Advertisements

Tag Archives: benjamin moore

ASID Leadership Experience

  • Time Left:
  • 117days
    6hours
    16minutes
    27seconds
The Leadership Experience: Presented by ASID (EXP) is the ultimate event for design professionals of all levels, from seasoned professionals to rising stars. EXP puts the spotlight on you by focusing on the idea that when you are your best self, you can successfully lead others.
JULY 18-20, 2019
LOEWS ATLANTA | ATLANTA

Experience learning opportunities custom-tailored for your individual goals, whether they include Leading Yourself, Leading Your Team, or Leading Your Firm, taught by experienced faculty presenters. The Leadership Experience offers a unique opportunity to spark creativity, growth, and self-improvement.

REGISTER

OPENING KEYNOTE

FY18Minette_Norman-Home

SHANTELL MARTIN

ARTIST. INNOVATOR. CULTURAL FACILITATOR.

Walk Like an Artist
Curriculum ?

YOUR EXPERIENCE

ASID has disrupted the traditional conference format and has rethought how to best help you learn and advance in the profession. Discover Atlanta as you participate in experiential learning opportunities including curated design tours, health and wellness activities, and peer-to-peer networking events.

 

Highlights ?

REGISTER

 

SET YOURSELF APART
All EXP attendees will have the option to purchase a leadership skills assessment to tailor the EXP curriculum to your personal growth and needs. Knowing your leadership strengths will allow you to personalize your learning experience.

ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS
Understand the qualities, development, and courage it takes to achieve your goals, and gain the best set of professional tools to make it possible.

EXPAND YOUR NETWORK
EXP is the place for you to engage with peers, thought leaders, and industry experts while expanding your network and learning from others.

THE EXPERIENCE FACULTY

The EXP faculty includes a curated mix of design industry leaders and experts in an expanse of non-design related industries, allowing you to gain new perspectives on how to set and achieve your goals.

 

Committee
Tamie Glass, ASID
Interior Design Program Director
Committee
Tamie Glass, ASID
Interior Design Program Director

 

 

CURRICULUM

EXP incites development through a rich blend of programming and personal connections. Through thoughtful disruption of your daily routine and process, EXP is the ultimate platform for career and personal growth.

 

Curriculum ?

 
LEAD YOURSELF
Learn to be your own advocate, understand the ins and outs of the design industry, and set the groundwork for success as a person and an employee.

LEAD YOUR TEAM
Learn to nurture your employees, lead with forethought, and inspire those around you to perform their best work.

LEAD YOUR FIRM
Learn to think radically, expand your business thoughtfully, and stay true to your vision as a leader and designer.

LEAD YOUR CHAPTER
Exclusive for FY20 ASID Chapter Board Leaders: Learn to develop your chapter, make an impact on the local design community, and work in tandem with ASID HQ to provide the best possible outlet for professional education.

LOCATION

Originally founded as the terminating stop of a major railroad, Atlanta has grown to be the capital of Georgia and a city with a wealth of history. The city is a global leader in commerce, finance, research, technology, education, media, art, and entertainment, and the perfect backdrop of inspiration and innovation for EXP 2019.

 

Venue + Travel ?

 

THE EXPERIENCE SPONSORS 

sponsor-logo-grid-2

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The Leadership Experience is guided by the perspective and feedback from our volunteer committee. Want to get involved? Email events@asid.org to learn more.
Vivien Chen, Allied ASID
Interior Designer, HoK 

Amber Clore, ASID
Founder and CEO, A.Clore Interiors

Steve Hart, ASID, AIA, LEED AP
Principal, HLGstudio

Kelsey Kees, ASID, LEED AP
Senior Interior Designer, Young Office

  • When

  • July 18, 2019 – July 20, 2019
  • Add to CalendarAdd to Calendar
  • Where

  • Loews Atlanta
    1065 Peachtree St NE
    Atlanta, GA 30309
    USA

    @loewsatl

  • Presented By

  • ASID Events

    #ASIDEXP

  • Contact UsContact Us

Committee
Tamie Glass, ASID
Interior Design Program Director

h

F

Committee
Tamie Glass, ASID
Interior Design Program Director
b

Committee
Tamie Glass, ASID
Interior Design Program Director

Continue reading ASID Leadership Experience

Advertisements

ASID Gives Student Designers an Insider Look at the Industry at SCALE 2019

ASID Gives Student Designers an Insider Look at the Industry at SCALE 2019

The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) held its National Student Summit over the weekend in New York City. Students and educators alike dedicated their weekend to three days of programming that kicked off Friday morning and concluded with a closing keynote led by none other than Interior Design editor-in-chief Cindy Allen.

The Summit, like ASID, champions the ability of design to impact lives. For students, this manifests in the Summit’s mission to prepare them for their first professional roles in the design industry, while educators are briefed on timely and relevant topics to explore in their curricula. It’s no wonder that the Summit sold out, with over 400 students in attendance at the Grand Hyatt New York. 

Enter the NYCxDESIGN Awards by April 5

Students spent Friday morning embarking on their choice of firm and showroom tours; participating firms included major industry players such as: HOKICRAVE, Rockwell Group, Perkins Eastman, A+I, Perkins+Will, NBBJIA, and Interior Design parent company SANDOW. Students also had the option to tour showrooms that included Haworth, Benjamin Moore, Herman MillerTeknionTOTO, and Gunlocke.

Photography by Griffin Shapiro.

Attendees reconvened in the afternoon for a keynote address on the business of design led by ASID CEO Randy W. Fiser. Fiser cultivated a discussion between Benjamin Moore color and design expert Andrea Magno, ICRAVE executive team leader David Taglione, HDR design and brand strategy principal Elizabeth Von Lehe, and Studio O+A design director Mindi Weichman. Together they discussed what each looks for when hiring and recruiting talent, and in turn gave students advice on acing interviews, putting together a stellar portfolio, navigating internships, and finding their true passion in design.

For the remainder of the day, students had their pick of breakout seminars, the ASID National Student Career Fair, and networking time in the SCALE Learning Lounge before the evening’s opening reception at the Humanscale showroom.

Following breakfast on Saturday, attendees began their day at a morning keynote speech from ASID national chair BJ Miller. Miller, who is also founder and principal of the Vision Group and managing director of Indigo Companies, shared her path to becoming a leader in the design industry. Miller advised students on what it takes to develop the path towards leadership regardless of differences in career aspirations. She highlighted the importance of respect for the work and one’s self, along with a desire to win and diligence in cultivating strengths.

Photography by Griffin Shapiro.

After Miller’s morning keynote, students embarked on tours of notable projects that have been recently completed in the New York City area. Locations for the morning tours included the Delos headquarters, Etsy headquarters, and STK Grace. Students then reconvened at the Hyatt for the afternoon keynote. 

Liz Ogbu, founder and principal of Studio O, spoke to the role of design and design professionals in spatial justice issues. She encouraged the up-and-coming designers to cultivate an awareness of social justice as it relates to geography and how designers can bring an awareness of racial justice as it relates to the built environment. Ogbu advocated a shift to doing right by others through design, and creating opportunities for others to move up rather than out.

Following Ogbu’s keynote, students set out on another round of project tours at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and American Copper. Evening pop-ups in the Learning Lounge focused on opportunities for professional development, while breakout sessions on the impact of design explored issues of social justice, the environment, and education. 

On the final day of programming, students and educators alike convened for breakout sessions exploring the practice of design. The conference concluded with a keynote conversation between George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg of Yabu Pushelberg, moderated by Interior Design editor-in-chief Cindy Allen.

For more from SCALE, check out the keynote conversation between Interior Design’s Editor in Chief Cindy Allen and George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg of Yabu Pushelberg.

ASID CEO Randy Fiser. Photography by Interior Design Staff.
Photography by Griffin Shapiro.
Photography by Griffin Shapiro.

Continue reading ASID Gives Student Designers an Insider Look at the Industry at SCALE 2019

It’s All There in Black and White

Photo from Fabric.com

As an interior designer, I’m constantly being asked to write about what the current design trends are. “Trend” meaning what’s popular right now, what people are drawn to – just like fashion, I suppose. Trends come and go, and I’d like to forget a lot of them from years gone by, like Tuscan design. Or in the fashion sense, gaucho pants.

But trends are important. It’s how we run our businesses, based on current styles and preferences. Where do they come from? What starts a new trend? In my opinion, I believe it’s all tied in with what’s going on in the outside world. For example, post-war 1950s was a time of relief, comfort and new beginnings. With that came bright, happy colors that conveyed the optimistic mood of the time (above).

I recently discovered that Benjamin Moore’s Color of the Year for 2016 is for all intents and purposes, not really a color. “Simply White” OC-117 is a creamy off-white tint. I won’t get in too deep as to the whys and wherefores of what this means, but given the chaos of the current world climate, it’s pretty obvious to me that we are seeking calm and needing a breath of fresh air (and neutrality) in our somewhat unsettling lives.

simplywhite_OC-117simplywhite_OC-117simplywhite_OC-117

Photo from Benjamin Moore

But isn’t an off-white color a little boring? Not necessarily. Using this soft neutral as a background and adding layers of texture and contrast, “Simply White” becomes anything but. As designers, it’s our job to take this everyday mundane color and bring it to another level. By adding layers of texture and graphic punch, this otherwise bland color becomes the background to a stunning design.

Simply White Interior

Photo from Benjamin Moore

Adding graphic contrast by using black patterns with white has been a trend in Europe for some time now. This great looking floor tile from MEROLA is a good example of how to add an up-to-date look to a classic black-and-white theme.

Photo from Merola Tile

Photo from Merola Tile

Even inexpensive subway tile can be used as a background for a great shelf detail in a kitchen. By using contrasting gray grout, adding graphic punch with brass shelf brackets and bringing in texture with simple black shelving can turn mundane into magnificent!

Photo from Rejuvenation.com

Photo from Rejuvenation.com

So I’m good with “Simply White” for now. Simple is good, and we could all use a little simplicity right now.

This entry was posted on Thursday, July 28th, 2016 at 9:20 AM and is filed under Bath Design, Creativity, Inspiration, Kitchen Design, Projects, Trends. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Comments are closed.

Continue reading It’s All There in Black and White

A guide to paint sheens, from glossy to matte

Yas sheen yas (but also, in some cases, no)

Sam Frost

So you’ve done the hard part—after much debate you’ve finally settled on a paint color. Now, the merchant wants to know what sheen you want and there are so many choices. We asked artist Mary McMurray to help us sift through the options.

For the past thirty years, Murray has run her own color consulting business, called Art First Colors for Architecture, in Portland, Oregon. Her unique perspective—she’s an artist and also became a licensed painting contractor in order to mix her own colors—makes her an authority on the medium. Here’s a cheat sheet for choosing the right paint sheens.

1. In general, there is a sheen scale

The first thing to know is that sheens typically exist on a scale, usually from flat (no shine) to glossy (ultra-shiny), with steps in between. According to McMurray, a loose sheen scale that accelerates in shine quality looks like this: flat > matte > eggshell > satin > semi-gloss > gloss or high-gloss.

handbook-widget

The sheen designations can be a little confusing at times because each paint manufacturer coins their own. For instance, at Benjamin Moore, satin is also referred to as Pearl. At Farrow & Ball, sheens are referred to as emulsions. In general, however, a scale will exist.

2. Shine tends to equal durability

The general rule for matching a paint sheen to the room is this: The higher the shine level of the paint, the more durable it will be. This means different sheens are appropriate to different areas of the home, depending on their activity level.

There can be exceptions to this, thanks to modern developments in paint formulation. For instance, Sherwin-Williams now makes a line of flat paint called Emerald that they advertise as having the same “washability and durability as the matte or glossier sheens.”

3. Low sheen for low traffic rooms

The lower end of the spectrum, that being the flat and matte sheens, are typically used for low-traffic rooms since the finish is susceptible to marks and stains that don’t easily wipe off. This makes these finishes good for places like adult bedrooms or home offices—as opposed to kid’s rooms where there is more activity.

When picking a flat sheen for a wall, McMurray suggests using the highest quality paint possible, as it will be more durable in the long run. “If you do happen to get a handprint on a flat-finished wall that you used a cheap paint on, and you try to wipe it off, it’s probably going to destroy the finish,” she says.

4. Higher sheen for high traffic or moisture-prone rooms

Since higher shine equals higher durability, use an eggshell, satin, or semi-gloss in the bathroom, kitchen, hallways, and kid’s rooms. This ensures that constant exposure to moisture doesn’t affect the finish and impromptu stains or scuffs can be cleaned off the walls easily with a sponge and cleaner.

In the bathroom and kitchen, make sure to extend the same sheen to the ceiling that’s being used on the walls. “In the kitchen, it depends on what kind of cooking you do and how much ventilation you have,” says McMurray. Some people might be able to do a matte finish in a kitchen but a safer bet would be eggshell or higher, for ease of wiping down splatters.

5. Highest sheen on trim and doors

Baseboards, doors, and trim are probably the hardest hit surfaces in your house. For that reason, opting for satin or semi-gloss will protect them. “For trimwork, I like satin or semi-gloss depending on what the project is,” says McMurray. The higher sheen will highlight the architectural features and allow them to contrast with the body of the wall surface nicely, while also surviving nicks and scrapes better.

Just be aware that higher sheen paints are thinner in consistency, and can be harder to work with and control for a smooth finish (depending on your painting skills, of course). For this reason, self-leveling paints, like Benjamin Moore’s Advance line, are extremely helpful. McMurray does not often specify a gloss or high-gloss finish, except for the occasional client who wants a standout front door.

6. Consider the overall effect in the room

In addition to selecting a sheen for its function, McMurray cautions people to also be aware of how it will look in a room. Consider the wall surface quality as well as the sheen’s overall effect. Lower sheen paints will soak up more light rather than reflecting it, which is good if there is imperfections in your wall surface that need to be hidden. Shinier paints will reflect light and draw attention to bumps and divots in drywall or plaster.

The latter can be “very distracting,” says McMurray. “I like flat finishes on the ceiling, partly because that doesn’t offer any distraction with light bouncing off the surface and it creates a calmer effect,” she says.

Noise amplification is also something to consider. “If you painted a whole room in semi-gloss, the light would feel very noisy,” says McMurray. “You would get a lot of glare reflected and it wouldn’t be a very calm and peaceful environment.” She has read studies wherein it was discovered that audible noise increases with the degrees of sheen.

7. For the exterior, go more matte

Exterior paint has a similar range of sheens, yet here McMurray cautions against painting your whole house satin, even if the logic is that the shinier finish will stand up better to the weather and elements. “Then your house looks kind-of like a big plastic box,” she says. “So I would not recommend satin on the siding.” Instead, save satin for the exterior trim and paint the body of your house flat or “low-lustre.”

Looking for the perfect shade of white paint? We’ve got you. And check out all our advice for painting your home here.

Continue reading A guide to paint sheens, from glossy to matte

BENJAMIN MOORE JUST ANNOUNCED THEIR 2017 COLOR OF THE YEAR

And it’s anything but neutral.

Benjamin Moore color of the year

Benjamin Moore

Even though in recent years whites, creams, and beiges have ruled the design world, Benjamin Moore is taking a bold step away from this safe choice. Sure, last year their color for 2016 was Simply White OC-117, but this year they went with something they describe as a rich, deep amethyst: Shadow.

“After a year of looking at white, we were looking for something with more feeling,” a spokesperson for the company said at their reveal party at the New York Public library this week. The company also shared a palette of 22 colors they recommend pairing with this statement hue, which includes other jewel tones like ruby and emerald.

Here, the color is seen in a grand entryway and show homeowners you don’t have to go light and airy with your entrance. Sometimes a dramatic, in-your-face hue does a better job setting a sophisticated tone to your home.

image

Need some more inspiration? Here are a few designer-approved ways to use different shades of purple and plum in your home. Our advice? Don’t just limit yourself to the walls. Why not use doors, ceilings, and more to add a pop of trendy color to your home’s decor?

[h/t People]

WATCH NEXT

You Can Now Book A Commercial Flight To One Of The Most Remote Places On Earth

Continue reading BENJAMIN MOORE JUST ANNOUNCED THEIR 2017 COLOR OF THE YEAR

35 BEST GREY PAINTS ACCORDING TO TOP INTERIOR DESIGNERS

From calming pale colors to edgier dark tones, top talent keeps coming back to these sleek shades.

image

Douglas Friedman

Grey is the cooler, chicer cousin of white that we can’t stop lusting after. The neutral color can create a calming, elegant or even electrifying effect, making it the perfect option for any decor and personal style. Grey paints come in an array of hues, from subtle pale shades to deep rich pigments.

Here, designers share their favorite shades of grey for stunning interiors.

SILVER BLADE, FINE PAINTS OF EUROPE
best grey paints

Fine Paints of Europe

“To me, Silver Blade by Fine Paints of Europe is a rich, elegant and classic gray that elevates any room. It contrasts beautifully with light and dark colors as well as all textures. Always welcoming you in.” – Raquel Garcia
SHOP

PURBECK STONE, FARROW & BALL
best grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“A lovely warm neutral that enriches the space, and looks amazing with any wood floor stain. I love this color because of its versatility, and can be used in both formal and casual settings. The color is always pleasing to the eye.” – Amanda Sacy
SHOP

CORNFORTH WHITE, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“This is a perfect tone of grey. It catches light beautifully. It’s subtle and very chic. It is the perfect complement to any other neutral.” – Nicole Fuller
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
MOLE’S BREATH, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“This rich, warm gray is the perfect neutral when you want to create depth in a space. It works equally well in small spaces to cozy them up, as well as large rooms to make them feel inviting. I also love it as a trim color to add sophisticated glamour to your millwork and moldings. A kiss from a Mole never seemed sweeter!” – Donna Mondi
SHOP

PLUMBAGO GRAY, FIRED EARTH
grey paints

Fired Earth

“This rich shade has warm blue undertones, which makes one feel right at home. It’s sophisticated tone makes any space feel chic.” – Birgit Klein
SHOP

GRAY OWL, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“This fabulous gray reminds me of French porcelain — cool with a slight hint of green. Great for morning light! Try it in a white kitchen to lacquer barstools and pop them with shades of buttercup.” – Christine Markatos Lowe
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
GRAYTINT, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“This is the perfect whisper of grey to add to a room where you want a crisp, tailored look but something more than white or ivory. It provides a lovely soft highlight to decorative trim in traditional settings, and is cool enough to provide a modern edge to more contemporary interiors.” – Emilie Munroe
SHOP

CHARLESTON GRAY, FARROW & BALL
grey paints

Farrow & Ball

“Hands down my favorite gray paint is Charleston Gray by Farrow & Ball. It’s a deep, sumptuous shade of gray that wraps you like a velvety fog. I use it when I’m trying to create intimacy in an oversized space, or warmth in small room with little natural light.” – Patrick Ediger
SHOP

PANTONE CHARCOAL GRAY, VALSPAR PAINT
grey paints

Valspar Paint

“A perfect backdrop for art collectors and enthusiasts. This grey sets a bold tone and pairs beautifully in a monochromatic setting or one with a stark contrast. I’m a firm believer in giving a big impression in a subtle way and this grey never falls flat.” – Becky Shea
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
ARTIST GREY, RALPH LAUREN
grey paints

Ralph Lauren Home

“This color is true to Ralph Lauren. It is a chameleon color in the sense that it works with many different tones of grey and blue.” – Robin Strickler
SHOP

CITY SHADOW, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

Benjamin Moore

“For millwork and cabinetry, I frequently come back to Benjamin Moore’s City Shadow. The color is bold and dynamic, while maintaining a warmth and softness that many dark grey’s can lack.” – Katie Hackworth
SHOP

GRAY CASHMERE, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

American Artist/Benjamin Moore

“For me, this is a no-fail selection. I’ve used it in bathrooms, kitchens, garden rooms, and bedrooms – all with beautiful results. It has the perfect amount of blue saturation to pair with bronze, green, periwinkle, or even spice. I prefer it EXTRA glossy on paneling!” – Meredith Ellis
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
SILVER CHAIN #BM1472, BENJAMIN MOORE
grey paints

American Artist/Benjamin Moore

“It is soft and works well in both traditional and modern rooms. I recently used it on the cabinetry of a townhouse kitchen with countertops in super white quartzite.” – Mark Cunningham
SHOP

PASSIVE, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
grey paints

American Artist/Sherwin Williams

“This is a light airy grey that enhances architecture with subtle shadows, but doesn’t become too heavy or drab…A happy grey! I love it for bathrooms, kitchens or bedrooms.” – Jeff Andrews
SHOP

GUGGENHEIM COLOR G042, FINE PAINTS OF EUROPE
grey paints

American Artist/Fine Paints Of Europe

“As an avid art collector, this gray in their Eurolux Interior Matte, is the perfect backdrop for any collection. The matte finish absorbs natural and artificial light allowing the space to come alive with undertones that appear to make the walls gradually change throughout the day. Very alluring!” – Patrick Planeta of Planeta Design Group
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
AGREEABLE GRAY, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s faint enough to be a neutral, but saturated enough to make a difference.” – J. Randall Powers
SHOP

AMMONITE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s the perfect neutral and a great alternative to off-white. I recently painted a wood paneled room this color, and the overall effect was warm and inviting.” – CeCe Barfield Thompson
SHOP

CHEATING HEART, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“The biggest fear to overcome when using a dark color is that it will make your room feel smaller. Not true! A dark color makes the walls seem to disappear and adds incredible drama to a room. This charcoal has just the right amount of brown in it to add warmth. It’s as gorgeous on walls as it is on millwork and trim. I’ve even used it on the bottom of a claw foot tub.” – Jen Going
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
CHELSEA GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I use this shade over and over again on cabinets and vanities because it is the perfect medium-dark gray. It has warmth, but never looks brown, and has enough pigment to make a statement without shouting. Such a classic!” – Erin Gates
SHOP

CLOUD, DUNN-EDWARDS PAINT
image

Megan Tatem

“It feels soft and airy, but is still saturated enough to make an impact and elevate a space. It’s incredibly versatile, working in anything from traditional to modern spaces, and pretty much everything in between. I love it paired with white for a crisp, clean contrast, and with dark charcoal for more dramatic feel.” – Jessica McClendon
SHOP

CONFORTH WHITE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This pale gray paint has a touch of taupe/lavender that provides a wonderful neutral backdrop to both traditional and modern interiors. I love how the color evolves over the day: cooler earlier in the day and a bit more moody at night.” – Grant Gibson
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
DOWN PIPE, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s such a beautiful shade that works with a mixture of tones and finishes. The color has a deep richness that doesn’t fall flat and can give a space a great punch, especially when paired with light colors for high contrast.” – Shannon Wollack & Brittany Zwickl of Studio Life.Style
SHOP

ELEPHANT’S BREATH, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This warm and luxuriant shade is stunning in a room with white woodwork and crystal chandeliers. Pop it with coral or hot pink.” – Dana Gibson
SHOP

GRAY OWL, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“This gray is super classic and sophisticated, but not boring AT ALL. It’s a very, very warm gray – meaning that it’s still a cool tone, but has more yellow in it than blue.” – Emily Henderson
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
HORIZON GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I like that it is light and airy. It is a whisper of barely there color. This gray doesn’t go green, blue or lavender. It is a perfect neutral backdrop!” – Summer Thornton
SHOP

IRON MOUNTAIN, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I look for dimension within paint colors, something that shifts a little from day to night. I love the subtle depth and warm brown underpinning of this shade. This deep, dark gray is beautiful in a matte wall finish, stunning in satin for millwork, or easily pulls off sexy in a gorgeous gloss for furniture and cabinetry.” – Drew McGukin
SHOP

LAMP ROOM GRAY, FARROW & BALL
image

Megan Tatem

“This shade of gray is pretty because it has a little taupe in it that makes it very chic. It can be beautiful in a living room, dining room, or bedroom.” – Alex Papachristidis
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
MODERN GRAY, SHERWIN WILLIAMS
image

Megan Tatem

“This is the ideal background color: warm, soft, and plays well with everyone. It’s like the consummate party hostess who brings out the best in every guest. It’s the perfect backdrop for blues (denim, chambray, navy) in a living room, and makes olive green look fantastic. It can handle fuchsia and orange in a bunk room, but also goes beautifully soft with creams and grays when used in a master bedroom or kitchen.” – Allison Bloom
SHOP

PASHMINA, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s a rich, warm gray that creates an inviting, intimate space. It’s also a perfect exterior color paired with a dark charcoal trim.” – Karen Vidal
SHOP

REVERE PEWTER, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I keep coming back to this paint color again and again. It’s warm enough to use in a space with little sunlight, but not too warm to be considered “greige.” It looks soft and rich without overtaking the room.” – Amanda Reynal
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
RODEO, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It has the right mix of warm and cool undertones to be a true gray. It has just enough brown to achieve that perfect warm gray. It looks beautiful on walls, trim, paneling and cabinetry – use it everywhere!” – Wendy Labrum
SHOP

SLEIGH BELLS, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“This color is warm without being muddy, and it has just the perfect amount of pigment – dark enough to be sophisticated and crisp, light enough to be bright and airy.” – Orlando Soria for Homepolish
SHOP

STONINGTON GRAY, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“I’ve found that this hue looks pure and fresh at any time of day or in any type of space. It’s not too dark, not too light…it’s just right.” – Caitlin Murray
SHOP

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
WHISPER, BENJAMIN MOORE
image

Megan Tatem

“It’s a super soft and subtle shade of gray that feels fresh, light and airy. It reflects light beautifully to really open up a space, and serves as the perfect neutral backdrop.” – Nicole Gibbons
SHOP

WINTER’S GATE, PRATT & LAMBERT
image

Megan Tatem

“This color has the ideal hint of color for homeowners that may be too shy to jump out of their beige comfort zone. It’s light enough to read as a neutral and is a beautiful balance for bright white trim. It’s ultra versatile on ceilings, as it complements both light and dark wall colors.” – James Wheeler
SHOP

WATCH NEXT

Meghan Markle’s Bridal Style Is All The Buzz

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

The Best White Paints According To Interior Designers!

INTERIOR DESIGNERS

White paint can make or break a room. Here’s what you need to know about the best shades.

jae joo

Julia Robbs

When it comes to white paint, there are a slew of timeless hues to choose from. Since finding the right shade can be a daunting task, we checked in with some of our favorite interior designers to find out their go-to white paint colors for just about every room.

Chalk White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“My favorite white paint color is Benjamin Moore 2126-70. It is appropriately named Chalk White–a grey scale white, which works universally juxtaposed with cool and warm tones. I use this color for paint, stain finishes, custom color reverse painted glass and metal as a foil contrasting with other elements. Almost every paint schedule our firm issues includes this shade of white.” – Katherine Newman

BUY NOW

Snow Leopard, Portola

white paint
Portola

“My favorite choice for white is Snow Leopard by Portola. I am always in search of a white color with depth, but without other discernible tints. This color creates a beautiful backdrop for both modern and traditional projects. Best of all, it is truly white when it’s up but creates a beautiful, warm environment.” – Kazuko Hoshino

BUY NOW

Navajo White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“Think melted vanilla ice cream. Its cream undertone makes it the perfect white for a country house and warm, naturally-lit spaces. You can do a whole room in Navajo White and it stands alone and gives it a soul.” – Alexandra Champalimaud

BUY NOW

Intense White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“One of the best interior white paints is Benjamin Moore’s Intense White OC-51. It’s a warm white that has a light taupe undertone. The universal shade works well in a traditional or modern aesthetic. It’s the perfect hue for a bedroom, entertaining space or home office where the mood calls for a sophisticated and intimate environment.” – Kesha Franklin

BUY NOW

Strong White, Farrow & Ball

white paint
Farrow & Ball

“We use Strong White from Farrow & Ball, because it is the most neutral white but has a milky quality to it. It does not have pink or yellow undertones, and it also has a softness and depth that is needed in a true white.” – Caroline Grant and Dolores Suarez, Dekar Design

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“The most universal paint color I’ve used is Chantilly Lace by Benjamin Moore. I find myself going back to it again and again in order to create a bright white space that is warm and welcoming rather than sterile and cold. In a sea of whites, this is my tried and true!” – Nicole Davis

BUY NOW

Bancroft White DC-01, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“Why: Consistent, transitional across many styles and clean. We love its ability to translate to base moldings, door trims, doors and ceilings so seamlessly no matter the aesthetic—modern, rustic or traditional. It just works.” – Becky Shea

BUY NOW

Whisper, Dunn-Edwards

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW
best white paints
Dunn-Edwards

“I must admit I have a sore spot for colors with whimsical names. This one especially ‘whispered’ to me when I was looking to paint my entire office and showroom in Guadalajara. This color is a very calm, soothing tone that mimics the shade of white found in nature. I love it because it’s primitive but very organic.” – Erick Millan

BUY NOW

White Dove, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“White Dove has a creamy undertone that brings a lovely warmth to homes in urban environments or those in climates that often experience grey and overcast skies. Meanwhile, in more traditional settings, White Dove reads as a crisp white without being too cold or modern.” – Emilie Munroe

“I love to use White Dove by Benjamin Moore. It’s so versatile! Because I focus a lot on art and artists in my work, this color never fights with sculptures, street art or abstracts. My favorite thing to do is apply one coat of Wise Owl’s Opalescent Pearl Glaze over the White Dove. It softly shimmers with directional lighting, and the walls ‘slow dance’ without fighting with the art, fabrics and rugs. It’s clean, simple and timeless!” – Kari Whitman

BUY NOW

Design Studio White, Ralph Lauren

best white paints
Ralph Lauren

“White seems to be a simple color. However, it has many shades. I like Design Studio White by Ralph Lauren because it’s a white wash with no yellow and cream tones. It’s a fantastic option for a home.” – Todd Amirian

BUY NOW

Cloud White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“Cloud White by Benjamin Moore is ethereal and soft. It is a timeless shade of white that works to either modernize or pare down a space without making it seem too sterile.” – Anne Hepfer

BUY NOW

Extra White, Sherwin-Williams

best white paints
Sherwin-Williams

“This color is crisp and clean, but not too stark. It complements all different interiors.” – Robin Strickler

BUY NOW

Dune White, Benjamin Moore

white paint
Benjamin Moore

“I am currently having a love affair with Benjamin Moore’s Dune White. I veer away from whites that are too clear and absent of pigment. I like the knocked-down elements of Dune White. It’s a warm, flattering color inside and outside. I tell my clients it’s a true white with the dimmer switch dialed down.” – Janie Molster

BUY NOW

Wevet No.273, Farrow & Ball

best white paints
Farrow & Ball
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“I love a good white with plenty of depth. Wevet by Farrow & Ball is one of my favorites for this reason. It has a beautiful hue of gray. It always looks brilliant and has great contrast that goes with many of my other favorites as well as looking beautiful on its own.” – Raquel Garcia

BUY NOW

Super White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love super white. I find it’s the cleanest and crispest and ALWAYS brightens my spaces. It’s too cool for some people’s preferences. For me, it’s spot on!” – Tali Roth

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“It feels clean and bright without being cold or ‘dormy’.” – Melanie Burnstin

BUY NOW

Crisp Linen, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“When it comes to white paint, I always prefer a warm undertone versus cool. Simply White by Benjamin Moore is my go-to, and for a slightly more historical lived-in feel, I warm it up a bit with Crisp Linen, also from Benjamin Moore.” – Katie Hackworth

BUY NOW

Calm, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
Benjamin Moore

“What could be more appropriate in one’s bedroom retreat than the feeling of calm, promoting quiet, reflective and relaxing moments?” – Dayna Dabek

Simply White, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
American Artist

“Benjamin Moore Simply White is my go-to for a kitchen. It just feels right–not too cool, not too warm.” – Victoria Hagan

“Benjamin Moore Natura Simply White has a slight warm undertone, which keeps it from feeling too sterile (no hospital vibes here). I have yet to come across a color scheme Simply White wouldn’t complement. It also really goes to work in those darker spaces with little to no natural light because the paint color itself simply radiates. Bonus, this is an eco-friendly zero VOC paint for the environmentally conscious!” – Meridith Baer

BUY NOW

White Diamond, Benjamin Moore

best white paints
American Artist
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“My old living room was painted this super cool white and I loved it for the space. I loved it because generally I’m more attracted to cool tones rather than warm tones. If you put it up to a true white, it looked a little blue. But in person, it just looked really white. So if you are looking for the perfect cool white, then this is a great option for you, as it doesn’t have any yellow or cream tones in it.” – Emily Henderson

BUY NOW

China White, Pratt & Lambert

best white paints
American Artist

“I just painted my apartment China White by Pratt & Lambert. It is NOT the same as the one by Benjamin Moore. It’s really pretty and has become one of my new favorites. It’s a warm white that has just the right amount of grey in it to make it feel fresh and not too stark.” – Shawn Henderson

BUY NOW

China White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It seldom fails me, no matter where in the country I use it. It doesn’t break green or pink. When held up against pure white, it has an off-white or greige appearance, but on its own, it holds up as true white—but with a little more body.” – Eric Cohler

BUY NOW

All White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s like a good friend. Easy to be around, dependable and it makes you and all the things around you look terrific. It stays consistent in any light, but in the afternoon, it can really make a room feel like it’s glowing.” – Brad Ford

BUY NOW

Cotton, C2 Paint

white paints
Megan Tatem

“White is not a shy color—it makes everything placed in its path come forward. And Cotton by C2 is the softest of whites, with a touch of yellow as its undertone. It’s the perfect backdrop to enhance wood and I especially love it in bedrooms. It makes skin sparkle.” – Elizabeth Martin

BUY NOW

Honeymilk, Valspar

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Getting white paint right can be a daunting proposition. Your best bet is a kinder, warmer white that has just a hint of grey or beige in it. Honeymilk is a soft white that’s great for walls. I’ve used it in a gazillion rooms and have never been disappointed.” – Elaine Griffin

ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

BUY NOW

Lily of the Valley, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I found this color more than 20 years ago when I wanted a really great, warm white for trim, and it has been my standby ever since. It works well in rooms that get a lot of light and also in those that need it.” – Alessandra Branca

BUY NOW

Great White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s a white with character, and it’s anything but sterile. Great White works best in natural light, particularly in the morning when fresh, warm tones peek in. Throughout the day, it changes color ever so slightly—from white to not-quite-grey.” – Kara Mann

BUY NOW

Decorator’s White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love this white for ceilings and woodwork, or in any room where I want a bright, clean white. It works well in all applications and with every kind of light source. Some whites can be cold and slightly blue, while others can have a creamy, yellow tone, but Decorator’s White is a true white that is both warm and modern.” – Jeff Andrews

“Nothing beats a clean crisp white wall and my go-to is Benjamin Moore Decorator’s White. It is crisp and slightly cool, making it the the perfect backdrop to pop other colors used within a room.” – Ohara Davies-Gaetano

BUY NOW

Paper White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I use Paper White in kitchens and bathrooms because it melds the greys of Carrara marble and the stark white of sinks and toilets.” – Katie Ridder

BUY NOW

Pointing, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“This is the perfect ivory for almost every setting—not too bright and not too creamy. We’re all about striking that balance. It’s proven itself in both a sun-drenched farmhouse living room and a one-windowed New York City bedroom.” – Anne Maxwell Foster and Suysel dePedro Cunningham of Tilton Fenwick

BUY NOW

White Wisp, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“It’s a tinted white with a hint of grey-green, but it reads as bright white. I like to use it on the trim for cool-colored walls. I use quite a bit of wall coverings in hemp cloth and other natural materials. White Wisp as a trim makes many of these papers look crisp.” – Frank Roop

BUY NOW

Huntington White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I discovered my favorite, Huntington White, through much trial and error while working on my line of paint for Benjamin Moore. It’s pleasingly chameleon-like. It saturates and radiates consistently, where many whites are inconsistent and change appearance during different times of day.” – Darryl Carter

BUY NOW

Super White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“It’s the most pure expression of white with no color undertones. It reminds me of the galleries at the Gagosian Gallery. What I love about this color is that it makes your furnishings stand out like a piece of art.” – Jon Call

BUY NOW

Wimborne White, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem

“What I love about the Farrow & Ball Wimborne White is that it is a beautiful shade of white that has depth and dimension. Using it in high-gloss achieves a very chic and modern look without using a real lacquer.” – Suzanne Kasler

BUY NOW

Winter Orchard, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“I love Winter Orchard because it has a super subtle tinge of grey in it, so it works with every color.” – Taniya Nayak

BUY NOW

Swiss Coffee, Dunn Edwards

white paints
Megan Tatem

“There should be one cozy room, such as the living room, in every home. In this type of space, I like to use white paint as the backdrop for an amazing collection of art, which brings a pop of color. For me, the perfect shade of white, like this one from Dunn Edwards, isn’t too yellow or too pink.” – Trip Haenisch

BUY NOW

Slipper Satin, Farrow & Ball

white paints
Megan Tatem
ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW

“Slipper Satin is my go to for ‘fleshing up’ more traditional rooms, as it is calming and gives a sense of ease and serenity. It is inviting and cozy, yet also works well on more architectural houses punctuating the accoutrements.” – Jeffrey Alan Marks

BUY NOW

Historic White, Dunn Edwards

white paints
Megan Tatem

“The classic warm white complements any interior then, now and forever. Ultra-premium paint from the DE Everest collection gives clients low-odor, zero-VOC finishes that are durable and contribute to good indoor air quality.” – Sarah Barnard

BUY NOW

Acadia White, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Acadia White by Benjamin Moore is my go-to Goldilocks. Not too warm, not too cool, but just right. It’s the perfect creamy off-white.” – Patrick Ediger

BUY NOW

Chantilly Lace, Benjamin Moore

white paints
Megan Tatem

“Lace is crisp and bright while having enough depth to avoid a sterile look. It’s a white on the cold side, but able to bring in warm tones as well—excellent used where modern and traditional meet.” – Moises Esquenazi

BUY NOW

WATCH NEXT

Meghan Markle’s Bridal Style Is All The Buzz

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

ASID News

SCALE 2018: A Student Event Like No Other

SCALE: The ASID National Student Summit took place in the thriving, rejuvenated heart of L.A., February 23-25, 2018. Attracting more than 400 attendees from over 70 colleges and universities across the country, SCALE explored relevant, timely topics in design and included experiences created to ready students for their first professional positions. Through exclusive tours of top design firms and projects, students caught a glimpse of their futures and what they can expect from life as a working design professional.

Continue reading ASID News

The Hottest Colors To Paint Your House Right Now

Picking out paint colors for your home’s exterior is more complicated than it seems. You have to consider three different complementary hues — siding, front door, and trim — and given the cost (and effort!) involved in painting your whole house, the pressure to get it right is real. Benjamin Moore gave us the deets on what colors are the hottest to paint your house right now, so you can rest assured knowing you’re at least on trend. And aren’t choosing something that’s destined to be dated in six months.

Continue reading The Hottest Colors To Paint Your House Right Now

Scared of Dark Paint? Don’t Be!

Judging from the pages of shelter magazines and interior designers’ Instagram feeds, dark colors are in. And paint companies are offering plenty of options.

Earlier this month, Sherwin-Williams picked a rich, moody blue called Oceanside as its 2018 color of the year. Benjamin Moore named Caliente, an intense shade of red, its upcoming color of the year, and its newest line of paint, Century, is composed of 75 saturated colors like Amethyst, Black Currant and Obsidian. Glidden Paint chose a black called Deep Onyx as its next color of the year, and Olympic Paints & Stains named Black Magic its choice for 2018.

The deep, rich colors promoted for years by companies like the decorator favorite Farrow & Ball, it seems, are finally going mainstream. “From the beautiful, vivacious tones of Radicchio to the super-dark rich of Studio Green, Farrow & Ball is seeing more confidence within decorating choices as we head into 2018,” Charlotte Cosby, who heads up the company’s creative team, wrote in an email.

Joa Studholme, Farrow & Ball’s international color consultant, attributed the trend to a desire to cocoon. “We’re sort of surrounding ourselves with comfort, and one of the ways we’re doing it is through color – to make our homes feel sort of nurturing and tender,” she said. “Instead of coming into clean, white houses, we’re going into homes that sort of give us a hug.”

For those of us more comfortable with whitewashed walls, however, it’s not so easy to make the leap to eggplant or onyx. But here are some tips from design and color experts on how to use dark colors without becoming overwhelmed — or claustrophobic.

29fix2-master1050

START SMALL If you’re nervous about playing with a deep, dark hue, “limit the color to the inside of cabinets, backs of bookshelves or a painted floor,” said Donald Kaufman, who owns the paint company Donald Kaufman Color with his wife, Taffy Dahl. “Dark, bold windows often bring the outside in.”

Ms. Studholme, of Farrow & Ball, suggested starting with a contained space like a powder room, the underside of a claw-foot tub or a hallway. “When you arrive, it creates a sense of drama,” she said. “You come through and go, ‘Wow.’” An added bonus, she noted: “A dark color in the hall makes the rooms off the hall feel really big and light.”

Ellen O’Neill, director of strategic design intelligence for Benjamin Moore, recommends starting with a focal point, like a fireplace mantel or the inside of shelves or drawers. “I recently photographed a home where the owner painted the inside of the drawers of an antique Chippendale chest a rich aubergine,” she said. “What a color surprise every time you open a drawer.” And as you become more confident, she said, “you can graduate to painting doors to a room or hallway, window trim or wainscoting.”

TEST IT OUT When you’re ready to tackle a whole room, “start with a color family that is already dominant in the home and select two to three shades that you feel makes a statement,” Ms. O’Neill said. “I’d get quarts of each color and paint large swatches of each, one set next to a window and one set in a corner. Observe how the room’s lighting affects the colors three times a day.”

EMBRACE THE DARKNESS “A deep, rich color goes an especially long way in a room without a lot of natural light, as dim rooms look particularly dull in lighter colors,” said Frances Merrill, the founder of Reath Design in Los Angeles, who painted her children’s room Farrow & Ball’s Pigeon gray. “It makes the small space feel finished and gives definition to the ever-rotating collection of artwork.”

In the playroom, she used Templeton Gray from Benjamin Moore. “Every surface in this room is usually covered in a layer of Legos and half-finished science experiments,” she said. “I find that the deeper colors mask the chaos.”

29fix4-master675

“Conventional wisdom states that small spaces — especially those facing north — should be lightened to increase the sense of space,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Instituteconsultancy. “However, painting trim a lighter color in an area painted with darker hues can actually increase the illusion of space,” she said, because it creates a “greater impression of height or width in the space.”

Whatever your situation, “it’s best to work with what you’ve got, rather than try to fight the light,” said Ms. Studholme of Farrow & Ball, which offers a guide to how light affects color on its website.

PREPARATION IS KEY “Before painting, ensure surfaces are sound, clean, dry and free from dirt, grease and any other contamination,” said Ms. Cosby of Farrow & Ball. “Always sand down surfaces to achieve a smooth base.”

And if you change your mind later, dark colors are just as easy to paint over as light ones, assuming you prep properly. “Start by priming over the bold hue, then apply two coats of the desired color,” said Ms. O’Neill of Benjamin Moore. But “be sure to allow the primer coat to dry completely before applying the first coat of color.”

GO HALFSIES To add “sophistication and spirit” to a client’s “stark, boxy, white rental,” Alex Kalita, a founder of Common Bond Design in Manhattan, painted the bottom half of the bedroom wall in Hague Bluefrom Farrow & Ball. She calls it “the chair-rail effect” and notes that it serves a few purposes: “It simulates architectural variation in otherwise uniform space; it ties in the building’s teal window frames; and it leverages the cozy, rich, complex and grown-up quality of Hague Blue, while maintaining the practical qualities of white paint, like the illusion of ceiling height.”

29fix1-blog427

Another tip: “If you’re tempted to go dark and bold on the walls, but you prefer a restrained aesthetic, try keeping the furniture neutral,” Ms. Kalita said. “You can even make bulkier pieces recede by camouflaging them in the wall color. We had our client’s Wonk NYC dresser color-matched to Hague Blue, so that the piece could augment the client’s storage without competing for attention with the room’s more deliberate and sculptural design elements. Dark walls do a good job of visually absorbing things.”

FINALLY, BE BRAVE “I encourage people to be brave with color and unleash their inner artist,” said Ms. Eiseman of the Pantone Color Institute. “Experiment with color, have fun with it, allow yourself to live with it for a while. It is, after all, just one or two cans of paint. And when, and if, you tire of it, move on to another color and treat yourself to another creative exercise.”

For more information about this blog Click Here!

%d bloggers like this: