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Tag Archives: Beverly Hills

Rottet Studio Makes Design the Star at the Los Angeles Office of Paradigm

PROJECT NAME Paradigm
LOCATION Los Angeles
FIRM Rottet Studio
SQ. FT. 82,000 SQF

“Light and movement.” That’s what Sam Gores said he wanted to see upon entering his office in Los Angeles. And when the chairman and CEO of Paradigm Talent Agencyasks for something, that is precisely what he gets—particularly when the project is designed by Rottet Studio. Interior Design Hall of Fame member Lauren Rottet’s firm is itself a fixture in the entertainment business, with credits including offices for United Talent Agency and Viacom.

A custom reception desk in folded and welded mirror-polished stainless-steel stands on engineered European white-oak floor planks at Rottet Studio’s Los Angeles office for Paradigm Talent Agency. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

A powerhouse with eight locations across the U.S. as well as in Toronto and London, Paradigm “understood that architecture does matter,” Rottet Studio founding principal Richard Riveire begins. “They really get that an agency can leapfrog over competitors by bringing everyone under one roof, giving them a great place to work, and making sure that conversations and impromptu meetings happen.” So, employees from the music, literary, film, and TV divisions, previously at three separate L.A. sites, are now together in Beverly Hills.

Milo Baughman–inspired chairs face a leather-covered sofa in the green room. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Notable for a landmark fountain, a monumental pyramid, standing in the front courtyard, the 1980s building had a storied past as the former home of the agency ICM Partners but had been vacant for seven years. Though Riveire and principal Harout Dedeyan term their intervention there “tenant improvement,” that’s just Rottet Studio’s typically understated manner. We call the project a complete gut job, with only the limestone and granite wall cladding and the skylight retained. The 82,000-square-foot U-shape interior was entirely rebuilt. Plus, the courtyard, which previously “leaked like a sieve,” Riveire says, was repaved and replanted around the pyramid.

Rising from reception’s sitting area, stairs offer additional seating on vinyl-covered cushions. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

The greatest challenge was “to figure out new ways of working inside a 30-year-old building,” Riveire continues. “By jamming things together, we could create an exciting design that changes all the time.” The device that “moved the throttle setting toward more common spaces,” he explains, was the insertion of a central stair atrium—obviously the big move. “We had to whack out 1,000 square feet on two of the floors.” 

A Greg Bogin artwork was commissioned for a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

No mere grand staircase, this. It’s not only the people connector between the three levels but also a multitasker. The lower, wider flight can serve as a vertical space for solo work, thanks to the  blocky cushions scattered across the steps, or as a venue for all-hands company meetings, when combined with the reception area and an adjacent conference room.

On three, the reception area features an armless chair by Karim Rashid. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Flights aren’t stacked but slightly rotated inside circular openings that differ in size—difficult to engineer, to say the least. “LED halos accentuate the perimeters,” Dedeyan says. The ensemble presents quite a climb, especially for those with vertigo. A mirrored ceiling produces a dizzying kaleidoscope effect, making the height appear as six stories, not three.

The courtyard’s new granite, concrete, and turf surfaces surround an existing Eric Orr pyramid fountain. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Sharing dramatic creds is the reception desk. Riveire, who’s highly knowledgeable about hospitality projects, too, compares it to “the front desk of a hotel.” He goes on to liken the long, purposely low form in mirror-polished stainless steel to “a squished pickle.” We see inspirations of sculptures by Anish Kapoor. Regardless, it’s an Instagram moment.

Erik Parker’s acrylic collage on canvas punctuates a corridor. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Speaking of art, there’s no shortage of spectacular pieces, some of them commissioned. Initiated by Gores, the program was assembled by a DJ-curator, DB Burkeman, in collaboration with a more conventional art consultant. Standouts include the atrium’s colorful text-based screen prints, kinetic black-and-white photographs of figures in the elevator lobbies, and a corridor’s collage inspired by comic books, hip-hop, and graffiti.

Nylon carpet in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Surprisingly, knowing Rottet Studio as we do, furnishings are generally not custom. Widely available residential pieces, they could be found in many a stylish living room. Flooring, consistent with that vibe, is white-oak planks in common spaces. “The wood is a contrast to all that stone on the walls,” Riveire explains.

The listening room is acoustically isolated. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Carpeted work spaces follow the customary setup. Glass-fronted private offices for agents face assistants at a benching system. Most offices have sit-stand desks. (Many in the stand position during our visit.) Sprinkled among the offices are casual lounges, up for grabs as needed. What’s unusual is the lack of hierarchy among divisions. No single one ranks above any other.

The stair atrium’s mirror-finished stretched mem­brane ceiling reflects a series of 21 screen prints by Eve Fowler. Photography by Eric Laignel.

 

Conference and meeting rooms and the “signing rooms” encircle the stair atrium. Really, though, everything is an ad hoc meeting space, including  elevator lobbies fitted out with chic and super-comfy seating. There are also pantries and coffee bars aplenty, the best, no doubt, being the ground level’s coffee lounge opening onto the courtyard. Pull up a stool to the marble counter, or plop down on a sofa or armchairs anchored by a houndstooth rug that blends with the same pattern rendered in floor tile.

Reception’s custom wool-silk rug. Photography by Eric Laignel.

The list of amenities goes on: a screening room with adjacent green room, another room filled with candy. According to Paradigm director of special services and guest relations Rozzana Ramos, clients come just to hang out. Linger long enough, and you might spot Antonio Banderas or Henry Golding reading a script or Chris Martin, Ed Sheeren, or Sia headed to the listening room where, Riveire says, they can “crank it up to 11.” 

Keep scrolling to view more images of the project >

LED halos ringing the stair atrium. Photography by Eric Laignel.
A corridor’s con­struction of album covers with wood and resin by David Ellis. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lounge on two. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Patricia Urquiola chairs appear in a private office. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Damien Hirst’s deck for Supreme is mounted with other skateboards in an office area. Photography by Eric Laignel.
In the coffee lounge, a focal wall includes artwork by Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha. Photography by Eric Laignel.
Laser-printed photographs by Kenton Parker energize an elevator lobby. Photography by Eric Laignel.
The lacquered logo wall on a granite base. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Project Team: Chris Jones; Theresa Lee; Pegah Koulaeian, Laurence Cartledge: Rottet Studio. Esquared Lighting: Lighting Consultant. Newson Brown Acoustics: Acoustical Consultant. Cybola Systems Corporation: Audio-Visual Consultant. Lendrum Fine Art: Art Consultant. Thornton Tomasetti: Structural Engineer. Arc Engineering: MEP. AMA Project Management: Project Manager. Clune Con­struc­tion Company: General Contractor.

Product Sources: From Front: AM Cabinets: Custom Desk (Recep­tion). Palecek: Coffee Table (Green Room). RH: Chairs, Sofa (Green Room), Sofa (Listening Room). CB2: Console (Green Room), Side Tables (Hall), Sofa, Coffee Table (Lounge), Table (Office), Dining Chairs (Coffee Lounge). Tai Ping Carpets: Custom Rug (Sitting Area). Davis Furniture: Sofas. Holly Hunt: Chairs. West Elm: Side Tables (Lounge, Coffee Lounge, Reception Area). Martin Brattrud: Cushions (Stairway). Blu Dot: Benches (Hall), Stools (Atrium), Credenza (Listening Room), Sofa (Reception Area). Summer Classics: Chairs (Court­Yard). Andreu World: Chairs (Office). Alur: Storefront Sys­tem. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams: Coffee Table (Coffee Lounge). Gus Modern: Sofa. Shaw Hospitality: Rug. Andreu World: Barstools. Thomas O’Brien: Pendant Fixture. Zuo Modern: Chairs (Coffee Lounge), Chairs, Table (Listening Room). Tandus: Rug (Reception Area). Nienkamper: Chair. H.D. Buttercup: Armchairs. West Elm: White Side Table. Bernhardt Design: Bench. Throughout: Monarch Plank: Floor Planks. Bentley: Carpet. Barrisol: Stretched Ceiling Membrane. Benjamin Moore & Co.; Dunn-Edwards Corporation: Paint.

> See more from the May 2019 issue of Interior Design

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ACOUSTICS 101: WHY ARE RESTAURANT ACOUSTICS DIFFERENT?

For more than 20 years many restaurateurs have asked their interior designers to “make it sound like there’s 100 people eating when there’s only a table of four dining.” This was intended to make people think it’s a great restaurant because it sounded like there were a lot of people eating there.  However, when it has 100 actually in-house, it sounds like 2,500 people. Now the full restaurant is unnaturally loud by design, acoustically resembling a rock concert rather than a nice place to have a great meal and good conversation. 

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The 15 Most Expensive Zip Code In The United States

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11962: Bridgehampton, New York

This nine-bedroom home, which sits on 20 acres and is reportedly owned by Christie Brinkley, is being offered for $29.5 million. (The market for luxury Hamptons real estate is so strong that last week Zillow Group launched Out East, a website devoted to the region with listings and town guides.)

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94027: Atherton, California

The suburb is the most expensive place to live in Silicon Valley. Here’s what $17.5 million will get you there (spoiler alert: five bedrooms).

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90210: Beverly Hills, California

This $70-million estate includes a 20,000-square-foot main house, a 7,000-square-foot guest house, stables, riding rings, and a tennis court.

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33109: Fisher Island, Florida

Located three miles offshore from Miami, Fisher Island was once the private home of William K. Vanderbilt. In the 2000 census, it had the highest per-capita income in the United States.

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94301: Palo Alto, California

An empty lot on less than 3/10 of an acre? That’ll be $5.4 million.

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11976: Water Mill, New York

A 42-acre estate originally built for the Ford family could be yours for $175 million.

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94022: Palo Alto, California

94022 includes parts of Palo Alto and Los Altos including Westwind Community Barn, shown here.

94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

92067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

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94028: Portola Valley, California

“Portola Valley generally attracts the affluent of Silicon Valley who prefer open space, country living, expansive lots, and stunning views,” according to the locally based DeLeon Realty.

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90402: Los Angeles, California

This zip code incorates parts of Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

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94305: Stanford, California

Stanford University sits on some of the priciest land in the country.

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10013: New York City (Parts of Tribeca and Soho)

Move over, Upper East Side mansions. This downtown area is Manhattan’s priciest.

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90265: Malibu, California

The celebrity beachside hangout currently has five properties available from $50 million to $85 million.

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93108: Montecito, California

Fires and mudslides hit this Santa Barbara suburb in recent months; even Oprah Winfrey’s 65-acre estate was damaged.

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2067: Rancho Santa Fe, California

A suburb of San Diego, Rancho Santa Fe is home to a 23,500-square-foot estate listed for $44.975 million. (The seller “will entertain offers between $39,900,000 [and] $44,975,000” though.)

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11930: Amagansett, New York

Rounding out the list is another Hamptons hamlet. Located between East Hampton and Montauk, low-key Amagansett has been home to celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, and Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick.

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THE CLINTON RESIDENCE BEVERLY HILLS

The house is set high up in the Beverly Hills: the Clinton Residence. It was designed in 1973 by the architect Amir Farr and was recently addressed by one of the new stars in the interior design firmament: Maxime Jacquet. The house affords its occupants a spectacular view over Los Angeles to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. The estate represents the optimum combination of city living and countryside pleasures. Maxime chose to accentuate the engagement with nature using earth tones throughout the interior.

The Beverly Hills area is studded with houses designed by famous architects. Richard Neutra, Hal Levitt, Gordon Kaufmann, Wallace Neff, J.Martyn Haenke, Paul Williams and Craig Ellwood are a few who, especially in the first half of the 20th century, ventured to give free rein to their creative imagination here. They were encouraged to do so by their clients – many of whom were creative themselves and were keen on innovative architecture. Architect Amir Farr design this house in the early 1970s. He was a colleague of Oscar Niemeyer, the famous architect who designed the city of Brasilia and was co-architect of the United Nations complex in New York City.

Maxime Jacquet was recently asked to modernise the house designed by Farr. He has created a comfortable, opulent ensemble filled with large artworks. But he has addressed the grandeur of the original architecture with fitting respect. The designer: “When I restored this house I sought to return everything to the way it was to start with, respecting the original design as far as possible. It’s a splendid piece of architecture that we have adapted to the present day. The interventions were chiefly cosmetic: the introduction of large window walls to create a luxurious feeling. The relocation of the swimming pool was more drastic. In the original design it was closer to the house and in fact beneath a large roof overhang. I shifted the pool more towards the edge of the plot which has resulted in an unimpeded view. The pool deck is made of teak.”

The house has a floor area of around 740 m2 and has five bedrooms and five bathrooms. The ground floor is designed as one vast space containing the living and dining areas. The gourmet kitchen has been closed off from the television room. The first floor houses a game room and an office in open plan. Maxime has made sophisticated use of wood, glass and stone in the interior which creates a harmonious ambience. The different spaces flow together and the interaction between interior and exterior is also enhanced in this way. “When you see the house for the first time, you’re struck by the scale and the openness. That openness continues into the interior, with the large living area forming the hub of the house. The high ceiling actually soars into the big roof. Large window walls access the pool deck and garden, emphasising the entertainment aspect.

Also, there is plenty of natural light which serves the owners’ extensive art collection well. I designed the interior to be consistent with the architecture and, as far as possible, attuned the finishes to the original design. Now the overall effect is classical-modern: vintage with comfort and timeless elegance prevailing. We have enhanced the ‘Californian feel’ by avoiding cold materials and opting for quality cottons in the soft furnishings. The result is a perfect balance between tradition and modernity, between luxury and severity, and between fashion and comfort.”

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The 12 Most Over-the-Top Transportation Designs of 2017

Apartments along New York’s Park Avenue, mansions in Beverly Hills, and beachfront property in Miami—these are the areas where sky-high prices are not only warranted but expected, due in large part to their exclusivity and demand. But paying $40,000 for a bicycle? That’s an unbelievably enormous amount, especially when considering the fact that the average bike in America costs between $300 and $500. Yet, these types of over-the-top transportation designs seemed to sprout up every few months in 2017. From a private jet with a moonroof to a Rolls Royce superyacht, AD rounds up the 12 transportation designs that will hold your attention, both for their beauty as well as their price tag. Who knows: Maybe you’ll be the next Mega Millions lottery winner, and this list will instantly become a lot more relevant.

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