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Tag Archives: Carolyn Ames Noble

2020 Design Trends: Color, Materials + Finish

08/30/2018 Carolyn Ames Noble

The year 2020 all at once seems so futuristic and yet just around the corner. As we approach the next decade in design, we look to both the future and the past to conceive new products and methods. 

To disseminate color, material, and finishes for 2019 and 2020, three key themes were defined: the engineered environment, organic emotion and colorful collaboration. From these three leading macro themes, several indicators of a staying trend emerged. As part of this quest, design leaders throughout the interiors product category space weighed in on the direction.

Throughout the three trend stories, the pursuit to preserve nature is omnipresent.

Engineered Environment

In the first trend, engineered environment, nature itself is seemingly created or enhanced from the technological lab and placed back into earth. Science becomes symbiotic with design. Sustainability is a straightforward baseline to any good design solution. Designers incorporate science and new methodologies to create solutions that are long-lasting and perseverant.

In that vein, we have seen much material attention paid to recycled plastics and new composites. Ecobirdy created a children’s furniture line of 100-percent recycled plastics from used and discarded toys. Further, it has even penned a children’s storybook based on its practice as an early introduction to the circular economy. Terrazzo will continue to be an important material of color and pattern forward experimentation. We will also see a rise of new and interesting resins made, such as Laurent Peacock’s Piper, which features peppercorns or Himalayan salt.

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Photography by Laurent Peacock

Wood is thoughtfully transformed. Yael Reboh was inspired by layered combinations and the exploration of merging existing materials to form a new one with its own set of characteristics and properties. Her Primavera armchair, a 2018 Lexus Design Award finalist, is exemplary. Says Reboh: “I was fascinated by the aesthetic that the layered combination created, the versatile expressions achieved from each material, like soft versus hard, cracking versus incomplete, flexible versus stable.” ​ Genisher

The color story imitates and engineers nature. Finishes are tactile and speculative, from highly lustrous to innate, unvarnished surfaces. Blue is bright and saturated, together with a true yellow set against taupe, forest green and deep teal, highlighted by pure white and soft petal pink.


Photography by Nimrod

Organic Emotion

In our second trend story of organic emotion, nature is rooted and still and empathy is profound. Similar to the design community’s embrace of sustainability in the early 2000s, health and wellness finds a central place of meaningful planning. Smart or wearable technology is human-centered and beautifully designed. Water conversation is paramount. The immersion into nature is physiological.

Clean water filtration becomes both experiential and approachable in alluring vessels. Pratik Ghosh uses live plants and fauna to filtrate water in Drop-by-Drop.

Megan McClendon is the commercial design leader at Formica Corporation, and describes an intersection of humanity and technology. “Digital dominance is challenged by embracing sound, sight, touch and taste,” McClendon explains. “Immersive building environments focus on our primal needs by mimicking our circadian rhythms, improving the air we breathe and cocooning us in sensorial comfort. There is a dreamy quality, a softness and introspective feel that allows us to put aside busy thoughts and access our emotions.”

Biophilia in Design

Biophilia is the human’s intrinsic need for interaction with nature and we nurture ourselves.

Jayson Simeon, Global design leader, Moen and The House of Rohl, considers what he sees as “macro trends, wellness and biophilia, being influencers promoting revitalization through organic elements that are crafted, not molded.”


Photography by Stylus Inc.

“Bath spaces, in particular are transforming into microcosmic destinations in the home – a space of solace, reflection and rejuvenation as opposed to the hallmark catalyst of your daily routine,” Simeon says. “In the bath, we are seeing new materials like volcanic limestone and others that are naturally warmer to the touch than traditional enameled tub or sink surfaces, making the bath experience more relaxing right from the start, while using less hot water to heat and maintain bath temperatures.”

Benjamin Pardo, Knoll design director, describes how commercial office furnishings featuring natural soft touch materials, including veneer and cork, will continue to be popular for open plan and private office spaces.

Colors in this palette include distilled off-white, khaki and jute brown, and infused with sundrenched gold, grayed blue-violet and jade green. Metamerism, the apparent shift in color, will be embraced as an authentic design quality. Finishes appear cloudlike, layered and interesting, streaked with metallic threads against medium-toned wood grain.

Collaboration

Positive change is on the horizon in the third and final color forward collaboration. More than an age categorization, Generation Z is the new multicultural face of America. As they enter the consumer space, they bring a dynamic and inherently inclusive mindset, which largely influences the third trend story and its new collaborative spirit. The women’s movement celebrates 100 years of voting in the United States. The global viewpoint is also at play as the new middle class economies in China and India continue emergence.

Fatigued from the noise of the past several years, design seeks to construct cadence out of the chaos.  Art Deco-like colors and forms were on full display at the 2018 Salone de Milano. When Art Deco originated in 1925 Paris, it was reactionary to what was seen as elitist and overly ornate design. Art Deco’s clean lines were relatable, able to be mass-produced and accessible to all. There is a striking commonality to today’s reintroduction.

Geometry and synchronicity are on full display in this trend. At long last, commercial carpet design will break out of the square. Shaw Contract partnered with Form Us with Love and launched Inside Shapes at Neocon 2018. Explains Reesie Duncan, vice president of global design at Shaw Contract: “Working with Form Us with Love has been a rewarding, highly collaborative process. We began with a lengthy design-thinking exercise to look at the way flooring is installed, how different product surfaces come together and how designers express a spatial narrative with flooring. We were constantly asking, ‘How do we change this? How might we do things differently?’ It was a challenge we were all inspired to pursue together, and having a design partner who did not come from a flooring background was especially exciting as it brought new perspective to the table.” Duncan also mentioned an early mantra for the design development: “Unique shapes working together collaboratively.”

Upcoming Color Palettes

Of color, Emily Kantz, interior designer at Sherwin-Williams, projects the use of Inventive Orange SW 6633, Seawashed Glass SW 9034 and Bora Bora Shore SW 9045. “Inspired by the global community, these colors are bold, uninhibited, optimistic and carefree. The colors are ageless, have a good dose of humor and playfulness and are not overly complicated.” Kantz says of the colors, together with finishes “pairing great with the lighter blond wood tones and matte black. Look for these colors in statement walls, fabrics, furniture and interior accessories.”

Rounding out the color palette, we’ve added bold red, pastel rose and inky indigo. Color and finish work in harmony with pattern, which is graphic and orderly.

Photography by Shaw Contract and Form Us with Love

In 2019 and 2020, there is a shift. Designers have the platform to create meaningful change through a multi-pronged approach of sustainable, resilient and WELL project practices. We look forward to this near and optimistic future – seeing forecasted color, material and finish trends unfold and evolve.


Carolyn Ames Noble, ASID, CMG, is an interior design leader and color + materials enthusiast. She brings an expert assessment through extensive experience in interior design, color marketing and industry trend research.

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ASID Events

NATIONAL
JUN
10
ASID at NeoCon

DESCRIPTION

NeoCon® is the world’s leading platform and most important event of the year for the commercial design industry. With nearly 1 million square feet of exhibition space, NeoCon will feature game-changing products and services from both leading companies and emerging talent–providing unparalleled access to the latest and most innovative solutions in commercial design.

 

DATE AND TIME

8:00 AM
6/10/2019 – 6/12/2019

LOCATION

theMART
222 Merchandise Mart Plaza
Suite 470
Chicago, IL 60654
United States

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KEYNOTE WITH ILSE CRAWFORD OF STUDIOILSE

Date: June 11, 2019
Time: 8 a.m.
Location: NeoCon Theater, 19th Floor, theMart

Stuff Matters: The Material World We Make

Ilse Crawford is a designer, academic, and creative director with a simple mission:  to put human needs and desires at the center of all she does. As founder of Studioilse, together with her multi-disciplinary, London-based team, she brings her philosophy to life. This means creating environments where humans feel comfortable; public spaces that make people feel at home; and homes that are habitable and make sense for the people who live in them. It means designing furniture and products that support and enhance human behavior and actions in everyday life. It means restoring the human balance in brands and businesses that have lost their way.

ASID INSTALLATION

Date: Throughout NeoCon

ASID is thrilled to showcase the impact of design through an exciting new installation custom designed by Elizabeth von Lehe, Allied ASID, design and brand strategy principal, HDR. The space serves as an oasis that invites visitors to engage, ask broad questions, and explore the beautiful, impactful, and sometimes surprising ways that design impacts lives.

ASID PRESENTS INSIGHTS FROM THE 2019 OUTCOME OF DESIGN AWARDS

Date: Wednesday, June 12
Time: 8 a.m.

Following the first-ever Outcome of Design Awards, created in collaboration with NeoCon, Herman Miller, and METROPOLIS magazine, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) will explore how design truly impacts lives as seen through occupancy data and analysis.

The Outcome of Design Awards (OODA) honor firms that showcase the power of design through research-driven results and innovative, humancentric concepts. This panel, moderated by ASID, will explore how this design approach can be implemented across projects and will highlight the 2019 OODA winning projects and the data that clearly says it all.

STUDENT PROGRAMING: DESIGN PATHWAYS

Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Time: 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. (panel); 10:30 a.m. – Noon (tour)

Panelists: Meena Krenek, ASID, Gensler; David Euscher, ASID, LEED AP, Corgan; Carolyn Ames Noble, ASID, Ames Design Studio; David Cordell, ASID, Perkins+Will; Jennifer Quail (Moderator, editor-in-chief, i+D)

Showroom/Exhibit Spaces: Allsteel, Benjamin Moore, Humanscale, Keilhauer, Sherwin Williams, True Residential, Wilsonart, Brown Jordan, Construction Specialties, Teknion and Mohawk

Why are trade shows important to the life of an interior designer? A panel of experienced design professionals will explain why trade shows are essential to your career and why it’s imperative to attend them. Our experts will give you insight on what questions to ask, how to evaluate products, and why it is so critical to your success to make connections and establish strong vendor relationships throughout your career.

After the panel discussion, you will break into small groups and tour the show floor with one of our panelists to receive guidance on how to make the most of your time at these important professional events.

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The Intrinsic Need for Healthy and Sustainable Materials

04.08.2019

Carolyn Ames Noble

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The built environment accounts for over two-thirds of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. In the majority of the places we live, work and play, research has realized that indoor air quality is more polluted than the outdoors, even in the largest industrialized metropolitan areas. This is cause for concern because humans spend over 90% of our time indoors.

The case for healthy and sustainable materials in this time of turbulent climate change is ubiquitous. Sustainable materials help reduce carbon emissions and nurture the overall health of the planet. Harmoniously, healthy materials produce meaningful eudemonia to the inhabitants of the space.


WasteBasedBrick Composition, StoneCycling

These types of holistic spaces are vital, fundamental to the health and equity of humans and to the health of the planet. There’s also an intrinsic and perhaps even a philosophical need for these materials in our dwellings. In the future, perhaps these materials should become the baseline for all building projects.

A Look at Organizations

There are many admirable organizations that support healthy and sustainable design philosophies, included and not limited to:

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American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), founded in 1975, champions that “design impacts lives” and uses evidence-based design and research to demonstrate how.

USGBC began its LEED program mission in 1993. Twenty-six years later, LEED is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. Available for virtually all building, community and home project types, LEED provides a framework to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings.

The International Living Future Institute (ILFI), founded in 2009, defines its mission to make communities socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative. The ILFI’s Living Product Challenge is a philosophy first, advocacy tool and product certification program that defines the most advanced measures of sustainability in product manufacturing today. The Challenge is comprised of seven performance categories called Petals:

  • Place
  • Water
  • Energy
  • Health and happiness
  • Materials
  • Equity
  • Beauty

Launched in 2014 after years of extensive research and development across disciplines, the International Well Building Institute (IWBI) strives to revolutionize the way people think about buildings. It explores how design, operations and behaviors within the places where we live, work, learn and play can be optimized to advance human-health and wellbeing. IWBI offers the WELL certification program focused on seven guiding concepts:

  • Air
  • Water
  • Nourishment
  • Light
  • Fitness
  • Comfort
  • Mind

The mission for viable buildings starts with the people, processes and products that comprise them.

The Product: A Cascade for Sustainability

Wall finish and flooring selections are fundamental on the six planes of interior selections. Paint color is appointed perfectly with coatings like Sherwin-Williams Harmony, which was a green industry-first in 2001. Harmony meets the most stringent VOC regulations and has achieved GREENGUARD Gold Certification satisfying LEED v4 v4.1 criteria. Its additional qualities of odor-eliminating and formaldehyde-reducing technologies help improve indoor air quality by reducing VOCs from possible sources such as cabinets, carpets and fabrics.

 

See more photos from this article on Instagram

Regarding color for spaces of vitality and retreat alike, Emily Kantz, interior designer at the Sherwin-Williams Company, recommends the following palettes:

“The Electric Exploration palette features the striking Rivulet, Rejuvenate and Izmir Purple. These colors bring energy and life into the space. The Off the Grid palette is a breath of fresh air with the nature inspired colors of Almond Roca, Copper Mountain and Cascades, bringing the earthy elements of the great outdoors inside to give us a sense of health and well-being.”

Mohawk Group has a suite of Living Product Challenge Petal-certified flooring including:

  • Lichen carpet plank
  • Nutopia carpet plank
  • Nutopia Matrix carpet Plank
  • Sunweave broadloom/area rug
  • Pivot Point enhanced resilient tile


Mohawk Group SmartFlower Installation, Mohawk Group

Representative of the Living Product Challenge, Sunweave’s Petal Certification aims to leave a handprint rather than a footprint. Mohawk Group engaged in a special handprinting partnership with Groundswell to install 10 SmartFlower solar systemsin underserved communities and at educational institutions with STEM programs across the U.S.

George Bandy Jr., chief sustainability officer at Mohawk Flooring North America, considers the designer’s role expanded well beyond the typical project scope to being the connector between carbon and social change. He asks, “How can the designer bring the enormity of the climate change issue to each individual client and make it personally relevant?”

He considers his own place in the design industry as CSO not as a career pinnacle, but instead part of a greater journey that began in the 1990s at the University of Texas – Houston. He served as the Chairman of the USGBC and worked alongside Ray Anderson at Interface before joining Mohawk Group three years ago.

At Mohawk, Bandy also sees himself as the connector – in his case, connecting the dots between the internal and external product creation, between the industry and the community. He envisions the product as a cascade for sustainability, utilizing sustainable practicesthroughout manufacturing, and leaving a lasting, positive social impact on the communities where Mohawk plants are located.

Waste Reimagined

Striving for a circular economy, designers have reimagined, repurposed and reused what was supposed to be waste. A category of new and innovative composites from plastics and other discarded materials has been invented. Foresso is such a composite: a sheet material composed of timber and wood waste from sawmills.

Conor Taylor, creative director at Foresso, says, “We consider ourselves very lucky to get to work with timber every day, the richness of wood adds warmth to interiors and can make any space more welcoming. Nowadays it is hugely important to consider the sustainability of our work so we endeavor to use every part of the tree in Foresso and hope that by doing so we can encourage others to make the most of this incredible material.”


Foresso Charcoal Mono Detail, Foresso

Tom van Soest and Ward Massa founded StoneCycling in the Netherlands in 2013, their shared vision that the need for reimagined waste products was also the opportunity. They created a building material whose main input is the waste output from construction sites, which massively pollute the earth. Their product, WasteBasedBricks, which as an early prototype was conceived in a homemade industrial blender, has evolved – and their circular and sustainable products are being used across Europe and the U.S.


Ward Massa + Tom van Soest, StoneCycling

Also a product of the Netherlands, the tulip may be the single most iconic image from the region. In fact, 77% of the world’s tulips come from this small country of 12 provinces, comprising for roughly two billion tulips. “Strangely, the most beautiful part of the flower, the head, has no economic value except being a coveted photo object of many a tourist,” says Tjeerd Veenhoven of Studio Tjeerd Veenhoven. By a process of extraction from what would be the waste residual of the dried flower head, pigment is distilled. Color is a wonder in this artisanal process, and applications range from uses in finger paint to biological plastics.


Tulip Pigments, Studio Tjeerd Veenhoven

Mother Nature Engineered

In the quest to save Mother Nature, nature itself is investigated and replicated. Bolt Threads developed Microsilk after studying the silk spun by spiders and produced their own protein. Whereas 60% of fabric fibers are petroleum based, Microsilk is generated mostly of sugar. Bolt Threads has partnered with iconic brands such Patagonia and Stella McCartney. The company currently doesn’t have any specific plans for the interior design material industry, though the brand is excited about what the future holds and will continue to introduce new materials for a more sustainable world.


Bolt Threads Necktie, Bolt Threads

Renee Hytry Derrington, vice president and global design lead at Formica Corporation, reports of the company that the past several years, Formica has introduced a suite of sustainability décor-based products including Reclaimed Denim Fiber and Paper Terrazzo patterns. Reclaimed Denim Fiber is real reclaimed denim fiber made from post-production waste collected at cloth production mills, embedded in paper. No one sheet is alike due to the natural papermaking process, which will be seen as a slight linear direction to the laminate sheet. Paper Terrazzo utilizes small fragments of post-production solid color paper that would otherwise have gone to waste. These paper chips are re-used to create a new paper sheet that is 30 percent reclaimed material. This paper technique uses small-batch craft production so that each sheet is unique and natural.

Bio-based plastics are forecasted to be a $35B business by 2022. Corn starch, sugar, cooking oil and even waste avocado stones are re-engineered for use in this material category. Algae and fungi-created materials will continue to bloom in use and scale. And designers continue seeking solutions reimaging the ultimate waste product – carbon – itself.

“In the future, healthy and sustainability materials will be considered the standard and not called out as special or unique. This will be the result of product designers reusing and reducing waste, considering the human interface and thinking about the environment during the design process,” predicts Hytry Derrington.

Next Up: Creating Unique Glass Lighting Fixtures | NCAA Final “Floor” for the Final Four Revealed

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