Advertisements

Tag Archives: Brooklyn

New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

With NYCxDESIGN and Brooklyn Designs at the Brooklyn Navy Yards about to get underway, we’ve rounded up the most recent projects in New York City’s buzziest borough, including warm cafés and reading rooms, fresh offices, and light-filled apartments.

1. The Center for Fiction by BKSK Architects Brings Books and Sustainability to Brooklyn

The Center for Fiction started out as the Mercantile Library in 1821 and moved locations throughout Manhattan over the years. In 2008, it was rebranded, and more than 10 years later, the Center has a permanent home in a new downtown Brooklyn building by BKSK Architects with sustainability in mind. Read more about the bookstore/library/café

2. StudiosC Creates Positive/Negative Volumes for L&R Distributors in Brooklyn

L&R distributes more cosmetics than any other American company—25 brands and 8,000 SKUs in all. Its new corporate headquarters in Brooklyn’s Industry City circulates something else: a wide variety of staff, each with their own spatial needs, within what StudiosC principal Stephen Conte calls “an industrial blank canvas.” Read more about the office

3. Gensler Fashions a New Brooklyn Showroom for Lafayette 148

Brooklyn’s Navy Yard is among the most fashionable new areas in the borough, but until Lafayette 148 decided to leave its seven-floor SoHo digs and venture across the water, there wasn’t a fashion brand that called the historic concrete warehouse home. Gensler made sure the 68,000-square-foot headquarters, comprised of 15 different departments and large community work cafes, was as rousing as the exterior landscapes. Read more about the showroom

4. Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal. This 2,350-square-foot apartment jettisons the piles of hallways and instead utilizes a gallery to connect public areas to the three bedrooms, while ample natural light floods the expansive open plan. Read more about the brownstone

5. Five Retail Wonderlands Subvert Reality

This retail environment at Gray Matters brings customers into a product-inspired wonderland. Riffing on the brand’s Mildred Egg mule, Bower Studios chose table bases that are ovoids of painted resin composite. See all five stores

6. The Wing Brings Custom-Designed Mother’s Rooms to Brooklyn Office Buildings

When thinking of comfortable and relaxing spaces for a mother to pump or otherwise care for an infant, the office is likely ranked dead last. Audrey Gelman and Lauren Kassan, cofounders of the women’s co-working space, The Wing, want to change that. Gelman and Kassan have mobilized The Wing’s internal design team to bring secure, private spaces for working moms into the close-knit community of offices in DUMBO, starting with office buildings under Two Trees Management. Read more about the rooms

7. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Brews Up a Stumptown Café in a Brooklyn Firehouse

New York relies on coffee shops almost as much as municipal services. Now the two are merging—architecturally, at least—thanks to Stumptown Coffee Roasters’ first Brooklyn café, housed in an 1860’s former firehouse in leafy Cobble Hill. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design re-envisioned, along with the help of Structure NYC, the 1,875-square-foot space, most recently an indoor archery studio. Read more about the café

8. Coliving Goes Grand at a Restored Clinton Hill Mansion

A 6,200-square-foot row house on Grand Street in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn is the newest of Common’s coliving spaces. Built in 1901, Common restored the five-floor home to function for 23 people. Rather than keeping with the two-family tradition, Common densified the historic mansion in order to make the most of the much-desired square footage that Brooklyn has to offer. Read more about the house

9. LOT Office for Architecture Designs Oasis-Like Digs for Devoción in Downtown Brooklyn

When Devoción‘s first location opened in Williamsburg, Brooklynites delighted at the roastery’s oasis-like design and authentic Colombian brews. The beloved coffeehouse has returned for round two with a 1,700-square-foot space near the borough’s bustling downtown corridor. Greek-American firm LOT Office for Architecture spearheaded interiors that honor local traditions and mother nature in equal measure. Read more about the café

10. Inside Ample Hills Creamery’s Brand-New Exhibition Space in Brooklyn

As if the ice cream wasn’t draw enough. Jackie Cuscuna and Brian Smith, founders of Ample Hills Creamery, have just opened the largest ice-cream factory in all of New York City—and have included an interactive museum, like a cherry on top. A brick building, part of the former Beard Street Warehouses complex in Red Hook, contains 12,500 square feet of production space, plus 2,000 more for exhibits, party areas, and of course a retail shop by Danielle Galland Interior Design. Read more about the factory

Continue reading New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

Advertisements

Lucy Harris Studio Invests in a Classic Look for a Financial Services Headquarters

The custom reception desk is honed Arabescato Ovulato marble, framed by slats of rift white oak veneer in an ebonized stain. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

 

When a financial services company needed new offices in Greenwich, Connecticut, its executives wanted the design to embody the firm’s focus on developing long-term client relationships. The headquarters’ ambience, they decided, should not only continue to look fresh as those relationships matured, but also include nods to hospitality to make clients in a jittery financial market feel comfortable. 

Roll & Hill’s Circle pendant hangs above a Knoll table and Bernhardt chairs in the conference room. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

Read more: Vocon Opts for Locally-Inspired Design at Its Cleveland Headquarters

“The architect, Dan Radman, had developed a layout that fostered a strong connection between reception and the board room and another conference room, which are client-centered spaces,” says Lucy Harris, principal of her eponymous design firm. Her team polished up the 10,850 square feet with investment pieces that include Charlotte Perriand sconces and concrete side tables by Francesco Balzano

The pantry area features Gubi stools and Apparatus pendants. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

Executive offices line the perimeter, with open workstations within, all in what Harris calls “a high-contrast palette of white walls, dark furniture, and architectural elements as it felt fresh, clean, and dramatic.” And just in case the pantry and conference rooms are full, private lounge areas are carved out by slatted walls next to reception. “They open up and connect spaces by giving views and light,” Harris says, two qualities any client might appreciate.

Read more: StudiosC Creates Positive/Negative Volumes for L&R Distributors in Brooklyn

A Living Divani sofa and Thomas Hontz Associates tables form the reception seating area, beneath a Serge Mouille chandelier from Studio Twenty Seven. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.
The pantry’s lounge area features Vitra chairs and a Knoll table. Photography by Garrett Rowland, courtesy of Lucy Harris Studio.

 

Read more: Kurz Architects designs a Skateboard-Friendly Office for SinnerSchrader

Continue reading Lucy Harris Studio Invests in a Classic Look for a Financial Services Headquarters

Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

From the Source stools gather at the custom horizontal walnut grain island, lit by Foscarini pendants. Photography by Cheng Lin.

 

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal.

This 2,350-square-foot apartment jettisons the piles of hallways and instead utilizes a gallery to connect public areas to the three bedrooms. Ample natural light floods the expansive open plan. And everywhere founder Idan Naor turned the usual orientation of things on its head. “The flower nook in the guest bathroom is leftover space from a vertical mechanical chase and allows for much-needed counter space,” he notes. Subway tiles are installed in herringbone patterns. “We flipped the grain direction in the kitchen millwork to amplify the composition,” he says. “And even the Sub-Zero fridge doors are flipped from the typical orientation to better accommodate traffic flow in the kitchen.” It’s a cool idea.

An AllModern floor lamp further brightens the sun-drenched master bedroom, with a Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams chair. Photography by Cheng Lin.
In the master bath, a custom teak and limestone vanity supports a Duravit sink and Watermark faucet; behind the MTI soaker bathtub is a wall of Stone Source’s chiseled limestone. Photography by Cheng Lin.
AllModern’s table lamps rest on vintage side tables in the second bedroom. Photography by Cheng Lin.
A rug from Safavieh defines the third bedroom. Photography by Cheng Lin.
Subway and penny tiles from Lazer Marble clad a second full bathroom, with a Toto toilet. Photography by Cheng Lin.
A Louis Poulsen Snowball pendant hangs above a vintage dining table, above herringbone floors of rift and quartered white oak. Photography by Cheng Lin.
Vintage Barcelona chairs boast custom refurbished cushions in the living area, around a vintage Paolo Piva coffee table and DWR sofa. Photography by Cheng Lin.

Continue reading Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

With NYCxDESIGN and Brooklyn Designs at the Brooklyn Navy Yards about to get underway, we’ve rounded up the most recent projects in New York City’s buzziest borough, including warm cafés and reading rooms, fresh offices, and light-filled apartments.

1. The Center for Fiction by BKSK Architects Brings Books and Sustainability to Brooklyn

The Center for Fiction started out as the Mercantile Library in 1821 and moved locations throughout Manhattan over the years. In 2008, it was rebranded, and more than 10 years later, the Center has a permanent home in a new downtown Brooklyn building by BKSK Architects with sustainability in mind. Read more about the bookstore/library/café

2. StudiosC Creates Positive/Negative Volumes for L&R Distributors in Brooklyn

L&R distributes more cosmetics than any other American company—25 brands and 8,000 SKUs in all. Its new corporate headquarters in Brooklyn’s Industry City circulates something else: a wide variety of staff, each with their own spatial needs, within what StudiosC principal Stephen Conte calls “an industrial blank canvas.” Read more about the office

3. Gensler Fashions a New Brooklyn Showroom for Lafayette 148

Brooklyn’s Navy Yard is among the most fashionable new areas in the borough, but until Lafayette 148 decided to leave its seven-floor SoHo digs and venture across the water, there wasn’t a fashion brand that called the historic concrete warehouse home. Gensler made sure the 68,000-square-foot headquarters, comprised of 15 different departments and large community work cafes, was as rousing as the exterior landscapes. Read more about the showroom

4. Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal. This 2,350-square-foot apartment jettisons the piles of hallways and instead utilizes a gallery to connect public areas to the three bedrooms, while ample natural light floods the expansive open plan. Read more about the brownstone

5. Five Retail Wonderlands Subvert Reality

This retail environment at Gray Matters brings customers into a product-inspired wonderland. Riffing on the brand’s Mildred Egg mule, Bower Studios chose table bases that are ovoids of painted resin composite. See all five stores

6. The Wing Brings Custom-Designed Mother’s Rooms to Brooklyn Office Buildings

When thinking of comfortable and relaxing spaces for a mother to pump or otherwise care for an infant, the office is likely ranked dead last. Audrey Gelman and Lauren Kassan, cofounders of the women’s co-working space, The Wing, want to change that. Gelman and Kassan have mobilized The Wing’s internal design team to bring secure, private spaces for working moms into the close-knit community of offices in DUMBO, starting with office buildings under Two Trees Management. Read more about the rooms

7. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Brews Up a Stumptown Café in a Brooklyn Firehouse

New York relies on coffee shops almost as much as municipal services. Now the two are merging—architecturally, at least—thanks to Stumptown Coffee Roasters’ first Brooklyn café, housed in an 1860’s former firehouse in leafy Cobble Hill. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design re-envisioned, along with the help of Structure NYC, the 1,875-square-foot space, most recently an indoor archery studio. Read more about the café

8. Coliving Goes Grand at a Restored Clinton Hill Mansion

A 6,200-square-foot row house on Grand Street in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn is the newest of Common’s coliving spaces. Built in 1901, Common restored the five-floor home to function for 23 people. Rather than keeping with the two-family tradition, Common densified the historic mansion in order to make the most of the much-desired square footage that Brooklyn has to offer. Read more about the house

9. LOT Office for Architecture Designs Oasis-Like Digs for Devoción in Downtown Brooklyn

When Devoción‘s first location opened in Williamsburg, Brooklynites delighted at the roastery’s oasis-like design and authentic Colombian brews. The beloved coffeehouse has returned for round two with a 1,700-square-foot space near the borough’s bustling downtown corridor. Greek-American firm LOT Office for Architecture spearheaded interiors that honor local traditions and mother nature in equal measure. Read more about the café

10. Inside Ample Hills Creamery’s Brand-New Exhibition Space in Brooklyn

As if the ice cream wasn’t draw enough. Jackie Cuscuna and Brian Smith, founders of Ample Hills Creamery, have just opened the largest ice-cream factory in all of New York City—and have included an interactive museum, like a cherry on top. A brick building, part of the former Beard Street Warehouses complex in Red Hook, contains 12,500 square feet of production space, plus 2,000 more for exhibits, party areas, and of course a retail shop by Danielle Galland Interior Design. Read more about the factory

Continue reading New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage

Continue reading 2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage

Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

The 2019 edition of ICFF is just around the corner. From Sunday, May 19 to Tuesday, May 21, ICFF will be open exclusively to trade professionals. New York City’s Javits Convention Center will host products by more than 900 exhibitors from over 60 countries in the high-end interiors space. With so much to see, Interior Design has selected a few standouts to preview ahead of the show. See 10 of them below.

Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini

AK/25 fixture by Paik Sun Kim for Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini. Booth 2163. Photography courtesy of Boffi and Fantini.

 

Boffi and Fantini‘s AK/25 fixture stands out for both its origami-inspired design and its innovation in the water-flow process.

arianeSké

Joy bar chair by Janine Hulsker for arianeSké. Booth 1827. Photography courtesy of arianeské. 

 

Dutch seating designer and manufacturer arianeSké began with a straightforward mission: to bring comfort back to high-end seating. The polished wooden backing of the Joy bar chair gives it a distinguished look.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

Bernhardt

Astra lounge chair by Cory Grosser for Bernhardt. Booths 1339 and 1325. Photography courtesy of Bernhardt.

 

Leave it to Cory Grosser to blend the best of precision—through geometric details and ease—in a curved silhouette. Grosser’s design of the Astra lounge chair for Bernhardt is suited to a variety of aesthetically different spaces.

 Brendan Ravenhill

Beam pendant from Brendan Ravenhill. Booth 857. Photography courtesy of Brendan Ravenhill.

 

Brendan Ravenhill‘s Beam light fixture responds to the efficiency and casting power of LED lighting with style. Beam makes use of bounced and refracted light to create a soft glow, in a strong linear silhouette.

Ceramics of Italy 

The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy. Booths 2229-2325. Photography courtesy of Ceramics of Italy.

 

A distinguished collection of porcelain slabs, The Room collection by Imola Ceramica for Ceramics of Italy exudes drama and luxury. The four available patterns are inspired by exquisite marbles from three continents, with suitable applications ranging from flooring to walls and custom countertops. 

Kohler 

Sensate Touchless Kitchen Faucet with Kohler Konnect. Booth 2239. Photography courtesy of Kohler. 

 

A sleek, no-contact faucet is the stuff of culinary enthusiasts’ dreams. Kohler Konnect immerses users in experiential luxury, with the best of good design and intelligent technology.

Ocrúm

Orizon mirror by Ocrúm. Booth 1062. Photography courtesy of Ocrúm.

 

The Orizon mirror, part of Brooklyn-based design studio Ocrúm‘s debut collection, toes the line between art and functional decor. The rippled surface is evocative of a serene sea, and blends into a smooth colored sky.

Ross Gardam

Nebulae chandelier by Ross Gardam. Booth 1763. Photography by Ross Gardam. Photography © Hadyn Cattach.

 

Ross Gardam brings a redesigned version of his Nebulae chandelier to his eponymous design studio’s ICFF booth. The horizontal configuration is a new aspect of the chandelier’s design, and the uniquely-layered glass shows a highly original exploration of light’s diffusion.

Studio Henk

Co lounge chairs; 2.5 seat sofa (left) and single seat armchair (right) by Studio Henk. Booth 1827. Photography by Studio Henk.

 

The finishes of every piece offered by Studio Henk are fully customizable. The functional aesthetic of the Co lounge chair epitomizes modernism and, every detail, from the Kvadrat upholstery to the stain of the wood accents, can be changed to fit the mood of the space it’ll go into.

SkLO

Balance pendant by SkLO. Booth 957. Photography courtesy of SkLO.

 

The Balance pendant is emblematic of SkLO‘s emphasis on beauty and originality. The pendant’s soft curve and inherent asymmetry creates visual interest.

Read more: 2019 NYCxDESIGN Full Coverage 

Continue reading Preview the Standout Designs at ICFF 2019

Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

Industrial design students from Pratt paired with The American Hardwood Information Center for their Red Oak Reimagined exhibition. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

 

Yet another reason to journey across the river to the design-centric borough: WantedDesign Brooklyn 2019 has landed at creative hub Industry City and runs through Monday, May 20th. Downstairs you can preview the works of next-generation designers, with student contributions from as near as Pratt (industrial design students paired with The American Hardwood Information Center for their Red Oak Reimagined exhibition) and as far as Universidad Don Bosco, El Salvador and beyond.

Architecture-trained and Caracas, Venezuela-native Rodolfo Agrella designed his Ara lighting collection in collaboration with French brand Procédés Chénel. Photography courtesy of Rodolfo Agrella.

 

Upstairs, Rodolfo Agrella’s playful lighting installation features his unexpectedly fire-resistant and water-repellant Ara paper fixtures produced in collaboration with French brand Procédés Chénel.

California-based designer Elyse Graham traveled to France to craft glassware objects reminiscent of her original resin designs. Photography courtesy of Elyse Graham.

 

Designer Elyse Graham traded her preferred resin material for glass during a week-long residency at CIAV in Meisanthal, France as part of a transatlantic creative exchange. The resulting forms exult in changing colors of glass and applied pattern.

Read more: Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign

California-based designer Elyse Graham traveled to France to craft glassware objects reminiscent of her original resin designs. Photography courtesy of Elyse Graham.

With 165 years of glassmaking experience, the Corning Museum of Glass GlassLab provided fodder for Nice-born designer Philippe Nigroto produce colorful objects in just five days, including sculptural totems and playful containers in the age-old material.

French designer Philippe Nigro worked in conjunction with Corning Glass Lab to produce colorful totems and objets. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

 

IC Locals: Timber!, a collection of works by Industry City-based designers and makers curated by Hannah Martin, shows the endless uses for the building-block material, including an organic form crafted via steam-bending by Matthias Pliessnig. While onsite, indulge in the many food venues and relax in generous outdoor spaces.

A sinuous structure in wood by Matthias Pliessnig weaves its way through Hannah Martin’s IC Locals: Timber! Grouping. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign Brooklyn.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN

Continue reading Highlights from WantedDesign Brooklyn

What Caught Our Eye at ICFF 2019: Pops of Orange and Curvy Shapes

Arched and rounded furniture at Phase Design

One color dominated this year’s International Contemporary Furniture Fair: Orange, in its many variations.

It’s visible in chairs, tables, carpets, shelving units and wallpaper. There were booth dividers that utilized the color to great effect; even the carpet at the entrance to the event utilized the color.

ICFF

Dizzying in scope — there are more than 900 exhibitors across four days, located within the massive Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan — ICFF is one of the year’s biggest design events and the anchor of New York Design Week. Vendors come from all over the world to show their latest designs for furniture, hardware, plumbing, rugs and wallpaper.

Aside from shades of orange, another detail we noticed at ICFF this year: curves, in everything from furniture to lighting and accessories.

The wackier the better. We had a chance to sit in these chairs designed by Mojow, which used inflatable air-filled cushions on simple, modern frames of both wood and metal. They were sturdier and more comfortable than you’d imagine.

floquem

Along the same lines were these felt busts from Floquem, a brand from Mexico. The one above is called ‘Lil Marc,” who was “born and raised in the streets of Brooklyn.”

envy lee parker

One of our favorites at the show was the work of Eny Lee Parker, who works out of a studio in Bushwick. On display were tables, chairs and lights she designed that look like irregularly-shaped Ken Price sculptures that had been modified into playful furniture. The ceramic bases are unglazed, which gives them a rough edge.

souda

souda

Bushwick-based Souda made deconstructed furniture that nodded toward both tradition and progression. Pictured above are a pair of the Bluff Side Chairs, designed by Luft Tanaka.

sun at six

Sun at Six, a design studio located “on the border of Bed Stuy and Crown Heights,” according to Creative Director Antares Yee, uses classical Chinese joinery in their furniture. On display was the studio’s second collection, made in collaboration with artisans in Guangzhou, China.

grow house grow

Williamsburg-based designer Katie Deedy of Grow House Grow showed us some of their new tile and wallpaper designs. Inspired by Caravaggio and lightning bugs — among other influences — they feature ribbon-like patterns, florals, leaves and a strawberry print.

most modest

More orange could be found at Most Modest’s booth, which showed metal shelves and corrugated metal planters.

Ssen Studio

The fair had specialized sections dedicated to Dutch, Spanish and British designers. Some of our other favorites included sleek faucets and handles in many different finishes from longtime East New York maker Watermark, the handwoven pillows of Ssen Studio and sleekly minimal shelves from the Stille collection, designed by Standard Issue in Brooklyn and manufactured in Kalamazoo, Mich.

ssen studio

bend goods

watermark

flavor paper

opiary

stille

Kast Concrete Basins

and light

wool

molo

flavor paper

[Photos by Susan De Vries unless otherwise noted]

Related Stories

Email tips@brownstoner.com with further comments, questions or tips. Follow Brownstoner on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

Continue reading What Caught Our Eye at ICFF 2019: Pops of Orange and Curvy Shapes

Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign 2019

With WantedDesign 2019about to get underway in two distinct venues—Wanted Brooklyn at Industry City (May 16-20) and Wanted Manhattan at Terminal Stores (May 18-21)—we asked co-founders Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat about the fair’s theme, its new student design awards, and the second year of its bespoke Look Book at the Manhattan edition. The duo, both born in France, worked in the design and art fields before founding WantedDesign in 2011 to coincide with ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in New York. The event is now an integral part of the annual NYCxDESIGN calendar.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

Interior Design: How would you describe the 2019 theme of “Conscious Design” in the context of the Manhattan and Brooklyn editions of WantedDesign?

Odile Hainaut and Claire Pijoulat: In 2018, “Conscious Design” was defined as a leading theme to present sustainable projects that foresee what the future can be, if supported by creative vision and smart decisions. In 2019, the notion of conscious design will be encouraged and more widely highlighted in the WantedDesign programming as it is an urgent and essential matter. Protecting the environment, achieving reasonable consumption, and reducing waste are all issues that designers face on their daily tasks to create our homes and our work spaces, in addition to bringing beauty to healthier living.

Facing climate change, evaluating the impact we have on our planet and on civilization itself, falls now more than ever under the scope of responsibilities of all designers and creatives at large. As event organizers, we have the opportunity to have a voice; these are issues that we want to address specifically and that we implement in the way we build the show itself in encouraging our exhibitors to embrace a zero-waste approach when producing their installation. Last year we were able to reduce our waste by 50 percent, and in 2019 our policy is the first item in the contract we send to our exhibitors. 

The 2019 edition will challenge design professionals with original exhibits and showcases in order to forge their inspiration when drawing our future. Both destinations, Manhattan and Brooklyn, will include numerous educational (and fun) activities such as workshops, demos, and talks for the visitors and participants to connect, share, learn, and discover what should come next.

WantedDesign Brooklyn will take place at Industry City. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

ID: What can student designers attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: WantedDesign Brooklyn will have the Factory Floor dedicated to the Schools exhibit, with 30 schools coming from all over the world (France, China, Mexico, El Salvador, England, the United States, etc.). Now this show is becoming a not-to-be-missed destination to discover young talent. For the students, it’s a stepping stone to build up their professional network, which we know is essential.

Students will benefit directly from our ever-growing number of visitors, including design professionals and manufacturers. This year, for the first time, we have organized a jury to award the best design-student projects. It’s a way to highlight and support them even more. The jury will be led by Avinash Rajagopal, editor in chief of Metropolis, and includes Ayse Birsel, co-founder of Birsel + Seck; Andrea Lipps, assistant curator of contemporary design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; and Jonsara Ruth, co-founder and design director of Healthy Materials Lab at Parsons School of Design.

Five Awards will be given to the following: Best Original Concept and Design, Best Sustainable Solution, Best Project with Social Impact, Best Ready-to-be-Implemented-or-Produced (Project or Product), and Best Conscious Design Project (that unites three of the four previous criteria). Those five students will benefit from special promotion, and this review is a chance to show their project to professionals who can help with constructive criticism and a real eye for design.

We are also hosting various activities and programming that will be learning experiences for the students. For schools, we are really building opportunities of exchange and partnerships, which is essential.

Lastly, we are partnering again with AIGANY to host the 3rd Spring Wanted Job Fair. It’s a “speed dating” format, not portfolio review, offering a chance for young designers to meet with creative firms.

WantedDesign Manhattan will take place at Terminal Stores. Photography courtesy of WantedDesign.

ID: What can members of the trade attending WantedDesign this year expect to gain from the different programming of the Brooklyn and Manhattan editions?

OH and CP: In Manhattan, we always have a great presence of group exhibits from all over the world. This is really a unique feature of our show. This is how we share original design, new ideas, new material, new potential collaborations. Visitors will meet with Polish, Egyptian—for the first time in the U.S., and it’s a large group of 13 designers—Canadian, Mexican, and Colombian designers.

It’s also the second year of Look Book, a program dedicated to the promotion of the best high-end designers and makers in North America. This section of the show targets interior designers and architects who are looking for talented designers/makers with unique know-how to create bespoke pieces.

In the Launch Pad program, visitors will discover a large selection of 33 international designers, in two categories, furniture and lighting, who have a product ready to be launched in the U.S. market and are looking for the right partner to do it.

Wanted Interiors will explore the Future of Water/Bathroom 2025, a research project resulting from a collaboration between a team from Pratt Accelerator and the American Standard creative team, which is sponsoring this program. It involves how to change behaviors when using water, new scenarios and new ways to build bathroom for a sustainable urban living.

Last but not least, our talk series presented by DesignMilk and Clever is also a great focus for people who want to use WantedDesign as a resource and networking platform.

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN

Continue reading Preview the Manhattan and Brooklyn Editions of WantedDesign 2019

New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

With NYCxDESIGN and Brooklyn Designs at the Brooklyn Navy Yards about to get underway, we’ve rounded up the most recent projects in New York City’s buzziest borough, including warm cafés and reading rooms, fresh offices, and light-filled apartments.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

1. The Center for Fiction by BKSK Architects Brings Books and Sustainability to Brooklyn

The Center for Fiction started out as the Mercantile Library in 1821 and moved locations throughout Manhattan over the years. In 2008, it was rebranded, and more than 10 years later, the Center has a permanent home in a new downtown Brooklyn building by BKSK Architects with sustainability in mind. Read more about the bookstore/library/café

2. StudiosC Creates Positive/Negative Volumes for L&R Distributors in Brooklyn

L&R distributes more cosmetics than any other American company—25 brands and 8,000 SKUs in all. Its new corporate headquarters in Brooklyn’s Industry City circulates something else: a wide variety of staff, each with their own spatial needs, within what StudiosC principal Stephen Conte calls “an industrial blank canvas.” Read more about the office

3. Gensler Fashions a New Brooklyn Showroom for Lafayette 148

Brooklyn’s Navy Yard is among the most fashionable new areas in the borough, but until Lafayette 148 decided to leave its seven-floor SoHo digs and venture across the water, there wasn’t a fashion brand that called the historic concrete warehouse home. Gensler made sure the 68,000-square-foot headquarters, comprised of 15 different departments and large community work cafes, was as rousing as the exterior landscapes. Read more about the showroom

4. Idan Naor Thinks Horizontally for a Brooklyn Brownstone

The archetypical Brooklyn brownstone is a study in verticality, with a few stories of narrow corridors and dark rooms piled atop each other. However, when the local Idan Naor Workshop got the chance to reprogram a gem from the 1920s into a 5-unit apartment building, they decided on a different direction: horizontal. This 2,350-square-foot apartment jettisons the piles of hallways and instead utilizes a gallery to connect public areas to the three bedrooms, while ample natural light floods the expansive open plan. Read more about the brownstone

5. Five Retail Wonderlands Subvert Reality

This retail environment at Gray Matters brings customers into a product-inspired wonderland. Riffing on the brand’s Mildred Egg mule, Bower Studios chose table bases that are ovoids of painted resin composite. See all five stores

6. The Wing Brings Custom-Designed Mother’s Rooms to Brooklyn Office Buildings

When thinking of comfortable and relaxing spaces for a mother to pump or otherwise care for an infant, the office is likely ranked dead last. Audrey Gelman and Lauren Kassan, cofounders of the women’s co-working space, The Wing, want to change that. Gelman and Kassan have mobilized The Wing’s internal design team to bring secure, private spaces for working moms into the close-knit community of offices in DUMBO, starting with office buildings under Two Trees Management. Read more about the rooms

7. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Brews Up a Stumptown Café in a Brooklyn Firehouse

New York relies on coffee shops almost as much as municipal services. Now the two are merging—architecturally, at least—thanks to Stumptown Coffee Roasters’ first Brooklyn café, housed in an 1860’s former firehouse in leafy Cobble Hill. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design re-envisioned, along with the help of Structure NYC, the 1,875-square-foot space, most recently an indoor archery studio. Read more about the café

8. Coliving Goes Grand at a Restored Clinton Hill Mansion

A 6,200-square-foot row house on Grand Street in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn is the newest of Common’s coliving spaces. Built in 1901, Common restored the five-floor home to function for 23 people. Rather than keeping with the two-family tradition, Common densified the historic mansion in order to make the most of the much-desired square footage that Brooklyn has to offer. Read more about the house

9. LOT Office for Architecture Designs Oasis-Like Digs for Devoción in Downtown Brooklyn

When Devoción‘s first location opened in Williamsburg, Brooklynites delighted at the roastery’s oasis-like design and authentic Colombian brews. The beloved coffeehouse has returned for round two with a 1,700-square-foot space near the borough’s bustling downtown corridor. Greek-American firm LOT Office for Architecture spearheaded interiors that honor local traditions and mother nature in equal measure. Read more about the café

10. Inside Ample Hills Creamery’s Brand-New Exhibition Space in Brooklyn

As if the ice cream wasn’t draw enough. Jackie Cuscuna and Brian Smith, founders of Ample Hills Creamery, have just opened the largest ice-cream factory in all of New York City—and have included an interactive museum, like a cherry on top. A brick building, part of the former Beard Street Warehouses complex in Red Hook, contains 12,500 square feet of production space, plus 2,000 more for exhibits, party areas, and of course a retail shop by Danielle Galland Interior Design. Read more about the factory

Continue reading New in Brooklyn: 10 Hip Coffee Shops, Offices, Apartments, and More

%d bloggers like this: