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Tag Archives: architecture

This Self-Sustaining Hotel In Norway’s Arctic Circle Claims It Will Be The World’s Most Environmentally Friendly Hotel

Snøhetta is without a doubt one of the most well-known architecture and interior design offices in Norway, if not the whole world. This time the architects, in collaboration with Arctic Adventures of Norway, Asplan Viak and Skanska, have designed the first energy positive hotel in Norway, at the foot of the Svartisen glacier, just above the Arctic circle.

They named the hotel ‘Svart’, meaning Black in Norwegian – inspired by the dark glaciers of Svartisen. “This will be the world’s most environmentally friendly hotel,” says architect Zenul Khan, one of the architects of Snøhetta. The hotel reduces its yearly energy consumption by approximately 85% compared to a modern hotel and on top of that, produces its own energy – a must in the precious arctic environment. “It was important for us to design a sustainable building that will leave a minimal environmental footprint on this beautiful Northern nature,” says Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, one of the Founding Partners at Snøhetta.

The design of Svart is unique too – thanks to it’s unique, circular form, the hotel will offer panoramic 360-degree views of the surrounding fjord and glacier. The architects say they took inspiration from traditional Norwegian fishing equipment and fishermen’s houses. The construction of the hotel started in 2017 and is planned to be finished in 2021.

Check out the cool renderings in the gallery below!

More info: SnøhettaSvart | Instagram | Facebook

The architects at Snøhetta have designed the first energy positive hotel in Norway, at the foot of the Svartisen glacier

They named the hotel ‘Svart’, meaning Black in Norwegian – inspired by the dark glaciers of Svartisen

The architects say they took inspiration from traditional Norwegian fishing equipment and fishermen’s houses

Thanks to it’s unique, circular form, the hotel will offer panoramic 360-degree views of the surrounding fjord and glacier

“This will be the world’s most environmentally friendly hotel,” says architect Zenul Khan

A look inside the glacier

Imagine seeing this view outside your hotel window!

Continue reading This Self-Sustaining Hotel In Norway’s Arctic Circle Claims It Will Be The World’s Most Environmentally Friendly Hotel

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Adorable Duo Travels The World To Play With Architecture

Spain-based duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devis love traveling and searching for interesting geometry in architecture. They photograph their adorable explorations and everything looks like straight out of an aesthetic fairytale.

Each photo also has an entertaining element of quirkiness. Daniel and Anna always find the funniest ways to ‘interact’ with the architecture in their shots, and it adds an additional amusing dimension to the already rich and fascinating images.

More info: Daniel’s Instagram | Anna’s Instagram

Copenhagen, Denmark

Valencia, Spain

Muralla Roja, Spain

Valencia, Spain

Copenhagen, Denmark

Valencia, Spain

Munich, Germany

Valencia, Spain

Riccione, Italy

Valencia, Spain

Strasbourg, France

Copenhagen, Denmark

Muralla Roja, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Valencia, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Munich, Germany

Valencia, Spain

Lisbon, Portugal

Munich, Germany

Dublin, Ireland

Continue reading Adorable Duo Travels The World To Play With Architecture

30 Times Building Inspectors Found The Weirdest Stuff During Structural Inspections

While most of us see buildings as nothing more than collections of pretty apartments, structural inspectors get to explore the unseen side of them – and it’s not pretty. Turns out the undersides of some buildings are full of hack jobs by amateur handymen and weird things like skulls and creepy dolls, that are just too bizarre not to share. That’s why structural inspector Derek Marier and his co-workers at Alpha Structural, Inc. upload their weirdest findings to Imgur for everyone to look at.

In a recent interview with Bored Panda, Derek said coming across weird stuff can shake you up at first. “I would have to say the skull gave me the biggest chills by far. I assumed that it was fake right from the start, but I didn’t realize that I picked up an actual skull from Peru which was estimated at being 1,000+ years old,” said the man. Another thing that put more scared the inspector more than the creepy items was a man-made tunnel dug under a building’s foundation. “I’ve heard horror stories of people getting trapped under houses by attempting to squirm through those gaps,” said Derek. “That’s a nightmare in itself. Thank the lord there was no scary doll or human skull staring me in the face while I was attempting to crawl through!”

When Derek stumbles upon something weird, he informs the homeowners and in some cases even the authorities if things seem odd, like the time he found the skull. He says that not all homeowners are even aware of the things lurking under their homes. “In the case of the skull, the owners didn’t know it was there. The previous owners brought it back some time in the 70s or 80s and just threw it under the home,” said the man. “They were just as surprised to see it as I was!”

Check out all of the creepy dolls, tribal statues, and Mickey Mouse jobs found during structural inspections in the gallery below!

More info: AlphaStructural.com | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

#1

Image source: AlphaStructural

This subterranean basement had a window that opened up into an open area underground. Imagine opening the window in your basement and a group of bats fly in. That probably wouldn’t happen here but it’s possible! This is a great spot for putting your disobedient kids.

#2

Image source: AlphaStructural

We are doing a seismic retrofit on this apartment building and our crew took off the bottom portion of stucco on this column to expose the column connections. This is, quite literally, what we discovered. There was nothing supporting the unit above. No connections or even anything touching the ground besides the stucco facade. Thank goodness we had shoring put in place.

#3

Image source: AlphaStructural

We discovered this REAL skull while doing a foundation inspection on a property in LA. The authorities were called and it was discovered that the skull was in fact real and that the previous owners brought it back from Peru in the 70s or 80s. There wasn’t any TSA agents to stop them from bringing it back, and when it came time to sell the property they threw it under the home.

#4

Image source: AlphaStructural

One of the worst structural cracks we’ve ever seen. The entire back side of the home was sinking down and pulling away from the rest of the structure. A knock down if you ask me.

#5

Image source: AlphaStructural

This was brand new, 2019 construction and this is what they do. How lazy can people get, you ask? This lazy.

#6

Image source: AlphaStructural

This is an old septic well covered up under a parking space of an apartment building. It’s about a century old but was still in decent shape.

#7

Image source: AlphaStructural

Found this Nkondi while doing an inspection. Nkondi are statues made by tribes of the Congo. They can mean many things but are often said to hold a spirit which hunts down bad people and wrong-doers.

#8

Image source: AlphaStructural

Whoever did this has quite the sense of humor, but lacks the proper funds.Mickey Mouse Job: A job done incorrectly in an extremely poor manner using the simplest, easiest, cheapest and fastest way possible.

#9

Image source: AlphaStructural

What seems to be the issue?

#10

Image source: AlphaStructural

Another extremely creepy doll which had no reason to be where it was.

#11

Image source: AlphaStructural

At least they braced it, but still a total mickey mouse job.

#12

Image source: AlphaStructural

If you wanted a visual representation of what evil looks like, this is it. And the brick foundation is in really bad shape…

#13

Image source: AlphaStructural

Almost stepped on this during an inspection but I decided not too. He looked like a fungi. Ha.

#14

Image source: AlphaStructural

Here’s a few post and piers under the same house that are also clearly leaning quite a bit.

#15

Image source: AlphaStructural

If you have foundation issues, your internal cracking should resemble this. Large, diagonal cracking. Though, this was a pretty severe case.

#16

Image source: AlphaStructural

This is a wooden column which is currently the main support for an apartment unit above. Moisture has basically eaten away the bottom of the column, rendering it pretty useless. We’re currently doing an earthquake retrofit for this building and will soon be replacing this column with steel. Would you feel safe if your unit was being help up by this column? I wouldn’t.

#17

Image source: AlphaStructural

Slab crack to the max… At times homeowners can be overly concerned about cracking in their homes. However, this type of cracking is definitely a cause for concern…

#18

Image source: AlphaStructural

RIP.

#19

Image source: AlphaStructural

Grab some 2x4s and a little DIY creativity and you have yourself a recipe for mickey mouse work.
Always remember, doing the cheapest repair is the best route to go no matter what!

(Please do not take that seriously!!)

#20

Image source: AlphaStructural

This was a front porch that had been sinking a few inches over a short time. This created some separation from the columns that help support the roof above (as most porches in LA connect directly to a portion of the roof). You can see that they added a large post to the right of the column so it would help with supporting the weight-load from above. Scary stuff!

#21

Image source: AlphaStructural

There’s 11 different pieces of wood connecting to each other in this photo.

#22

Image source: AlphaStructural

This was a wooden retaining wall with a stone facade on the front. Over a short time, the hillside began to erode and the dirt started coming down the slope. This caused the retaining wall below to pull away and lean downward, taking parts of the facade with it. Don’t use wood for retaining walls. They can be used for compacted and tiered hillsides, but not full on retaining walls.

#23

Image source: AlphaStructural

Here we have a decent sized sink hole we inspected this week. From the top it doesn’t look too bad… But once you poke your head inside, it gets a little more serious. The hole is a little over 7 feet deep and 5-6 feet wide. You can see that there are some very large tree roots in the background. The fact that these are exposed is a sort of blessing in disguise. They do help stabilize the surrounding area but it’s still at risk of expanding. We proposed a exploratory investigation to see exactly what’s going on and what’s causing this too occur. I’ll also add that it’s only a few feet from the home’s foundation and could create some serious structural issues if left without being properly handled.

#24

Image source: AlphaStructural

This is just like Tetris when you try to flip your piece at the last second and it offsets everything. 🙁

#25

Image source: AlphaStructural

We inspected this old porte-cochère that had been slowly sinking and displacing over time. You can see that the deck at the top is clearly sloping down a few inches.

#26

Image source: AlphaStructural

Gottem again!

#27

Image source: AlphaStructural

So close.

#28

Image source: AlphaStructural

Termite damage and dry rot do not go well together. Notice he’s using a flashlight to crumble the wood to pieces.

#29

Image source: AlphaStructural

Here’s an old girder that’s been split in half. We tried finding the missing piece but it was nowhere to be found and the cause isn’t really known either.

#30

Image source: AlphaStructural

This is what happens when an internal load-bearing wall doesn’t have a sufficient supporting foundation beneath it. Notice the slope toward the wall.

Continue reading 30 Times Building Inspectors Found The Weirdest Stuff During Structural Inspections

These Circle Gardens In Denmark Look Almost Too Perfect To Be Real

There’s no better feeling than escaping to nature after a hard week of working. And what better place to escape to than your own personal tiny garden home. The Brøndby Haveby or Brøndby Garden City is a small community located just a short drive from Copenhagen, Denmark. What sets it apart from any other garden community out there is its unique shape. The houses are arranged in a circular pattern and look absolutely surreal when viewed from above.

More info: Instagram

Image credits: henry_do

Photographer Henry Do has recently captured these amazing drone photos of the community and the look absolutely stunning.

Image credits: henry_do

The Brøndby Haveby houses are the perfect place to run away from the bustling city – the large yards mean plenty of room for activities and the tall hedges ensure your privacy.

Image credits: Google Earth

The municipality of Brøndby approved the idea of this “garden city” over 50 years ago, back in 1964, and the circles began popping up one by one.

Image credits: Google Earth

This specific arrangement wasn’t chosen by accident. The architect that designed the “garden city” said that the idea behind the circles was to increase social interaction among the renters.

Image credits: Google Earth

When viewed from above, the circle gardens look even more surreal. They kind of look like grapes on a vine, don’t they?

Image credits: Google Earth

Here’s what people had to say about the Brøndby Haveby








Continue reading These Circle Gardens In Denmark Look Almost Too Perfect To Be Real

This Self-Sustaining Hotel In Norway’s Arctic Circle Claims It Will Be The World’s Most Environmentally Friendly Hotel

Snøhetta is without a doubt one of the most well-known architecture and interior design offices in Norway, if not the whole world. This time the architects, in collaboration with Arctic Adventures of Norway, Asplan Viak and Skanska, have designed the first energy positive hotel in Norway, at the foot of the Svartisen glacier, just above the Arctic circle.

They named the hotel ‘Svart’, meaning Black in Norwegian – inspired by the dark glaciers of Svartisen. “This will be the world’s most environmentally friendly hotel,” says architect Zenul Khan, one of the architects of Snøhetta. The hotel reduces its yearly energy consumption by approximately 85% compared to a modern hotel and on top of that, produces its own energy – a must in the precious arctic environment. “It was important for us to design a sustainable building that will leave a minimal environmental footprint on this beautiful Northern nature,” says Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, one of the Founding Partners at Snøhetta.

The design of Svart is unique too – thanks to it’s unique, circular form, the hotel will offer panoramic 360-degree views of the surrounding fjord and glacier. The architects say they took inspiration from traditional Norwegian fishing equipment and fishermen’s houses. The construction of the hotel started in 2017 and is planned to be finished in 2021.

Check out the cool renderings in the gallery below!

More info: SnøhettaSvart | Instagram | Facebook

The architects at Snøhetta have designed the first energy positive hotel in Norway, at the foot of the Svartisen glacier

They named the hotel ‘Svart’, meaning Black in Norwegian – inspired by the dark glaciers of Svartisen

The architects say they took inspiration from traditional Norwegian fishing equipment and fishermen’s houses

Thanks to it’s unique, circular form, the hotel will offer panoramic 360-degree views of the surrounding fjord and glacier

“This will be the world’s most environmentally friendly hotel,” says architect Zenul Khan

A look inside the glacier

Imagine seeing this view outside your hotel window!

Continue reading This Self-Sustaining Hotel In Norway’s Arctic Circle Claims It Will Be The World’s Most Environmentally Friendly Hotel

Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

When the Apollo 11 came to rest in the lunar Sea of Tranquility on July 20th, 1969 and began transmitting back to Earth grainy black-and-white images of a spider-legged ship, pale figures within shiny helmets, and, a bit later, magisterial photographs of Earth itself against the black void of space, the human race’s conception of itself changed forever. The voyage inspired political realignments and countless scientific breakthroughs; it also inspired the look and feel of a number of cultural masterpieces, from Brian Eno’s 1983 ambient classic Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks to Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1971 stark sci-fi epic Solaris.

Architecture and design took that giant leap for mankind along with Neil Armstrong. In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing, we spoke to innovators in the industry about their own lunar inspirations.

Enter the Best of Year Awards by September 20
Perilune by Suzanne Tick for Luum Textiles. Photography courtesy of Luum Textiles.

Suzanne Tick, creative director, Luum Textiles

As a child, the textile designer Suzanne Tick watched the landing from her home in Bloomington, Illinois. “What was riveting to me was the sound of someone on the moon and his buoyancy,” Tick says. “I had this realization that a person can be on the moon while I’m sitting at home and he could also be floating!” Since then, the moon has been an important force in her life. “I’ve lived by the MoMA Moon Charts and they have played a large part in my consciousness. A poignant time in my life was 2009, 2010, and 2011 which coincided with the last three years of my father’s life, my marriage, and my son living with me. For this reason, I wove a triptych of each of these years and sewed them together as a reminder of that shift in my life.” This design became Perilune, a printed polyurethane which was introduced through Luum.

Long Dock Park in Beacon, New York by Gary R. Hilderbrand. Photography by James Ewing.

Gary R. Hilderbrand, FASLA FAAR; principal, Reed Hilderbrand; Peter Louis Hornbeck Professor in Practice, Harvard Graduate School of Design

“Because my Aunt and grandmother had a large color TV, anything momentous like this we watched in their living room,” says Gary Hilderbrand. “All gathered ‘round for the moon landing. It’s singed on my brain.” The landscape architect would go on to transform a brownfield in Beacon, New York, into a waterfront parkland with site-specific work by artist George Trakas and two buildings by ARO. “Apollo amplified my instincts about knowing our place in the world and a sense that we somehow had technological knowledge to improve it,” he says. “Seeing these missions orbiting around the other side of the moon, and then exploring its surface, gave me hope that we could right our own environmental mess and craft a smarter, saner landscape. That way of seeing the Earth descended directly from the Apollo 8 ‘earthrise’ photograph. Who would not be affected by that image?!”

SiriusXM’s New York Headquarters and Broadcast Center by Michael Kostow. Photography by Adrian Wilson.

Michael Kostow, founding principal, Kostow Greenwood Architects

Satellite radio wouldn’t exist without the technological breakthroughs of the Apollo mission, so it made perfect sense to have a space fan design the headquarters for one of its largest players, SiriusXM. “I watched the moon landing as a youngster and even had early aspirations of becoming an astronaut,” says Michael Kostow. “I later wanted to design space vehicles for NASA, would build and fly multi-stage model rockets, and even as an architecture graduate student had an early morning ‘party’ to drink Tang and watch the first launch of the space station with my classmates.” The compact efficiency of the capsules influenced his plan for the satellite broadcasting company: “We wanted to invoke simplicity and timelessness,” he says, “and allow the empty space to be an active player in setting the mood.” Mission accomplished.

Aerial and Half-Moon by Kelly Harris Smith for Skyline Design. Photography courtesy of Skyline Design.

Kelly Harris Smith, designer and creative director, Kelly Harris Smith

“I’ve never been on a rocket ship,” says designer Kelly Harris Smith, “but I have flown on an airplane and to this day I always request a window seat so I can peek out over the landscape.” The designer was born after the moon landing but carries the legacy of an aerial point of view into a collection for Chicago’s Skyline Design of glass panels with systems of micro-patterns within shapes and gradations of color over larger repeats. “It’s rooted in looking at the familiar in a new way,” she says, “which I have to imagine is what all astronauts experience looking back at Earth.”

Draper, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Photography by Mark Flannery.

Elizabeth Lowrey, principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects

“Watching the moon landing, even at such a young age, I was awed by the realization that anything is possible,” says Elizabeth Lowrey—even growing up to design a new home for Draper, a not-for-profit engineering firm that created software for Apollo 11. “I remember, as we stepped into Draper’s lobby, the first thing we saw was a space shuttle model.  Even more thrilling was the opportunity to meet Margaret Hamilton, the pioneering software engineer who had made the moon landing possible!” A glass and steel structure forms the roof of the Draper atrium, which is rung with seven floors of offices and laboratories connected by blue glass vertical and horizontal stairways, green walls, and “the Cloud,” a polished steel polyhedron that is truly out of this world.

On the Water/Palisade Bay, New York City. Photography courtesy of ARO.

Adam Yarinsky, FAIA LEED AP, principal, Architecture Research Office

“I was seven, I remember watching the feed of the moonwalk,” says ARO co-founder Adam Yarinksy. “And if you were a kid that was into building models, you had the plastic model kit that was black and white with USA in red on the side. I built a model of the Saturn V and the lunar and command and service modules. The purposefulness of the vehicle had a kind of directness when you compare it to technology today. The control panels were just rows and rows of switches that all looked the same. There was a kind of Dieter Rams quality to it.” But it was politics, not aesthetics, that really inspired Yarinsky’s work with ARO, including this vision of the upper harbor of New York and New Jersey which proposes archipelago and wetlands to mitigate rising sea levels and storm surges. “The finite nature of the planet we’re on reinforces the notion that architecture is part of this web of relationships,” he says. “The best architecture tries to modify and transform, but it’s not an autonomous thing. It’s linked. That sense of connection is the legacy.”

Continue reading Six Industry Innovators Share Their Inspirations from the Lunar Landing

A quick refresher on architecture’s continuing battle with earthquakes

Antonio Pacheco

Jul 9, ’19 12:45 PM EST
View of damage following the 1994 Northridge earthquake that struck Los Angeles. Image courtesy of FEMA.

View of damage following the 1994 Northridge earthquake that struck Los Angeles. Image courtesy of FEMA.

With earthquakes in the news following a pair of recent tremors in California, it’s important to remember that seismic design is an integral and increasingly complex aspect of building design architects work hard to address. An ever-improving standard, seismic codes not only save lives, but also help to shape the built environment, and in places like California, play a large role in terms of building design, overall. 

Below is a round-up of some of Archinect’s recent earthquake-related coverage.

Changing seismic codes and other earthquake-related issues are currently coming online in many American cities, including in Seattle, where new seismic standards for tall buildings have prompted worries about the safety of certain types of existing buildings. 

Seattle boosts seismic construction standards for new skyscrapers, but older high-rises are biggest concern

In San Francisco, seismic concerns run deeper than meets the eye. There, much of the city’s downtown is built atop landfill areas prone to liquefaction, with many of the city’s tallest buildings designed with obsolete structural designs. 

italy
The town center of Amatrice in Italy was destroyed during a 2016 earthquake. Image courtesy of Leggier il Firenzepost.

Are San Francisco skyscrapers prepared for the next big earthquake?

Los Angeles, meanwhile, has embarked on a long-term plan to retrofit its massive stock of “soft-story” structures, buildings that are constructed without enough shear wall protection and are therefore likely to collapse whenever the “Big One” strikes. 

Twenty-four years after the Northridge quake, Los Angeles still has thousands of ‘soft-story’ buildings to retrofit

As part of a ten year plan, the Los Angeles City Council agreed to allow landlords and tenants of the city’s 15,000 soft-story apartment complexes to share the costs for upgrading the structures. 

In Los Angeles, landlords and tenants will share seismic retrofit costs

Internationally, earthquakes have wrought extensive damage to many regions over the last decade, including in Taiwan, where a 6.4-magnitude earthquake toppled many buildings and killed hundreds of people in 2018.  

Five buildings tilt dangerously after magnitude 6.4 Taiwan quake

In Italy, architect Renzo Piano was called upon by the national government to help develop a plan for reconstruction efforts following a disastrous 2016 earthquake.

mexico
Faulty seismic design resulted in the collapse of many buildings during a 2017 earthquake that hit Mexico City and Puebla. Image courtesy of Wikimedia user AntoFran.

In wake of deadly earthquake, Italy’s prime minister calls on Renzo Piano to help reconstruction effort

In Chile, meanwhile, the country’s strict building codes helped reduce earthquake casualties during a sizable 2015 earthquake. 

 How Chile’s strict building codes help reduce the country’s earthquake casualties

A 2017 earthquake that hit Mexico City prompted some soul-searching in California, where thousands of existing concrete frame buildings, like many of those damaged in the Mexico City quake, await retrofitting despite the existence of new, more stringent seismic codes. 

Mexico Earthquake reminds that California architecture is vulnerable, with 1,500 at-risk buildings in LA

This is just a small sample of how the design of seismic codes is being felt around the world’s earthquake-prone regions. Not only can adequate seismic design and proper retrofitting be a matter of life and death during a seismic event, its one area of design where architects can have a profound impact on the health and safety of the people who occupy the buildings they design. 

Stay tuned for more coverage of the changing nature of seismic codes. 

Continue reading A quick refresher on architecture’s continuing battle with earthquakes

Living in a cloud: What nanotech means for architecture and the built environment

Could there come a time when buildings will become less about bricks and mortar and feel more like mists or fogs?

JULY 02, 2019 |

Last month, I wrote about how automation and AI are dramatically changing all four fundamental relationships between buildings and machines. For example, nanotechnology, which manipulates individual atoms and molecules to assemble things, could make the modernist metaphor of a “machine for living in” into reality, since the building would actually be composed of many tiny machines.

In fact, that’s not quite accurate. The definition of “machine” is “an apparatus using or applying mechanical power and having several parts, each with a definite function and together performing a particular task.” 

So machines are made of distinct parts, cobbled together to fulfill a function. They are characterized by their composition, as assemblages of singular bits and pieces in which the whole is greater than the sum.

 

SEE ALSO: Assessing AI’s impact on the AEC profession and the built environment

 

But nanotech will completely change this. When entire buildings can be shaped from microscopic components, the visible distinction between the individual parts will evaporate. A structure built from invisible machines will not appear to be a machine at all, since it no longer will be perceived as an assembly of parts. An edifice made of congealed cybernetic butter will look to be all whole, no parts. The very concept of a “building” could become meaningless, since it will no longer be “built” in any traditional way. 

Remember “Terminator 2”? Arnold Schwarzenegger’s T-800 is a machine: steel and servos wrapped in human skin. Robert Patrick’s T-1000 is made of liquid metal (“mimetic polyalloy”). He’s like sentient mercury, morphing into any shape he needs. A nanotech building (“nanotecture”?) would make conventional structures seem like Robby the Robot (of “Forbidden Planet” fame).

Buttery buildings could change everything we think and know about architecture. Frank Lloyd Wright felt that architectural form should stem from the inherent “nature” of its materials: “Each material speaks a language of its own.” In his mind, the proportions, heft, and texture of brick logically translated into structures such as the Robie House, which extends horizontally and hugs the land. But when the constituent parts of a building are too small to be seen with the naked eye, the relationships between form and materials will change. What is the “language” of a nanobot?

Because the character of a building could vary upon command—hard and opaque one minute, soft and transparent the next—the fabric of buildings could become fluid, fluctuating states from solid to liquid to gas and back. The notion of truth in materials will become irrelevant. In fact, the word material could go away. When the basic building blocks of architecture have no strict definition, structure and substance could separate. Matter may not matter.

Could there come a time when buildings will become less about bricks and mortar and feel more like mists or fogs, vaguely enveloping space in ways we can barely picture now? What will it be like to live in a cloud?

Lance Hosey, FAIA, LEED Fellow, is a Design Director with Gensler. His book, The Shape of Green: Aesthetics, Ecology, and Design, has been an Amazon #1 bestseller in the Sustainability & Green Design category.

Continue reading Living in a cloud: What nanotech means for architecture and the built environment

Speak At A’20

Welcome to the proposal submission site!

We’re developing an incredible education program for A’20 and we’d love your help. We’re accepting proposals for A’20 educational sessions now through August 5, 2019.

A’20 Workshops a separate call
The submission process preconference workshop is now a separate call. If you’re interested in submitting a half-day or full-day workshop proposal, please visit the call for preconference workshops website.

Speaker benefits
All confirmed A’20 speakers will receive a 30% discount on early bird conference registration. We’ll share details about how to use the discount after registration opens in January 2020. This benefit applies to confirmed speakers only. It does not apply to session organizers unless your session organizer is also a confirmed speaker.

What’s behind a winning proposal?
Attendees consistently rate our speakers as a top conference highlight. Your proposal should show how you’ll create an experience that inspires and empowers; features interactive, engaging learning; and showcases emerging trends and innovations.

During the Phase 1 review, we’ll evaluate how well your proposal fit into one of our four learning experience lenses, reflect emerging trends and new ideas, and engaging learning in support of our curricular framework. In particular, we’re interested in proposals for sessions that are 30, 60 and 90 minutes long and appropriate for intermediate, advanced, and expert knowledge levels.

Proposals that advance to Phase 2 will be evaluated for learner outcomes, speaker expertise, attendee value, and 2019 speaker evaluations (where applicable).

We’ll provide feedback on every proposal at each phase of the submission process.

How to submit
Log in below to get started. Update your proposal anytime until the deadline, August 5, 2019, 11:59pm EST. Need inspiration? Check out 2019 schedule.

Resources
For an overview of the conference education program and the submission process, please visit the AIA CES A’20 Call for Proposals Resources page.

Questions & technical support
Contact us at education@conferenceonarchitecture.com. If you need technical support for your submission, please call (410) 638 9239 or (877) 426 6323.

Dates to remember

  • August 5: Phase 1 proposal submissions closes at 11:59pm EST
  • September 20: Notification of acceptance into Phase 2
  • October 21: Phase 2 submissions due by 11:59pm EST
  • December 13: Notification of final acceptance

Log in to the Abstract ScoreCard

Questions? Organizer: Jamie Yeung –

/

  • (202) 626-7529

Continue reading Speak At A’20

London’s ‘Color Palace’ is the jolt of energy architecture needs

The installation celebrates vibrant Nigerian textiles and experimental engineering

colorful installation in LondonAdam Scott

In the textile markets of Lagos, Nigeria, bolts of vividly hued fabric are stacked far as the eye can see. They’re often neatly wrapped, waiting for shoppers to unfurl them and reveal their vibrant geometric patterns. These markets inspired the Color Palace, a new pavilion British-Nigerian designer Yinka Ilori and the firm Pricegorecreated for the London Festival of Architecture and Dulwich Picture Gallery.

colorful installation in LondonAdam Scott

The temporary pavilion is an enormous, prismatic slatted cube raised on four stocky red columns that are actually old drainage pipes. The cube’s space frame is composed of wood battens that are all the exact same size. Ilori painted a geometric motif on the facade, with each batten receiving a different color on each side.

This yields an optical illusion: Walking around the pavilion makes it appear like the colors morph, like a lenticular print. When visitors ascend a magenta staircase, they’re totally immersed in the structure and can see, up close, how everything is assembled.

Adam Scott
Adam Scott

“[The pavilion’s] patterns and shapes calmly welcome you from a distance until you get closer and closer, and you’re blown away with an explosion of color that immediately demands your attention,” Ilori said in a news release.

Ilori is best known for designing upcycled furniture, which he paints with bold colors and reupholsters with Nigerian fabrics to symbolize traditional parables. The Color Palace extends that sensibility to a much greater scale that allows him to communicate with people in a more immersive way.

Adam Scott

“The beauty of working on a larger scale is that I am able to tell a more powerful and compelling narrative, allowing the audience to interact and engage with the structure externally and internally,” Ilori tells Curbed.

“Color Palace” is the a jolt of energy architecture needs: It’s a compelling installation that’s both culturally specific and universally expressive, and invites people to learn more about creative engineering techniques. The pavilion is the antithesis of unapproachable, stark, white cubes that have come to be the stereotype of modern architecture—and it’s invigorating.

Continue reading London’s ‘Color Palace’ is the jolt of energy architecture needs

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