Tag Archives: Art Nouveau

We’ve Spent A Year Making This One-Of-A-Kind Book Of Ornaments To Promote Our National Heritage

We are Maria Postea and Bogdan Gargarita, the two illustrators who own a publishing house called Editura Intaglio.

We decided to make “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest” for those of you who are specialized or passionate about architecture, aesthetics, decorative arts and heritage. Whether you are studying architecture, history or visual arts, a specialist in the field or simply an art enthusiast, this collection art book will be a precious reference volume in your library!

More info: kickstarter.com

Us

The two editions

Join us in publishing “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest”, a bilingual (English-Romanian) ornamental art book.

Book mock-up

Neoromanian house

The Neoromanian style developed between 1886 and 1947, in Romania. This National style has many elements in common with the more popular styles of the 1900s movement (Secession, Art Nouveau, Jugendstil) and has Ottoman and medieval influences.

Photograph and illustration

The Neoromanian architecture is valuable for Arts History, Aesthetics and also politically, as a gesture of recovering the national identity.

Neoromanian house

“The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest” presents to you the buildings that once were the pride of our city’s urban landscape, and today they are kept hidden by damage, cables and vandalism.

What is unique about this?

A unique aspect of our project is the fact that we illustrated the ornaments and buildings by hand instead of using photographs. This way, we emphasize the artistic value of the book and provide the perfect alternative to a real exhibition.

Photograph and illustration

The illustrations captivate the viewer and intrigue him to explore the cityscape for himself. More so, through the painted illustrations, we eliminate the unaesthetic elements which distract the viewer from the subject.

Neoromanian house

Some of these buildings are in a state of extreme deterioration. Very few are properly restored. This is why we consider our project a necessity.

Illustration and photograph of a Neoromanian decoration

Neoromanian house in Bucharest

Photograph and illustration of a Neoromanian ornament

Deterioration on a Neoromanian building

Through the album “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest”, we will be able to draw attention to these lost treasures, to raise awareness of their value and to increase conservation and restoration efforts.

Illustrations

The book will have watercolor illustrations with ornaments of exterior decorations and even entire Neoromanian building facades from Bucharest.

Bogdan Gargarita illustrating a house for the art book “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest”

Neoromanian house painted in watercolor by Bogdan Gargarita

Illustrations

The text will be written by an art historian and scientific researcher, Dr. Oana Marinache. “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest” will consist of 96 illustrated, colored pages.

Support our Kickstarter campaign!

You can purchase “The Neoromanian Detail – Bucharest” on our Kickstarter campaign along with other great rewards for helping us make our project a reality!

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Continue reading We’ve Spent A Year Making This One-Of-A-Kind Book Of Ornaments To Promote Our National Heritage

Designers Show How Much Interior Design Has Changed Over The Past 600 Years (12 Pics)

If you ever visited your grandparents’ or your great grandparents’ homes, you probably noticed how differently their rooms are decorated when compared to your own place. But have you though how the same rooms might have looked four, five or even six hundred years ago?

The designers at HomeAdvisor, a digital marketplace for home services, have created a unique project that shows how much the interior design trends changed over the past 600 years. From the wooden panels in Renaissance apartments to the funky and abstract furniture in postmodern style homes, check out the interior design trends throughout the years in the gallery below!

More info: HomeAdvisor.com | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Renaissance (1400 – 1600)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Art and culture were reborn as the French Renaissance spread across Europe. Architects found a renewed enthusiasm for ornate decoration and fine detail, inspired by a new sense of humanism and freedom. Arabesque and Asian influences revitalized the decorative arts, and careful attention to symmetry and geometry brought a new sense of harmony to European interiors.

We designed the cabinet in our Renaissance living room image in the shape of a small palazzo (palace) which was common at the time. Its columns and balconies echo the shape of the building, evoking harmony. The Turkish rug is inspired by one seen in a painting by Hans Holbein the Younger, a German painter who lived in Renaissance-era London. Rugs like this were first woven in western Turkey in the 14th century and became very popular in Renaissance Europe.”

Baroque (1590 – 1725)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Turkish rugs fell out of fashion during the Baroque period, as more opulent and elaborate architecture required fixtures and fittings to match. The Catholic Church was the first to develop this new sense of affluence as an attempt to impress the uneducated masses with their wealth and power. Hence the frames of the Louis XIV-style suite seem to be dripping with gold.

Beneath the gilded finish, the frame of the furniture was often made from tropical wood. Other exotic materials such as ivory were popular, and surfaces such as floors and table-tops were usually marble. Our color scheme here is dramatic and sensual. The play of light around a baroque living room would have been exaggerated to create a sense of movement and enormity.”

Rococo (1700)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Towards the end of the Baroque period, a subset of the style briefly stole the limelight. Rococo style (from the French word rocaille, meaning shell ornamentation) was famous for just three decades during the reign of Louis XV. It is lighter, more whimsical, and freer than Baroque. For some, it better suited the intimacy of the family home than the grand church style that came before it.

The shell and floral motifs in our Rococo living room are typical of the style’s more playful influence on home décor. The cabriole legs and scroll feet of the furniture delicately balance high-spirits and elegance. Social gatherings in the home were becoming more common in the early 18th century. The Rococo style allowed homeowners to demonstrate their wealth and taste without appearing showy or stuffy.”

Neoclassical (1780 – 1880)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“The late Georgian era ushered in a new age of architecture that responded to the Baroque and Rococo periods. The rediscovery of Pompeii contributed to new understandings of Roman and Greek architecture. This inspired a movement towards more ‘tasteful,’ refined, and timeless design principles, free from the pomp and novelty of the Baroque trend.

Notice the straight lines and logical, almost mathematical layout of our Neoclassical living room. These design principles were spread throughout Europe by artists studying at the French Academy in Rome. Note the column-like shape of the fireplace, lamps, and paneling. Colors were mild and undramatic. A plain palate emphasized the stoic, superior sense of form that the Neoclassical embodied.”

Arts and Crafts (1860 – 1910)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“The Arts and Crafts movement began in England as a reaction against the mechanization of creativity and the economic injustices of the industrial age. It was not so much a style as an approach, putting the responsibility for design and craft back in the hands of skilled workers. However, Arts and Crafts interiors shared an aesthetic of simplicity, quality of material, and a connection to nature.

The ideas and look of the Arts and Crafts movement spread to American living rooms via the influence of touring architect-designers, journals, and society lectures. Gustav Stickley was America’s foremost Arts and Crafts designer. You can see his influence in the chunky, function-led woodwork of the furniture in the image, which makes a feature of exposed joinery. This emphasis on wood, brass, and the artisan’s touch gives Arts and Crafts interiors a dark, earthy, and textured palette.”

Art Nouveau (1890 – 1920)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Art Nouveau was a ‘new art’ for a new century. Interior designers paired handcraft with new industrial techniques, which often made for an expensive process. Furniture and fittings were extravagant and modern, exhibiting the influence of Japanese art, which European artists were seeing for the first time near the end of the 19th century.

The vases and lamps in our Art Nouveau living room are inspired by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the celebrated artist and first Design Director at Tiffany’s. His glass-blown forms were a tribute to the natural world, and their lush, iridescent and swirling colors are typical of Art Nouveau.”

Art Deco (1920s to 1960s)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“If Bauhaus and Modernism were the utilization of 20th-century advances, Art Deco was a glamorous celebration. Interior designers were inspired by the geometry and motion of the machine age, materials, and symbols of ancient cultures, and rebirth in nature. And they weren’t afraid to use them all together.

Designers created a feeling of opulence by using a wide range of materials, including lacquered wood, stained glass, stainless steel, aluminum, jewels, and leather. Bold colors and striking contrasts conjured power and confidence.

Strong, straight lines echo through the fireplace and mirror trim to the skyscrapers in the woodcuts on the wall. Note also how these lines boldly counterpoint the shell-shaped sofa, flowing chairs, and spiky ornaments and houseplant.”

Modernism (1880 – 1940)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Like the Arts and Crafts movement, Modernism is less of a style than a philosophy. “A house is a machine for living in,” said Swiss architect and designer Le Corbusier, the pioneer of Modernism. The Modernist living room utilized the latest materials and technologies. It was designed to be comfortable, functional, and affordable. Beauty was a bonus, although elegant design solutions were highly valued.

These ‘limits’ proved inspiring to the first generation of professional ‘interior designers.’ The table you see above is inspired by a famous design by Japanese-American designer Isamu Noguchi. It consists only of a plate of glass, two identical wooden supports, and a pivot rod to hold them together. The original Anglepoise lamp was invented by an engineer who was inspired by his work on vehicle suspension – demonstrating the close connection between Modernist interiors and the 20th-century industry.”

Bauhaus (1919 – 1934)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“The Bauhaus (rhymes with ‘cow-house’) was a hugely influential German school of art and architecture. It existed for just 14 years until the Nazi government closed it down in 1933. Bauhaus design was a radical subset of Modernism, with greater emphasis on the human spirit and the craftsperson. As with Modernism, form followed function. Bauhaus interiors were true to their materials, meaning that they didn’t hide the underlying structure of a furniture piece to make it pretty.

Our Bauhaus rug is inspired by the work of Anni Albers, a graduate and teacher of the Bauhaus school. Albers experimented with shape and color to produce textiles that were equally art and craft. The lamp is modeled after the MT8 or ‘Bauhaus Lamp.’ Its circular, cylindrical, and spherical parts create geometric unity and can be built with minimal time and materials. This type of opaque lampshade had only previously been seen in industrial settings.”

Mid-Century Modern (1930 – today)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“The Mid-Century Modern movement emerged as a softer, suburban take on Modernism, integrating natural elements. Interior designers introduced rustic elements and freer use of color inspired by Scandinavian and Brazilian furniture trends. Materials such as rattan, bamboo, and wicker felt both natural and modern when brought into the living room in the form of chairs, mirrors, and trim.

Statement lighting remains a simple way to add pizzazz to a well-used family living room. The lampshade and standing lamp in our picture both borrow formal elements from Modernism and Bauhaus but have the playful look of repurposed outdoor tools. The bright mustard of the armchair and vases exemplify the common Mid-Century Modern technique of pairing muted neutrals with a saturated signature color.”

Postmodern (1978 – today)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“Postmodern design can trace its artistic influences from epoch-defining surrealist, Marcel Duchamp, to Pop Art’s crown jester, Andy Warhol, to the ambiguous Bad Taste of Jeff Koons. It all came together in the 1980s when designers threw off the shackles of Modernism and approached interiors with a sense of humor and the brash confidence we associate with the decade.

In a Postmodern living room, every piece is a talking piece – because each one has a double-meaning or visual joke to unpack. The arches in our image question classical ideals of form, both flattening and unflattening a traditionally austere shape with an optical illusion conjured by their irreverent color palette. The rug’s meaning is simpler. It adds a rock n’ roll feel with its vinyl record shape – a Warhol-like ironic celebration of late 20th-century materialism.”

Contemporary (1980s – today)

Image credits: HomeAdvisor

“A cluttered age calls for a pared-back living room. Today’s contemporary style borrows the clean lines of Modernism and the airy, outdoors feel of the Mid-Century Modern home. Interior designers in the late 2010s love to give a nod to Bauhaus by peeling away surfaces to show the materials at work. However, today’s cutting-edge building materials and textiles can sit happily alongside repurposed industrial features from past eras.

The smooth, bare floor and uncluttered walls of our contemporary living room create a typical sense of space and light. Abstract art on the walls prevents the area from feeling empty and draws out the subtle style of the otherwise minimalist surroundings. Observe, too, the use of line to draw your eye around, such as the horizontal central light, which is both extraordinary and very simple – and seems to widen and heighten the room.”

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Aušrys Uptas

One day this guy just kind of figured “I spend most of my time on the internet anyway, why not turn it into a profession?” – and he did! Now he not only gets to browse the latest cat videos and fresh memes every day but also shares them with people all over the world, making sure they stay up to date with everything that’s trending around the web. Something that always peeks his interests is old technology, literature and all sorts of odd vintage goodness so if you find something that’s too bizarre not to share, make sure to hit him up!

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Alessandro Mendini Puts His Own Work on Display in His Magical Italian Getaway

Legendary architect Alessandro Mendini fills his vibrant vacation home in the mountains of northern Italy with highlights from his illustrious career

Alessandro Mendini has a confession to make: “I never created furniture for a house of my own.” The 86-year-old Italian architect has long separated work and home, filling his humble Milan apartment—just upstairs from his atelier—with only simple, functional basics.

But 12 years ago, as Mendini looked for a vacation home outside the city to share with his two grown daughters, Fulvia and Elisa, a photo-graph of a beauty in the Stile Liberty mode (Italy’s term for Art Nouveau) caught his eye in a real-estate agent’s office. “I immediately loved it,” he recalls. A private residence that served for a time as a summer camp for children managed by nuns, it sat snugly in the mountains of Olda, a village north of San Pellegrino Terme. Soon, keys in hand, Mendini felt something change: “I put my own furniture on display as if it were a museum and positioned them next to Liberty-style antiques.”

The house makes me think, links me to the past, and detaches me for a few days from the speed of life and work.

 

With a wildly prolific career of more than 50 years and counting, there was a lot of material to choose from. Mendini’s affinity for environments began earlier than most. Born prematurely in Milan in 1931, he and his twin sister were placed along with a couple of hot-water bottles in a large, zigzag-patterned armchair designed by Piero Portaluppi (who also decorated the family house) and left to incubate. From that improvised cradle, an infant Mendini gazed up at the Annunciation, a Surrealistic artwork by Alberto Savinio. “That was my first habitat,” he once wrote. “A Tyrolean Futurist arm-chair and a metaphysical painting.”

 
The living room.

Alessandro Mendini in the living room. The armchair wears a proust fabric by the designer.

After he graduated from architecture school at Milan Polytechnic, Mendini’s career took off in wild and unprecedented directions. Critical of bourgeois culture, he moved within the late-1960s anti-design Italian Radical movement, from which he went on to cofound (along with luminary Ettore Sottsass) Studio Alchimia and later designed for Memphis (founded by Sottsass). All the while, he built buildings, penned books, and served as the editor of Domus and Casabella. Discerning as he is, he created not only objects of contemplation, but also ones for practical use—corkscrews for Alessi, watches for Swatch, and plastic stools for Kartell, among countless others—that tirelessly deliver his cheerful wit to the masses.

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Of his new home, Mendini says, “It allows me to experiment, especially with color.” Sweet pastels—calamine-pink; pistachio-green—splash the rooms, which are filled with Technicolor furnishings. Like so much of Mendini’s work, the juxtapositions are improbable, even jarring. As design dealer Didier Krzentowski of Paris’s Galerie Kreo, a longtime collaborator with the designer, puts it: “He will never do something that is not himself. He really has his own world.”

The star player of that world, of course, is Mendini’s unforgettable 1978 ode to French writer Marcel Proust: a baroque seat hand-painted with thousands of Pointillist brushstrokes. One of the limited-edition versions shares a sitting room with Fulvia. Two green plastic models produced by Magis—the design has been reimagined in dozens of materials ranging from marble to cast bronze—sit downstairs in the belvedere, and Pointillist spots sprinkle headboards, mirrors, and rugs all over the house.

Mendini’s own works (rare prototypes, wild cabinets, and charming rugs) mingle with those of his friends, such as a gelatinous vase by Gaetano Pesce and circus-like poufs by Anna Gili, as well as a table that she designed for the Memphis Group. And all that vibrant modernity sits with the Stile Liberty antiques that came with the house and a cache of other venerables—small tables, lamps by Émile Gallé and Tiffany, a few bronze sculptures—purchased at an auction of decorations from the nearby Grand Hotel.

“I do four things here,” Mendini says, reflecting on his new place of solitude. “I read, I write, I draw, and I take walks in the mountains. The house makes me think, links me to the past, and detaches me for a few days from the speed of life and work.” Thinking about the arc of Mendini’s lengthy (and still extremely active) career, the filmmaker Francesca Molteni—whose documentary about the architect debuted in 2016—laughs. “He said that he started his career as an anti-bourgeois designer, and he ended up being a bourgeois in the end,” she says. “But a good one.” And now, like every good bourgeois, Mendini has a country house, too.

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This Is Why Design Experts Are Flocking to Barcelona

It’s doubtful Antoni Gaudí ever contemplated the perfect selfie. But the Catalan architect’s dizzying oeuvre, a phantasmagoria of shapes and colors, makes taking one almost irresistible. On a recent sunny day in Barcelona, crowds clamored toward the mosaic walls of Park Güell, smiling for the camera. And all around town, arms stretched up to snap Gaudí’s unfinished Sagrada Família, an omnipresent masterpiece with melting façades and spires topped by hulking cranes. More than 135 years in the making, the basilica is now a decade away from completion—a milestone some thought might never come.

Continue reading This Is Why Design Experts Are Flocking to Barcelona

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