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ASID Invests in University Students Through Competition and Campus Events

07/30/2019 By American Society of Interior Designers (ASID)

As back-to-school season approaches, so do opportunities for design students to engage in individual career development; get hands-on experience; and learn from their peers, mentors and future employers.

SCALEX, a series of daylong events tailored to undergraduate design students, has gone live for 2019. Held in October at schools across the nation, SCALEX offers students and educators alike the chance to:

  • Hear from design experts on relevant topics (Photo Courtesy ASID)
  • Participate in innovative discussions with top panels
  • Explore real-life scenarios to better prepare undergrads for life as a professional designer

After attending, students are equipped with resources they can take with them throughout their professional career, and educators are able to augment and expand their curricula.

Developed as a local version of SCALE: The ASID National Student Summit, SCALEX is a full day event, designed to bring the same innovation and immersion directly to local communities.

Creating Trendy Lighting That Lasts

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(Photo Courtesy ASID​: At the ASID National Student Summit, held in New York from March 1-3, ASID named the winners of the 2019 ASID Student Portfolio Competition. Five winners and seven finalists were announced.​ Front row left to right: Jieru Lin, Jessica Ma, Seyedehnastaran Hashemi, Jumana Almukhtar, Ara Kim, Crystal Martin, Yi-En Lee. Back row left to right: Jianfeng Ni, Haopeng Lin, Sloan Aulgur, Kelsey Muir, Xuan Dang.) 

[Related topic: Cultural Competency a Top Priority for the Future of Interior Design]

Attend SCALEX near you:

  • Oct. 11: The New York School of Interior Design, New York
  • Oct. 18: Columbia College, Chicago
  • Oct. 30: Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

2019 ASID Student Portfolio Competition

At the ASID National Student Summit, held in New York from March 1-3, ASID named the winners of the 2019 ASID Student Portfolio Competition.


(Photo Courtesy ASID)

This is an annual competition that generates the best collection of student design projects in the nation. The competition selects winners and finalists based on:

  • Conceptual thought
  • Content and quality of submitted work
  • The student’s ability to articulate their process

Winners receive a scholarship from Benjamin Moore and national recognition. The jury of esteemed judges selected five winners and seven finalists.

2019 ASID Student Portfolio Competition Winners:


(Photo Courtesy ASID)

2019 ASID Student Portfolio Competition Finalists:

  • Jumana Almukhtar, Savannah College of Art & Design
  • Sloan Aulgur, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  • Seyedehnastaran Hashemi, Texas Tech University
  • Yi-En Lee, New York School of Interior Design
  • Haopeng-Lin, Pratt Institute
  • Crystal Martin, Savannah College of Art & Design
  • Kelsey Muir, Virginia Tech

Read this next: Ruckus Storage Offers Flexible Classrooms for Back-to-School

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See the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Photography by Marco Ricca.

 

Springtime holds a special place in the heart of New Yorkers; as the city thaws and NYCxDesign draws ever closer, the annual reveal of the Kips Bay Decorator Show House never fails to kick off the season on a high note. This year was no exception. A total of 23 designers overhauled the 22-room, 12,000 square-foot Upper East Side residence chosen to host this year’s Show House.

The show of top talent in architecture and interior design draws thousands of visitors per year to benefit the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club. Each designer was given seven weeks to completely overhaul their assigned rooms in the residence, which opened to the public on May 2 and will remain open through May 30. Kohler, AJ Madison, Hearst Design Group, Morgan Stanley, Benjamin Moore, Cambria, The Rug Company, The Shade Store, New York Design Center, and Schumacher sponsored this year’s Show House.

Read More: Stars of Design Shine Brightly at the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club President’s Dinner

Highlights from the transformed property, located at 36-38 East 74th Street, include Sheila Bridges‘ delightfully playful Salon des Chiens near the entryway. What would traditionally be the home’s reception area was transformed by Bridges into a space for dogs and their walkers to clean up after outings about the city and relax.

Upstairs, designer Young Huh turned the top-floor aerie into a feminine artist’s studio. According to Huh, the “environment of strong silhouettes, bold strokes of color and pattern,” celebrate the act of contemplation and creativity. A floor-to-ceiling collage—a wallcovering by Fromental—is evocative of Cubist master George Braques, while eclectic artwork from Cynthia Byrnes Contemporary Art compliments the mood of playful exuberance. 

Several designers, including Corey Damen Jenkins and Associates, Eve Robinson Associates, Paloma Contreras, and Sarah Bartholomew Design, created refreshingly bright studies and libraries for the lady of the house. 

Keep reading to see every room from the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House. The residence is open through May 30, 2019.

Charlotte Moss. Photography by Nicholas Sargent. 
Christopher Peacock. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Corey Damen Jenkins and Associates, LLC. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Cullman & Kravis Associates. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Delaney + Chin. Photography by Luis Sanchez Hernandez.
Eve Robinson Associates. Photography by Marco Ricca.
Gluckstein Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
J. Cohler Mason Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Jeff Lincoln Interiors, Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Jim Dove Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Katherine Newman Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Matthew Monroe Bees. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Paloma Contreras. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Pappas Miron. Design Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Peter Pennoyer Architects. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Richard Rabel Interiors + Art, LTD. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Robert Passal Interior Design in collaboration with Daniel Kahan Architecture. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Sarah Bartholomew Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Sheila Bridges Design, Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Studio DB. Photography by Matthew Williams Photography.
Vicente Wolf Associates. Photography by Vicente Wolf.
Young Huh LLC. Photography by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

Can’t get enough of Kips Bay? Check out the 2018 Decorator Show House.

For More Information About This Blog Post, Click Here! 

ASID Events

NATIONAL
JUN
10
ASID at NeoCon

DESCRIPTION

NeoCon® is the world’s leading platform and most important event of the year for the commercial design industry. With nearly 1 million square feet of exhibition space, NeoCon will feature game-changing products and services from both leading companies and emerging talent–providing unparalleled access to the latest and most innovative solutions in commercial design.

 

DATE AND TIME

8:00 AM
6/10/2019 – 6/12/2019

LOCATION

theMART
222 Merchandise Mart Plaza
Suite 470
Chicago, IL 60654
United States

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KEYNOTE WITH ILSE CRAWFORD OF STUDIOILSE

Date: June 11, 2019
Time: 8 a.m.
Location: NeoCon Theater, 19th Floor, theMart

Stuff Matters: The Material World We Make

Ilse Crawford is a designer, academic, and creative director with a simple mission:  to put human needs and desires at the center of all she does. As founder of Studioilse, together with her multi-disciplinary, London-based team, she brings her philosophy to life. This means creating environments where humans feel comfortable; public spaces that make people feel at home; and homes that are habitable and make sense for the people who live in them. It means designing furniture and products that support and enhance human behavior and actions in everyday life. It means restoring the human balance in brands and businesses that have lost their way.

ASID INSTALLATION

Date: Throughout NeoCon

ASID is thrilled to showcase the impact of design through an exciting new installation custom designed by Elizabeth von Lehe, Allied ASID, design and brand strategy principal, HDR. The space serves as an oasis that invites visitors to engage, ask broad questions, and explore the beautiful, impactful, and sometimes surprising ways that design impacts lives.

ASID PRESENTS INSIGHTS FROM THE 2019 OUTCOME OF DESIGN AWARDS

Date: Wednesday, June 12
Time: 8 a.m.

Following the first-ever Outcome of Design Awards, created in collaboration with NeoCon, Herman Miller, and METROPOLIS magazine, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) will explore how design truly impacts lives as seen through occupancy data and analysis.

The Outcome of Design Awards (OODA) honor firms that showcase the power of design through research-driven results and innovative, humancentric concepts. This panel, moderated by ASID, will explore how this design approach can be implemented across projects and will highlight the 2019 OODA winning projects and the data that clearly says it all.

STUDENT PROGRAMING: DESIGN PATHWAYS

Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Time: 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. (panel); 10:30 a.m. – Noon (tour)

Panelists: Meena Krenek, ASID, Gensler; David Euscher, ASID, LEED AP, Corgan; Carolyn Ames Noble, ASID, Ames Design Studio; David Cordell, ASID, Perkins+Will; Jennifer Quail (Moderator, editor-in-chief, i+D)

Showroom/Exhibit Spaces: Allsteel, Benjamin Moore, Humanscale, Keilhauer, Sherwin Williams, True Residential, Wilsonart, Brown Jordan, Construction Specialties, Teknion and Mohawk

Why are trade shows important to the life of an interior designer? A panel of experienced design professionals will explain why trade shows are essential to your career and why it’s imperative to attend them. Our experts will give you insight on what questions to ask, how to evaluate products, and why it is so critical to your success to make connections and establish strong vendor relationships throughout your career.

After the panel discussion, you will break into small groups and tour the show floor with one of our panelists to receive guidance on how to make the most of your time at these important professional events.

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Continue reading ASID Events

See the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Photography by Marco Ricca.

 

Springtime holds a special place in the heart of New Yorkers; as the city thaws and NYCxDesign draws ever closer, the annual reveal of the Kips Bay Decorator Show House never fails to kick off the season on a high note. This year was no exception. A total of 23 designers overhauled the 22-room, 12,000 square-foot Upper East Side residence chosen to host this year’s Show House.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

The show of top talent in architecture and interior design draws thousands of visitors per year to benefit the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club. Each designer was given seven weeks to completely overhaul their assigned rooms in the residence, which opened to the public on May 2 and will remain open through May 30. Kohler, AJ Madison, Hearst Design Group, Morgan Stanley, Benjamin Moore, Cambria, The Rug Company, The Shade Store, New York Design Center, and Schumacher sponsored this year’s Show House.

Read More: Stars of Design Shine Brightly at the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club President’s Dinner

Highlights from the transformed property, located at 36-38 East 74th Street, include Sheila Bridges‘ delightfully playful Salon des Chiens near the entryway. What would traditionally be the home’s reception area was transformed by Bridges into a space for dogs and their walkers to clean up after outings about the city and relax.

Upstairs, designer Young Huh turned the top-floor aerie into a feminine artist’s studio. According to Huh, the “environment of strong silhouettes, bold strokes of color and pattern,” celebrate the act of contemplation and creativity. A floor-to-ceiling collage—a wallcovering by Fromental—is evocative of Cubist master George Braques, while eclectic artwork from Cynthia Byrnes Contemporary Art compliments the mood of playful exuberance. 

Several designers, including Corey Damen Jenkins and Associates, Eve Robinson Associates, Paloma Contreras, and Sarah Bartholomew Design, created refreshingly bright studies and libraries for the lady of the house. 

Keep reading to see every room from the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House. The residence is open through May 30, 2019.

Charlotte Moss. Photography by Nicholas Sargent. 
Christopher Peacock. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Corey Damen Jenkins and Associates, LLC. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Cullman & Kravis Associates. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Delaney + Chin. Photography by Luis Sanchez Hernandez.
Eve Robinson Associates. Photography by Marco Ricca.
Gluckstein Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
J. Cohler Mason Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Jeff Lincoln Interiors, Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Jim Dove Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Katherine Newman Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Matthew Monroe Bees. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Paloma Contreras. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Pappas Miron. Design Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Peter Pennoyer Architects. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Richard Rabel Interiors + Art, LTD. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Robert Passal Interior Design in collaboration with Daniel Kahan Architecture. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Sarah Bartholomew Design. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Sheila Bridges Design, Inc. Photography by Nickolas Sargent.
Studio DB. Photography by Matthew Williams Photography.
Vicente Wolf Associates. Photography by Vicente Wolf.
Young Huh LLC. Photography by Ngoc Minh Ngo.

Can’t get enough of Kips Bay? Check out the 2018 Decorator Show House.

Continue reading See the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Scared of Dark Paint? Don’t Be!

Judging from the pages of shelter magazines and interior designers’ Instagram feeds, dark colors are in. And paint companies are offering plenty of options.

Earlier this month, Sherwin-Williams picked a rich, moody blue called Oceanside as its 2018 color of the year. Benjamin Moore named Caliente, an intense shade of red, its upcoming color of the year, and its newest line of paint, Century, is composed of 75 saturated colors like Amethyst, Black Currant and Obsidian. Glidden Paint chose a black called Deep Onyx as its next color of the year, and Olympic Paints & Stains named Black Magic its choice for 2018.

The deep, rich colors promoted for years by companies like the decorator favorite Farrow & Ball, it seems, are finally going mainstream. “From the beautiful, vivacious tones of Radicchio to the super-dark rich of Studio Green, Farrow & Ball is seeing more confidence within decorating choices as we head into 2018,” Charlotte Cosby, who heads up the company’s creative team, wrote in an email.

Joa Studholme, Farrow & Ball’s international color consultant, attributed the trend to a desire to cocoon. “We’re sort of surrounding ourselves with comfort, and one of the ways we’re doing it is through color – to make our homes feel sort of nurturing and tender,” she said. “Instead of coming into clean, white houses, we’re going into homes that sort of give us a hug.”

For those of us more comfortable with whitewashed walls, however, it’s not so easy to make the leap to eggplant or onyx. But here are some tips from design and color experts on how to use dark colors without becoming overwhelmed — or claustrophobic.

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START SMALL If you’re nervous about playing with a deep, dark hue, “limit the color to the inside of cabinets, backs of bookshelves or a painted floor,” said Donald Kaufman, who owns the paint company Donald Kaufman Color with his wife, Taffy Dahl. “Dark, bold windows often bring the outside in.”

Ms. Studholme, of Farrow & Ball, suggested starting with a contained space like a powder room, the underside of a claw-foot tub or a hallway. “When you arrive, it creates a sense of drama,” she said. “You come through and go, ‘Wow.’” An added bonus, she noted: “A dark color in the hall makes the rooms off the hall feel really big and light.”

Ellen O’Neill, director of strategic design intelligence for Benjamin Moore, recommends starting with a focal point, like a fireplace mantel or the inside of shelves or drawers. “I recently photographed a home where the owner painted the inside of the drawers of an antique Chippendale chest a rich aubergine,” she said. “What a color surprise every time you open a drawer.” And as you become more confident, she said, “you can graduate to painting doors to a room or hallway, window trim or wainscoting.”

TEST IT OUT When you’re ready to tackle a whole room, “start with a color family that is already dominant in the home and select two to three shades that you feel makes a statement,” Ms. O’Neill said. “I’d get quarts of each color and paint large swatches of each, one set next to a window and one set in a corner. Observe how the room’s lighting affects the colors three times a day.”

EMBRACE THE DARKNESS “A deep, rich color goes an especially long way in a room without a lot of natural light, as dim rooms look particularly dull in lighter colors,” said Frances Merrill, the founder of Reath Design in Los Angeles, who painted her children’s room Farrow & Ball’s Pigeon gray. “It makes the small space feel finished and gives definition to the ever-rotating collection of artwork.”

In the playroom, she used Templeton Gray from Benjamin Moore. “Every surface in this room is usually covered in a layer of Legos and half-finished science experiments,” she said. “I find that the deeper colors mask the chaos.”

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“Conventional wisdom states that small spaces — especially those facing north — should be lightened to increase the sense of space,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Instituteconsultancy. “However, painting trim a lighter color in an area painted with darker hues can actually increase the illusion of space,” she said, because it creates a “greater impression of height or width in the space.”

Whatever your situation, “it’s best to work with what you’ve got, rather than try to fight the light,” said Ms. Studholme of Farrow & Ball, which offers a guide to how light affects color on its website.

PREPARATION IS KEY “Before painting, ensure surfaces are sound, clean, dry and free from dirt, grease and any other contamination,” said Ms. Cosby of Farrow & Ball. “Always sand down surfaces to achieve a smooth base.”

And if you change your mind later, dark colors are just as easy to paint over as light ones, assuming you prep properly. “Start by priming over the bold hue, then apply two coats of the desired color,” said Ms. O’Neill of Benjamin Moore. But “be sure to allow the primer coat to dry completely before applying the first coat of color.”

GO HALFSIES To add “sophistication and spirit” to a client’s “stark, boxy, white rental,” Alex Kalita, a founder of Common Bond Design in Manhattan, painted the bottom half of the bedroom wall in Hague Bluefrom Farrow & Ball. She calls it “the chair-rail effect” and notes that it serves a few purposes: “It simulates architectural variation in otherwise uniform space; it ties in the building’s teal window frames; and it leverages the cozy, rich, complex and grown-up quality of Hague Blue, while maintaining the practical qualities of white paint, like the illusion of ceiling height.”

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Another tip: “If you’re tempted to go dark and bold on the walls, but you prefer a restrained aesthetic, try keeping the furniture neutral,” Ms. Kalita said. “You can even make bulkier pieces recede by camouflaging them in the wall color. We had our client’s Wonk NYC dresser color-matched to Hague Blue, so that the piece could augment the client’s storage without competing for attention with the room’s more deliberate and sculptural design elements. Dark walls do a good job of visually absorbing things.”

FINALLY, BE BRAVE “I encourage people to be brave with color and unleash their inner artist,” said Ms. Eiseman of the Pantone Color Institute. “Experiment with color, have fun with it, allow yourself to live with it for a while. It is, after all, just one or two cans of paint. And when, and if, you tire of it, move on to another color and treat yourself to another creative exercise.”

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