-grade quality.

Emblem’s Bend Sofa, Bend Chair, and Capital Chair.

Scheduled to launch this month, Emblem initially will offer 17 seating designs with seven fabric offerings and four metal finish options. Each piece is designed and built in California. Dealerships and designers will receive a trade discount, but business owners will also be able to buy online directly from Emblem’s website.

“I wanted to give designers and dealerships a quick furniture solution they would feel confident about,” Lindsay explains. “Emblem is beautifully designed. It’s built for high-use environments. Our textiles are commercial grade with stain resistance and a minimum 100,000 double rubs. Emblem has the same high quality that designers expect in furniture for their commercial projects.”

Responding to concerns about giving businesses a way to buy contract furniture without a dealer, Lindsay says, “Most of these companies are not engaging a dealer. They are buying furniture online because they aren’t being serviced by the contract furniture industry or the dealership model. The more we can help businesses understand the benefit of contract furniture, the more they will find value in a thoughtful, efficient dealership model.

“If a small business needs a sofa and two chairs for a lobby, I want to give them the autonomy to easily find pricing, make a decision, and buy commercial-grade furniture for their own space,” Lindsay continues. “When that same business grows and needs desking systems and other services, they will already see the value in contract furniture versus going the residential retail route.”

Jeffrey Braun, Executive Vice President of Platform and Lindsay Braun, Founder and CEO of Emblem.

When asked why they would sell their furniture business and take on the risks involved with launching two new companies, Lindsay and Jeffrey say the decision was simple. “This all happened in just one year after we heard the results of the CBRE study,” Lindsay states. “The study resonated with us and was a major factor in our decision. Jeffrey and I have always wanted to serve the industry and our clients in the best way we could, and these new ventures are the results. We did this because we believe this is the way the industry should function.”

 Amanda Schneider is President of ThinkLab, the research division of Interior Design magazine. At ThinkLab, we combine Interior Design magazine’s incredible reach within the architecture and design community with proven market research techniques to uncover relevant trends and opportunities that connect back to brand and business goals in a thought-provoking, creative, and actionable way. Join in to know what’s next at https://thinklab.design/join-in/

Continue reading CBRE Furniture Forum Sparks Launch of Two Industry Disruptors

John Edelman Steps Down As CEO of Design Within Reach

Interior Design‘s Cindy Allen and John Edelman. Photography by Ben Meyers.

Design Within Reach (DWR) has announced that its CEO, John Edelman, will be stepping down from his position, effective June 14. He will eventually transition to become the Chairman of the Board of DWR and Herman Miller Consumer. His longtime business partner of 27 years, John McPhee, will stay on as the company’s president. 

Edelman’s design-centric career began in the 1990s, when he joined his brother Sam at his shoe company Sam & Libby. He eventually left to assist his design luminary parents, Teddy and Arthur Edelman, with their business. He became president of the brand in 2001 and eventually sold the iconic leather company to Knoll for $67 million in 2007. It was in 2010 that DWR serendipitously came calling. 

In just four years, Edelman and McPhee brought the company back from death. “It was on the verge of bankruptcy when we took it on,” Edelman recalled. “By 2014, we doubled the size of the business and halved the number of stores down to 35. The company became incredibly profitable.” 

The natural next step to assure DWR’s continued rousing success was to find a partner whose aesthetic would naturally complement DWR’s modernist approach and business acumen would propel the brand to new heights. And that partner was Herman Miller. “With this partnership, we assured the longevity of our brand and formed an indelible link with one of the most prestigious design companies in the world,” Edelman said. 

Read more: Herman Miller Agrees to Aquire Design Within Reach

With this powerhouse behind DWR, it could start on the work that it’s become famous for: partnering and promoting some of the most exciting brands in the industry. Even just a small, hand-picked selection of names are quite impressive: Hay, Moooi, J.L. Møllers, Brown Jordan, Luceplan, and Gloster. “I’m so proud of all the amazing designers and manufacturers we’ve worked with,” said Edelman. “DWR played such a large role in making modern design mainstream through the designers we chose to partner with and the more than 10 million catalogs we sent out that contain their stories. We helped break them out of the sheltered world of interior design and into the vast consumer market.”

When asked what’s changed the most in the past nine years, Edelman points to the rise of the Internet and E-commerce. The advent of Pinterest, Instagram, and easy access to designers through websites and email has made it easier for the consumer to become passionate and educated about design. The one thing that Edelman believes hasn’t changed? The enduring excellence of modernist aesthetics. “Modern isn’t a trend. It’s forever,” he noted. 

As for his future, Edelman continued: “It’s been an incredible 20 years being a part of this industry, but I’ve been on a plane nearly every other week since 1988. I plan to take a little time off, but I’m not leaving forever. There’s still so much to see and do with design.” 

Read more: Jens Risom Sketches Are Brought to Life in Design With Reach’s Block Island Collection

Continue reading John Edelman Steps Down As CEO of Design Within Reach

MoreySmith Tailors a Sartorially-Minded Headquarters for British Menswear Brand Dunhill

PROJECT NAME Dunhill
LOCATION London
FIRM MoreySmith
SQ. FT. 21,100 SQF

For Dunhill, a British menswear and leather goods brand synonymous with the term English gentleman, MoreySmith has tailored a bespoke headquarters rife with sartorial details. The heritage brand founded in 1893 occupies the erstwhile St. Petersburg Hotel in Mayfair, London, a storied 1908 red-brick building that once served as a wartime officers’ hospital. Previously, Dunhill’s 170 staffers were spread across multiple levels of a building in neighboring Marylebone—and separated even further from their showroom, located 10 minutes away. Consolidating the business under a single roof therefore topped CEO Andrew Maag’s priorities. 

MoreySmith’s headquarters for Dunhill, a luxury British menswear company, occupies a 1908 heritage building in London’s Mayfair, not far from the brand’s flagship store. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

The new 21,100-square-foot premises locates reception, showrooms, meeting and break-out rooms, a boardroom, and an outdoor terrace on the fourth floor, with the level below accommodating open-plan plug-and-play work areas, plus the creative studio where the designers hash out their plans for the upcoming season.

Local firm MoreySmith—which has transformed workplaces for such brands as Moët Hennessy, Sony, and ASOS—won Maag over with its proposed inventive structural tweaks. To wit: a statement staircase in black steel linking the two levels, a lightwell to increase access to natural light, and a bold extension that would create a new rooftop terrace, and, overlooking it, a spacious, light-filled boardroom.

Flooring is smoked oak in a bespoke chevron pattern by White & White. Door pulls feature custom folded-brass ironmongery. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

 

Flexibility reigns throughout the design, with rotating racks on which to hang garments and mirrored partitions in the showrooms used to divide or visually extend the space. Hand-blown fluted pendants light meeting rooms. Low-slung blackened ash and leather lounge chairs form vignettes in reception. Maag and principal architect Linda Morey-Burrows visited showrooms together to select every furnishing. (“We fed off his passion and energy,” she dishes of her design-savvy client.)

A powder-coated steel staircase links the previously unconnected floors. Its stitched leather handrail refers back to the brand’s leather goods. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

 

Morey-Burrows took inspiration from the quality and masculinity of the brand, incorporating elements from its collections, such as saddlery stitching and brass hardware, in the design. Horsehair panels (used to structure the shoulders in Dunhill jackets) upholster a wall in reception while stitched leather wraps the reception desk and staircase handrail. Herringbone—that menswear classic—further threads Dunhill’s DNA throughout. Flooring is smoked oak in a chevron pattern; the same graphic details glass walls.

A roof terrace extension gives staffers access to outside space and the adjacent boardroom, with a custom PearsonLloyd Peggy conference table by SCP, is flooded with daylight. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

The palette was conceived with longevity in mind, Morey-Burrows continues. “We adopted high quality, durable materials that will remain pristine long into occupation.” (Or patinate with charm, as in the leather handrails and brass door pulls.) Either way, Dunhill’s headquarters is now an apt expression of the brand, from its aura of sober refinement to its commitment to British craftsmanship.

Keep scrolling for more images from this project >

Space Copenhagen‘s Rén stained ash and leather lounge chairs for Stellar Works huddle around a McCollin Bryan Lens resin-top coffee table in a break-out area. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
Walkways open up the space between the creative studio and other areas of the business, providing more natural light. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
A lightwell in the same metal and finish as the staircase funnels more sunshine inside. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
The 21,100-square-foot headquarters consolidates all 170 staffers and all aspects of the company—showrooms, creative, and head office—under one roof, with room for 40 percent employee growth. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
A frosted chevron pattern derived from menswear details glass. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant. 

Read more: Gensler Fashions a New Brooklyn Showroom for Lafayette 148

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On the Move: Recent Top Promotions and Hires

FLOS

Roberta Silva (pictured at left) has been named CEO of Flos. She was selected by the group’s shareholders together with Piero Gandini, the entrepreneur who sold Flos to Design Holding. As CEO, she will carry forward the brand’s history of excellence and guide the company into a new phase of growth.

York Wallcoverings

Vincent Santini has been named vice president and general manager of York Brands. He will oversee all sales and support for York’s residential and commercial businesses. The company, approaching its 125th year in 2020, hopes to grow its reach in over 85 countries.

WeWork

James Slade has joined the design team at WeWork as VP of architecture. He will work with SVP of architecture Michael Rojkind and chief architect Bjark Ingles on all ground-up projects. Slade co-founded Slade Architecture with his partner, Hayes Slade, in 2002, and has built projects in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

Ware Malcomb

Joshua Thompson (pictured at right) has been promoted to studio manager, interior architecture and design in Ware Malcomb’s downtown San Diego office. He previously served as senior project manager for the past five years in the Phoenix office. He will lead Ware Malcomb’s interior architecture & design studio in San Diego and manage select projects.

R&A Architecture & Design

Culver City-based R&A Architecture & Design is rebranding their firm to OfficeUntitled and expanding the leadership team, made up of principals Christian Robert, Benjamin Anderson, Shawn Gehle and Lindsay Green. Recent projects include Woodlark Hotel in Portland, The Cayton Children’s Museum in Santa Monica, and the Harland in Beverly Hills.

The Switzer Group

Sabrina Pagani has joined The Switzer Group’s Manhattan team as principal. She will oversee a number of high-profile workplace interiors out of the nationally ranked interior architecture firm’s New York studio.

BDG Architecture + Design

BDG Architecture + Design is opening a new studio in New York, expanding into the North American market. BDG’s global chief creative officer, Colin Macgadie will provide creative direction for the studio. Kelly D. Powell and Rebecca Wu-Norman will be studio leads.

TRIO

Ericka Moody has joined TRIO as regional vice president. Moody is a 30-year veteran of the interior design industry and has overseen hundreds of successful national and international projects. TRIO has expanded its work in California significantly over the last several years and has recently completed dozens of projects, including work with Touchstone Communities, Shea Homes, and Simpson Property Group.

Perkins + Will

Maha Sabra has been promoted to associate principal in the New York studio of Perkins + Will in support of the healthcare practice. In the past five years at the studio, she has transitioned from a design practitioner to project manager. As a senior project manager, Sabra plays a central role leading the studio’s healthcare teams.

HOK

Kimberly Dowdell (pictured at right) has returned to HOK as director of business development in Chicago. Dowdell is a licensed architect with a wealth of expertise in strategic planning, design, project management, housing policy, and real estate development. She previously worked in HOK’s New York studio from 2008-2011.

Wilson Associates

Kathleen Lynch has joined the Dallas studio of Wilson Associates as operations director. Lynch has 15 years of professional experience as a LEED-accredited interior designer and field manager. She will oversee teams on a roster of hospitality projects in Nevada, California, and other areas across the Southwest.

WRNS Studio

Kevin Wilcock has joined WRNS Studio as associate principal. He brings 25 years experience leading affordable and market-rate housing projects. He will be based out of WRNS Studio’s Honolulu office, guiding the studio’s multi-family housing practice with a focus on the Pacific region.

Read more: On the Move: April’s Top Promotions and Hires

Continue reading On the Move: Recent Top Promotions and Hires

Material Bank Lab, Offering Speed and Sustainability, Debuts at NeoCon

Material Bank Lab debuted at NeoCon in theMART and will operate there for at least a year. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Material Bank debuted its first physical location, Material Bank Lab, at NeoCon today. The first-floor location at theMART in Chicago (#113) will remain a permanent storefront, giving specifiers a place to explore, discover, and collaborate.

Adam Sandow, CEO and founder of SANDOW, developed Material Bank’s revolutionary platform.

 

“We opened Material Bank Lab with the intention of creating a completely new way for designers to discover and interact with brands and the products they create,” says Adam Sandow, CEO and founder of SANDOW, who developed Material Bank’s proprietary platform to answer the architecture and design community’s need to streamline and speed up the material searching and sampling process. And Sandow would know as the owner of leading design brands, including Interior Design, Luxe Interiors + Design, Material ConneXion, and ThinkLab.

Material Bank Lab will give design professionals access to the platform’s new cutting-edge Material Desk technology and Smart Swatch system. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The Material Bank Lab will also give design professionals access to the platform’s new cutting-edge Material Desk™ technology and Smart Swatch™ system, as well as to Material Bank’s material experts. “Our Smart Swatches are a revolutionary system that dramatically improves the efficiency of sampling by seamlessly bridging the physical to digital,” says Sandow, adding that the interactive Material Desk™ will also help designers create digital palettes and sample with a click of a button.  

Thousands of physical materials are on view at the new Material Bank Lab at theMART in Chicago. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Material Bank’s powerful platform, which is becoming the go-to resource for designers when it comes to samples, allows specifiers to search textiles, wall coverings, flooring, paint, solid surfacing, and other materials from more than 160 leading manufacturers—in one place. What previously took two-plus hours trolling 12 websites and entailed five packages delivered over many days is now reduced to three minutes of browsing on one centralized site. And an order sent in by Midnight (EST) is delivered in a recyclable box by 10:30 am the next day.

Material Bank Lab works in a revolutionary new manner that can ship materials overnight for sampling and specification. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Material Desk technology makes it easy for design professionals to access materials from over 160 leading manufacturers. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Material Bank Lab is located on the first floor of theMART (#113) in Chicago. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Interested in exploring materials in a revolutionary way? Visit Material Bank Lab on the first floor (#113) of theMART in Chicago. 

Continue reading Material Bank Lab, Offering Speed and Sustainability, Debuts at NeoCon

MoreySmith Tailors a Sartorially-Minded Headquarters for British Menswear Brand Dunhill

PROJECT NAME Dunhill
LOCATION London
FIRM MoreySmith
SQ. FT. 21,100 SQF

For Dunhill, a British menswear and leather goods brand synonymous with the term English gentleman, MoreySmith has tailored a bespoke headquarters rife with sartorial details. The heritage brand founded in 1893 occupies the erstwhile St. Petersburg Hotel in Mayfair, London, a storied 1908 red-brick building that once served as a wartime officers’ hospital. Previously, Dunhill’s 170 staffers were spread across multiple levels of a building in neighboring Marylebone—and separated even further from their showroom, located 10 minutes away. Consolidating the business under a single roof therefore topped CEO Andrew Maag’s priorities. 

MoreySmith’s headquarters for Dunhill, a luxury British menswear company, occupies a 1908 heritage building in London’s Mayfair, not far from the brand’s flagship store. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

 

The new 21,100-square-foot premises locates reception, showrooms, meeting and break-out rooms, a boardroom, and an outdoor terrace on the fourth floor, with the level below accommodating open-plan plug-and-play work areas, plus the creative studio where the designers hash out their plans for the upcoming season.

Local firm MoreySmith—which has transformed workplaces for such brands as Moët Hennessy, Sony, and ASOS—won Maag over with its proposed inventive structural tweaks. To wit: a statement staircase in black steel linking the two levels, a lightwell to increase access to natural light, and a bold extension that would create a new rooftop terrace, and, overlooking it, a spacious, light-filled boardroom.

Flooring is smoked oak in a bespoke chevron pattern by White & White. Door pulls feature custom folded-brass ironmongery. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

 

Flexibility reigns throughout the design, with rotating racks on which to hang garments and mirrored partitions in the showrooms used to divide or visually extend the space. Hand-blown fluted pendants light meeting rooms. Low-slung blackened ash and leather lounge chairs form vignettes in reception. Maag and principal architect Linda Morey-Burrows visited showrooms together to select every furnishing. (“We fed off his passion and energy,” she dishes of her design-savvy client.)

A powder-coated steel staircase links the previously unconnected floors. Its stitched leather handrail refers back to the brand’s leather goods. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

 

Morey-Burrows took inspiration from the quality and masculinity of the brand, incorporating elements from its collections, such as saddlery stitching and brass hardware, in the design. Horsehair panels (used to structure the shoulders in Dunhill jackets) upholster a wall in reception while stitched leather wraps the reception desk and staircase handrail. Herringbone—that menswear classic—further threads Dunhill’s DNA throughout. Flooring is smoked oak in a chevron pattern; the same graphic details glass walls.

A roof terrace extension gives staffers access to outside space and the adjacent boardroom, with a custom PearsonLloyd Peggy conference table by SCP, is flooded with daylight. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.

The palette was conceived with longevity in mind, Morey-Burrows continues. “We adopted high quality, durable materials that will remain pristine long into occupation.” (Or patinate with charm, as in the leather handrails and brass door pulls.) Either way, Dunhill’s headquarters is now an apt expression of the brand, from its aura of sober refinement to its commitment to British craftsmanship.

Keep scrolling for more images from this project >

Space Copenhagen‘s Rén stained ash and leather lounge chairs for Stellar Works huddle around a McCollin Bryan Lens resin-top coffee table in a break-out area. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
Walkways open up the space between the creative studio and other areas of the business, providing more natural light. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
A lightwell in the same metal and finish as the staircase funnels more sunshine inside. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
The 21,100-square-foot headquarters consolidates all 170 staffers and all aspects of the company—showrooms, creative, and head office—under one roof, with room for 40 percent employee growth. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant.
A frosted chevron pattern derived from menswear details glass. Photography courtesy of Philip Durrant. 

Read more: Gensler Fashions a New Brooklyn Showroom for Lafayette 148

Continue reading MoreySmith Tailors a Sartorially-Minded Headquarters for British Menswear Brand Dunhill

Enter Third Annual Fantini Design Awards to Win a Trip to Italy

Fantini USA is calling for entries from designers and developers who are “inspired by water and passionate about Italian design” for its third annual Fantini Design Awards, which recognize excellence in kitchen and bath design in North America. All entries must be submitted no later than July 9, 2019.

To qualify, entries need to be either a completed project (between January 1, 2017 and May 19, 2019) or future project using Fantini products; located in the United States or Canada; documented with high-resolution, professional photography (completed projects) or a sketch, rendering, and/or floor plan (future projects). Complete contest rules can be found here.

All entries will be judged by Stefano Giussani, CEO of Lissoni, Inc.; William Hanley, editor in chief of Dwell; and Zahid Sardar, editor in chief of SPACES. A total of seven winners—six completed projects and one future project—will be selected on or before August 9, 2019 and one representative per winning project will receive a four-day, all-expenses paid trip in the fall to the Casa Fantini/Lake Time resort designed by Piero Lissoni at Fantini’s headquarters in Pella, Italy.

Read more: Fantini Reveals Winners of Second Annual Design Awards

Continue reading Enter Third Annual Fantini Design Awards to Win a Trip to Italy

John Edelman Steps Down As CEO of Design Within Reach

Interior Design‘s Cindy Allen and John Edelman. Photography by Ben Meyers.

Design Within Reach (DWR) has announced that its CEO, John Edelman, will be stepping down from his position, effective June 14. He will eventually transition to become the Chairman of the Board of DWR and Herman Miller Consumer. His longtime business partner of 27 years, John McPhee, will stay on as the company’s president. 

Edelman’s design-centric career began in the 1990s, when he joined his brother Sam at his shoe company Sam & Libby. He eventually left to assist his design luminary parents, Teddy and Arthur Edelman, with their business. He became president of the brand in 2001 and eventually sold the iconic leather company to Knoll for $67 million in 2007. It was in 2010 that DWR serendipitously came calling. 

In just four years, Edelman and McPhee brought the company back from death. “It was on the verge of bankruptcy when we took it on,” Edelman recalled. “By 2014, we doubled the size of the business and halved the number of stores down to 35. The company became incredibly profitable.” 

The natural next step to assure DWR’s continued rousing success was to find a partner whose aesthetic would naturally complement DWR’s modernist approach and business acumen would propel the brand to new heights. And that partner was Herman Miller. “With this partnership, we assured the longevity of our brand and formed an indelible link with one of the most prestigious design companies in the world,” Edelman said. 

Read more: Herman Miller Agrees to Aquire Design Within Reach

With this powerhouse behind DWR, it could start on the work that it’s become famous for: partnering and promoting some of the most exciting brands in the industry. Even just a small, hand-picked selection of names are quite impressive: Hay, Moooi, J.L. Møllers, Brown Jordan, Luceplan, and Gloster. “I’m so proud of all the amazing designers and manufacturers we’ve worked with,” said Edelman. “DWR played such a large role in making modern design mainstream through the designers we chose to partner with and the more than 10 million catalogs we sent out that contain their stories. We helped break them out of the sheltered world of interior design and into the vast consumer market.”

When asked what’s changed the most in the past nine years, Edelman points to the rise of the Internet and E-commerce. The advent of Pinterest, Instagram, and easy access to designers through websites and email has made it easier for the consumer to become passionate and educated about design. The one thing that Edelman believes hasn’t changed? The enduring excellence of modernist aesthetics. “Modern isn’t a trend. It’s forever,” he noted. 

As for his future, Edelman continued: “It’s been an incredible 20 years being a part of this industry, but I’ve been on a plane nearly every other week since 1988. I plan to take a little time off, but I’m not leaving forever. There’s still so much to see and do with design.” 

Read more: Jens Risom Sketches Are Brought to Life in Design With Reach’s Block Island Collection

16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3DaysofDesign

It’s not every day that a genuinely disruptive new product enters the marketplace. But an innovative new collection of textiles from Duvaltexpromises to not only transform the future of sustainable textile specification, but also substantially reduce the impact of polyester textiles on the biosphere with a whole new model for end-of-life recycling or disposal. To be introduced at NeoCon in June, the company’s new Clean Impact Textiles were created with a simple mission: To be the first biodegradable recycled polyester textiles for commercial interiors.

Clean Impact Textiles by Duvaltex. Image courtesy of Duvaltex.

 

A key to the game-changing new line of textiles is a biocatalyst additive, which is blended with polyester chips during the extrusion process in the manufacture of the yarn. The biocatalyst facilitates the biodegradation of the textiles by interacting with the moisture and microbes inherent in landfill and anaerobic wastewater treatment conditions and thereby activating a metabolizing process that increases the degradation rate of the new polyester to 91 percent versus 6 percent for standard polyester. This means that the new Clean Impact Textiles will safely biodegrade at the essentially same rate as natural fibers—roughly over three and a half years versus 100 years or more for virgin polyester.

Read more: Interface Panel at Innovation Conference Discusses Sustainability in Design and Reversing Climate Change

The achievement is significant because, despite the design industry’s best intentions to recycle, 99 percent of polyester textiles eventually wind up in the landfill, according to a report called the Advancing Sustainable Materials Management Fact Sheet from the EPA. “Based on the alarming statistics regarding the amount of textile waste that ends up in landfills, this collection of fabrics represents eco-efficiency by design at its best and a crucial step forward in reducing the negative impact of a linear economy,” said Alain Duval, CEO of Duvaltex, who added that since the innovative new commercial textiles can either be safely disposed a landfill or recycled for further use, they offer both biological and technical solutions at the end of their useful life. Duval also hopes the new Clean Impact Textiles collection will inspire others to follow Duvaltex’s lead in offering not just eco-friendly biodegradable textiles, but sustainable solutions like the bi-circular economy model inherent in the new fabrics.

Clean Impact Textiles by Duvaltex. Image courtesy of Duvaltex.

 

More good news: The Clean Impact Textiles were manufactured to conform to the strict performance requirements of the commercial interiors market, and all meet or exceed the ACT performance standards for heavy-duty upholstery without compromising on color, pattern or hand in order to achieve their biodegradable benefit. The fabrics in this collection have also been assessed and certified for the NSF/ANSI 336 standard for commercial interiors textiles and carry the Facts Gold certification mark owned by ACT. And the biocatalyst technology used in the development of the biodegradable recycled polyester yarn used for the collection was tested under ASTM D5511 and has also achieved ECO PASSPORT certification by OEKO-TEX.

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A leader in sustainable initiatives for more than 20 years, Duvaltex’s innovative Clean Impact Textiles collection includes five lines—Balance, Catalyst, Environs, Renew and Terra—that offer small-, medium- and large-scale “softened” geometric patterns and solids in multiple colorways and coordinating neutrals. The collection will be commercially available through office furniture OEM’s and textile marketers this fall. Though slightly higher in price than standard polyester fabrics in similar constructions, the company’s goal is to ultimately achieve price neutrality for the new textiles and a new line will be introduced in early 2020.

Clean Impact Textiles launches at NeoCon 2019 (June 10-12), booth 9041, 7th floor.

Clean Impact Textiles by Duvaltex. Image courtesy of Duvaltex.

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