Tag Archives: Bricks

LEGO Tape Lets You Turn Anything Into Lego-Compatible Surface, Here’s How It Works

Lego is quite possibly the best toy ever invented, but even those amazing plastic building blocks have their limits. For example, you can only use them on a flat surface or a Lego board, but soon you’ll be able to stick your bricks wherever you want thanks to this versatile tape by Nimuno.

It’s flexible, it’s cuttable, and it comes with an adhesive backing so you can attach it to walls, other toys, and even yourself if you want! It also allows you to make curvy shapes such as hills, rivers, and roads, and the best part is that it’s actually surprisingly cheap. Two rolls will cost you just $11, while $50 will get you 10. The project is being funded on Indiegogo, where eager Lego enthusiasts soon helped it to surpass its original funding goal of $8,000 (so far almost 11,000 backers have pledged close to $400,000!), so if you want to get your hands on a roll then they’re available for pre-order now.

More info: indiegogo (h/t)

If you’re getting this, just make sure you wear protection. Like these anti-LEGO slippers.

Continue reading LEGO Tape Lets You Turn Anything Into Lego-Compatible Surface, Here’s How It Works

Advertisements

Is Contemporary Industrial Architecture Taking Over In Housing?

What Is Industrial Housing?

For those of you who are not quite sure what it means when someone uses the term “industrial architecture,” the term refers to a style of architecture that features, minimal surface decoration, industrial materials, clean lines, flat roofs, jutting edges, and polished surfaces. The style has increased in popularity over the last several decades. Today, the minimal style is embraced by those who choose to live life in busy industrial centers and away from suburban communities. For many, the style’s tendency to use greener materials and modern designs are its many attractors. Because of these reasons and many more, Industrial Architecture is “in” and in a big way.

Industrial Design Is Good For Communities

With the decline in manufacturing, cities and urban areas are ripe with opportunities for new development. Using existing industrial infrastructures, many imaginative architects have been able to transform and preserve the existing industrials spaces. Once an area’s industrial buildings and spaces of old have been transformed into new housing, businesses, and other rich spaces, the community is given a new life. What was once a blighted area with abandoned manufacturing spaces can now be turned into sites that benefit and regenerate the community. This urban revitalization is becoming more and more common in cities everywhere.

Industrials spaces can easily be converted into cost-effective residential housing. Leaving exposed I-beams, ventilation, pipes, bricks, and concrete is less costly than covering the features with drywall. The utilitarian and minimal look is attractive in its own way and is especially popular with a younger generation.

Features And Innovation In Industrial Design

Open Spaces – Industrial architecture and design are increasing in popularity in private residential homes. Industrial spaces are sought after for their open interiors, high ceilings, and access to natural light. Skylights and large windows provide the interiors with abundant light as the high ceilings and open rooms further push the style’s expansive nature. Often, industrial interiors have fewer walls. The large, open rooms allow inhabitants to more flexibly, creatively, and effectively use the space.

Dividers – Large industrial spaces are able to be easily portioned into smaller areas with the use of dividers. The simple, cost-effective solution reduces the expense of a costly remodel and allows a large space to accommodate multiple functions. The use of dividers or movable walls allows the home to organically accommodate the growing and changing needs of the residents who live within its walls.

Garage Doors – Large industrial doors and garage doors can be easily integrated features within an industrial design. Large automatic doors open up the interior of a home and allow it to extend into an outer space. Indoor/ outdoor living areas are popular features of homes with industrial, minimal, and modern designs.

Green Housing – One industrial architectures most apparent benefits is its reduction in waste and easy conversion to green housing. Many of the industrial spaces used for the basis of these homes are located in urban centers and offer great walk-ability, public transportation, or bike access. Additionally, many of the building materials used in the development are recycled or up-cycled from the previous space, making this one of the greenest architectural styles.

Not Just For the City Any More

Industrial architecture is one of the most popular residential styles in the cities throughout the world. However, the style has become so popular that it is infiltrating other interior design as well as residential suburban architecture.

If you’re interested in living in space with a distinctive industrial style, but do not like city life, then you still may be able to find your perfect industrial style loft in a less urban space. Many buildings and homes in smaller towns and suburbs boast industrial style spaces. These spaces are often old factories and manufacturing plants. However, the historic charm can add to the beauty of the home’s interior. However, industrial style spaces in smaller cities, towns, and suburbs do need to take care that their space remains anchored in the character of the region where it is located.

Source: rjgaragedoors.com.au

Continue reading Is Contemporary Industrial Architecture Taking Over In Housing?

Living in a cloud: What nanotech means for architecture and the built environment

Could there come a time when buildings will become less about bricks and mortar and feel more like mists or fogs?

JULY 02, 2019 |

Last month, I wrote about how automation and AI are dramatically changing all four fundamental relationships between buildings and machines. For example, nanotechnology, which manipulates individual atoms and molecules to assemble things, could make the modernist metaphor of a “machine for living in” into reality, since the building would actually be composed of many tiny machines.

In fact, that’s not quite accurate. The definition of “machine” is “an apparatus using or applying mechanical power and having several parts, each with a definite function and together performing a particular task.” 

So machines are made of distinct parts, cobbled together to fulfill a function. They are characterized by their composition, as assemblages of singular bits and pieces in which the whole is greater than the sum.

 

SEE ALSO: Assessing AI’s impact on the AEC profession and the built environment

 

But nanotech will completely change this. When entire buildings can be shaped from microscopic components, the visible distinction between the individual parts will evaporate. A structure built from invisible machines will not appear to be a machine at all, since it no longer will be perceived as an assembly of parts. An edifice made of congealed cybernetic butter will look to be all whole, no parts. The very concept of a “building” could become meaningless, since it will no longer be “built” in any traditional way. 

Remember “Terminator 2”? Arnold Schwarzenegger’s T-800 is a machine: steel and servos wrapped in human skin. Robert Patrick’s T-1000 is made of liquid metal (“mimetic polyalloy”). He’s like sentient mercury, morphing into any shape he needs. A nanotech building (“nanotecture”?) would make conventional structures seem like Robby the Robot (of “Forbidden Planet” fame).

Buttery buildings could change everything we think and know about architecture. Frank Lloyd Wright felt that architectural form should stem from the inherent “nature” of its materials: “Each material speaks a language of its own.” In his mind, the proportions, heft, and texture of brick logically translated into structures such as the Robie House, which extends horizontally and hugs the land. But when the constituent parts of a building are too small to be seen with the naked eye, the relationships between form and materials will change. What is the “language” of a nanobot?

Because the character of a building could vary upon command—hard and opaque one minute, soft and transparent the next—the fabric of buildings could become fluid, fluctuating states from solid to liquid to gas and back. The notion of truth in materials will become irrelevant. In fact, the word material could go away. When the basic building blocks of architecture have no strict definition, structure and substance could separate. Matter may not matter.

Could there come a time when buildings will become less about bricks and mortar and feel more like mists or fogs, vaguely enveloping space in ways we can barely picture now? What will it be like to live in a cloud?

Lance Hosey, FAIA, LEED Fellow, is a Design Director with Gensler. His book, The Shape of Green: Aesthetics, Ecology, and Design, has been an Amazon #1 bestseller in the Sustainability & Green Design category.

Continue reading Living in a cloud: What nanotech means for architecture and the built environment