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Tag Archives: Anna Gibertini

Lori Weitzner x Artistic Tile Collaboration Wows at HD Expo

An example space featuring the Forest pattern in the Whisper colorway. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

Collaboration is the name of the game in today’s design industry. Pairing the inspired sensibilities of a big-name designer with a manufacturer whose technical capabilities can realize their vision has resulted in some stunning products over the years. It’s also highlighted the robust abilities of manufacturers to not only fabricate product, but act as talented design partners in the creative process.

The latest iteration of this trend can be found at HD Expo, where Artistic Tile unveiled two new collections made in collaboration with award-winning textile designer Lori Weitzner. Designed specifically for interior vertical surfaces, the Lori Weitzner x Artistic Tile Collaboration features two organic patterns, River and Forest, that originated at Weitzner’s White Box Sanctuary Studio.

Read more: Kohler’s WasteLAB’s Crackle Line with Ann Sacks Breaks the Mold 

The River pattern in the Night Shadows colorway. This look is rendered in China Black marble. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

“When Artistic Tile first proposed this collaboration, I knew our studio could bring something to them that they didn’t currently have in their portfolio,” explains Weitzner. “Organic, textural looks are something that our studio does very well. For Forest and River, we created a lot of preliminary looks through painting, drawing, and paper folding. Then we worked with Artistic Tile to narrow down the selection.”

In exchange for her substantial expertise in creating earthy, tactile patterns with textiles, Artistic Tile opened up a whole new world of materials for Weitzner to discover. “I had no idea there were so many different kinds of stones in world—it was an eye-opening experience for me,” says Weitzner. “Because I didn’t have much knowledge of what was actually possible to create with stone, I could really push the envelope in terms of coming up with patterns. The exceptional design team at Artistic Tile would then say ‘Oh we can’t do that, but maybe we could try this.’ Everyone really benefitted from working and exploring together.”

The Forest pattern in the Whisper colorway. This look is rendered in Bianco Carrara marble. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

When it came time to select colorways, Weitzner and Artistic Tile settled on three varieties of marble in black and white tones. “Sometimes people don’t think of whites and blacks as colors but they absolutely are,” says Weitzner. “We selected whites and blacks that create mood and easily serve as backdrops to other colors, but aren’t dead.”

The Whisper palette utilizes Bardiglio Nuvolato and Bianco Carrara marbles. The lightness of these stones creates an ambiance of calm, quiet, and sanctuary. On the opposite end, the Night Shadows palette veers towards a masculine, urban sophistication rendered in China Black marble.

Both River and Forest are available now for specification. 

Watch now: Product Insight: ExCinere by Dzek in Collaboration with Formafantasma

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John Edelman Steps Down As CEO of Design Within Reach

Interior Design‘s Cindy Allen and John Edelman. Photography by Ben Meyers.

Design Within Reach (DWR) has announced that its CEO, John Edelman, will be stepping down from his position, effective June 14. He will eventually transition to become the Chairman of the Board of DWR and Herman Miller Consumer. His longtime business partner of 27 years, John McPhee, will stay on as the company’s president. 

Edelman’s design-centric career began in the 1990s, when he joined his brother Sam at his shoe company Sam & Libby. He eventually left to assist his design luminary parents, Teddy and Arthur Edelman, with their business. He became president of the brand in 2001 and eventually sold the iconic leather company to Knoll for $67 million in 2007. It was in 2010 that DWR serendipitously came calling. 

In just four years, Edelman and McPhee brought the company back from death. “It was on the verge of bankruptcy when we took it on,” Edelman recalled. “By 2014, we doubled the size of the business and halved the number of stores down to 35. The company became incredibly profitable.” 

The natural next step to assure DWR’s continued rousing success was to find a partner whose aesthetic would naturally complement DWR’s modernist approach and business acumen would propel the brand to new heights. And that partner was Herman Miller. “With this partnership, we assured the longevity of our brand and formed an indelible link with one of the most prestigious design companies in the world,” Edelman said. 

Read more: Herman Miller Agrees to Aquire Design Within Reach

With this powerhouse behind DWR, it could start on the work that it’s become famous for: partnering and promoting some of the most exciting brands in the industry. Even just a small, hand-picked selection of names are quite impressive: Hay, Moooi, J.L. Møllers, Brown Jordan, Luceplan, and Gloster. “I’m so proud of all the amazing designers and manufacturers we’ve worked with,” said Edelman. “DWR played such a large role in making modern design mainstream through the designers we chose to partner with and the more than 10 million catalogs we sent out that contain their stories. We helped break them out of the sheltered world of interior design and into the vast consumer market.”

When asked what’s changed the most in the past nine years, Edelman points to the rise of the Internet and E-commerce. The advent of Pinterest, Instagram, and easy access to designers through websites and email has made it easier for the consumer to become passionate and educated about design. The one thing that Edelman believes hasn’t changed? The enduring excellence of modernist aesthetics. “Modern isn’t a trend. It’s forever,” he noted. 

As for his future, Edelman continued: “It’s been an incredible 20 years being a part of this industry, but I’ve been on a plane nearly every other week since 1988. I plan to take a little time off, but I’m not leaving forever. There’s still so much to see and do with design.” 

Read more: Jens Risom Sketches Are Brought to Life in Design With Reach’s Block Island Collection

Studio INI Debuts Kinetic Installation for NYCxDesign

Photography by Luke Walker, courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

 

If the Shed has proved anything, it’s that kinetic architecture is here to stay in a big way. Of course, one could argue that the DS+R and Rockwell Group behemoth is hardly the first project to feature large-scale, moveable external elements, but it is the first to tackle the concept at the grandiose scale that an urban environment like New York demands. What’s more, the Shed’s sliding shell is unique in that its movements are determined by an individual artist’s desires for the space. The artist’s subjective ability to shape the institution’s size and form at whim introduces an intriguing notion about the future of urban architecture. Will responsive architecture be the city’s new paradigm? As we grow more and more accustomed to hyper-personalized digital spaces, will we naturally demand the same of the physical realm?

Photography by Luke Walker, courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

 

A new installation from Studio INI mediates on these questions, albeit at a much smaller scale. Located at A/D/O by MINI’s outdoor courtyard, founder Nassia Inglessis’s debuts her first U.S. kinetic installation, Urban Imprint, to start a dialogue about architecture’s ability to mediate our need for personal expression in a static urban environment. Visitors are able to physically reshape Urban Imprint by simply walking over the installation’s steel-spring-supported floor. With each footfall, a series of pulleys is activated, physically lifting Urban Imprint’s ceiling away from the viewer’s head. The effect results in an undulating, cocoonlike installation that responds to a viewer’s movement, form, and choices.

Read more: 10 Questions With… Nassia Inglessis

Photography by Luke Walker, courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

“In cities, we are so often adapting to the physical constraints of a predefined plan, as if poured into a vessel of concrete and glass” Inglessis explains. “I wanted to explore what it would look like to create a more symbiotic and natural relationship between us and our built environment. The goal of Urban Imprint is to explore the potential of a highly responsive urban space; one that I hope can allow its visitors to feel present and empowered through their own unique imprint.”

Photography by Luke Walker, courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

 

Urban Imprint also exemplifies Studio INI’s fascination with digital tools and unique material techniques. The steel-spring floor was made with computation design and digital fabrication tools, such as laser cutting. The pliable yet sturdy skin was produced through a combination of concrete and rubber. She explored these same concepts in a more linear format with her London Design Biennale 2018 installation, Disobedience. That work consisted of a 56-foot-long corridor with CNC-cut, recycled plastic walls that flexed and morphed around a moving human body.

Read more: Studio INI Creates Breathing Walls for London Design Biennale

Designer Nassia Inglessis constructing Urban Imprint. Photography courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

The location for the installation’s NYCxDesign debut feels especially appropriate, considering A/D/O’s design-centered mission statement and its 2018 NYCxDesign exhibition, United Visual Artists’ Spirit of the City.

“We are thrilled to be working with Studio INI and giving the work of Nassia Inglessis a platform during New York’s most important design week,” A/D/O’s global managing director Nate Pinsley says. “Her vision is one that uses technology as a tool to enhance our humanity. Our programming has always aimed to inspire debate about the future of design and we could not imagine a more perfect partner.”

Photography by Luke Walker, courtesy of A/D/O by MINI.

Urban Imprint is free and open to the public. It will remain open at A/D/O until September 2, 2019. Check out Urban Imprint’s website for events, press, and visitor information. 

> See our full coverage of NYCxDESIGN 2019

NYCxDESIGN Awards Celebrate the City’s Best Products and Projects for Fourth Year

On Monday, May 20th, more than 700 guests gathered at Pier 17 in Lower Manhattan to once again celebrate the winners of the fourth annual NYCxDESIGN Awards, presented by Interior Design and ICFF. By now, NYCxDESIGN needs no introduction—the overwhelmingly popular design festival attracted more than 347,000 attendees and sponsored over 400 events in all five boroughs in 2018. The NYCxDESIGN Awards extol the best projects and products that were either created or shown in New York City this year.

> Watch highlights from the event

The award for honorees. Photography by Christopher P Ernst.

After a few brief introductory comments by the NYCEDC’s CMO Edward Hogikyan and ICFF director Kevin O’Keefe, Interior Design Editor in Chief Cindy Allen resumed her duties as M.C. of the event. This year she had over 200 finalists in the products category to announce, as well as  over 100 projects. Winners of each respective category were awarded with the highly-coveted Lladró Guest figurine. 

NYCXDESIGN attendees toast to another inspiring awards ceremony. Photography by Matthew Carasella.

 

The awards ceremony started with product winners, which included the Vettis™ concrete bath fitting collection from Brizo, Astek’s ceramics-inspired Re-Glazed wallcovering collection with interior designer Jeff Andrews, and Buoyant NYC’s quartz and onyx stone DELLA Sconce. Project winners included the Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group behemoth, The Shed; Chelsea’s newest speakeasy, The 18th Room, by West Chin Architects; and the Glossier NYC Flagship store by Gachot Studios. 

Editor in Chief Cindy Allen announcing winners to a packed house. Photography by Matthew Carasella.

View the slideshow to see highlights from the event >>

View the full list of winners and honorees >>

A big thank you to all of our NYCXDESIGN Award partners:

Continue reading NYCxDESIGN Awards Celebrate the City’s Best Products and Projects for Fourth Year

A New Solution for Open Office Shelving

Photography courtesy of Loftwall.

When it comes to demarcating and optimizing space, the open office can present boundless opportunities and unavoidable challenges. Shelving systems are an obvious solution to the conundrum because they provide both a place to store items and a solid object that can be used to break up the visual expansiveness of an open layout. What frequently happens, however, is that these shelving systems create poor lines of sight and contribute to visual clutter.

Shift makes its ICFF 2019 debut. Photography courtesy of Loftwall.

Well, there’s a solution for that problem, too, and it comes courtesy of Dallas-based modular divider manufacturer Loftwall. Over the course of a cross-country research trip across North America, the brand learned what exactly designers need to create the most efficient and stylish open offices for their clients.

Photography courtesy of Loftwall.

“We spent a lot of time trying to understand how people packed functionality into their spaces,” explains Bryce Stuckenschneider, Loftwall’s CEO. “Square footage is at an all-time premium, and we kept hearing that anything we designed had to have 4 or 5 reasons for existing. That stuck out to us.”

Photography courtesy of Loftwall.

 

The product Loftwall invented to answer this demanding challenge is called Shift and it’s the product of “hundreds of conversations with designers over the last several years,” says Stuckenschneider. It’s a fully-customizable, modular solution that gives designers ultimate aesthetic control. Everything from the powder-coated frame, to the panels, to the surfaces can be altered to fit a client’s exact wants and needs. This includes acoustics integration, writable surfaces, and made-to-order decorative elements like branding.

Photography courtesy of Loftwall.

“Creatively dividing space is our favorite challenge to solve,” says Steve Kinder, Loftwall’s founder. “We launched Shift to solve two problems: lack of privacy and storage—both are a nasty by-product of the open office. We feel excited to get the design community’s feedback on our latest product.”

Shift will be available for specification starting in June 2019. The full Shift system will be on display at NeoCon 2019 at booth #7046.

Continue reading A New Solution for Open Office Shelving

How One Veteran Manufacturer Is Tackling The Open Office

Photography courtesy of Peter Pepper Products.

The open office — what a concept. Touted as the destroyer of traditional workplace hierarchies and the harbinger of a new era of productivity, the lived reality is something a little less than ideal for most office workers. While it’s true that the open layout encourages more collaboration and a sense of community within an office, the noise that is generated from all this communing can negatively affect workers. This has given rise to a whole host of acoustical architectural products specifically designed to abate the din and restore the promise of productivity.

The open office has also lead to a new paradigm in contract specification. The oft-uttered phrase “ancillary is the new primary” describes the rise in the number of specialized sofas, benches, chairs, side tables, and conference tables that populate the myriad break out/flex spaces open offices necessitate. Together these two influences have presented some interesting challenges for manufacturers.

Photography courtesy of Peter Pepper Products.

One brand that has been particularly adept at adapting to this new reality is Peter Pepper Products, a 67-year-old company that got its start in the eponymous founder’s home. Based in the Los Angeles area, Peter Pepper Products was founded on an early recognition that taking the long view with regard to what people need in their workplaces would be a better strategy than merely responding to trends. Their rich portfolio of ancillary pieces have seen a boom in specification and appreciation from designers contending with the rise of open offices.

Photography courtesy of Peter Pepper Products.

“As a start up in 1952, Peter Pepper’s legacy of design innovation is focused on the accessory products,” says Kip Pepper, vice president of sales and marketing at Peter Pepper Products. “And as accessories have now evolved into the ancillary product category with the change from system furniture to the open plan workplace, Peter Pepper in essence has evolved with the space planning trends to continually develop ancillary solutions for all commercial environments.”

At NeoCon, Peter Pepper Products will unveil their Slalom acoustical panels, demonstrating to the design industry that the brand is addressing the open office problem from all angles. Slalom features a light, thin, and frameless profile rendered in 100% recycled polyester fiber. For this reason they are certified GREENGUARD and GREENGUARD GOLD. The brand also offers the panels in a wide variety of colorful finishes that can pair with any interior palette.

Photography courtesy of Peter Pepper Products.

“Our aim with Slalom is to improve the acoustic comfort and therefore the quality of the work environment,” says Pepper. “We strive for better communication and therefore better collaboration, improved concentration with an increase in productivity, and a decrease of annoyance to elevate the working spirit, comfort and enhanced overall performance.”

Continue reading How One Veteran Manufacturer Is Tackling The Open Office

Lori Weitzner x Artistic Tile Collaboration Wows at HD Expo

An example space featuring the Forest pattern in the Whisper colorway. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

Collaboration is the name of the game in today’s design industry. Pairing the inspired sensibilities of a big-name designer with a manufacturer whose technical capabilities can realize their vision has resulted in some stunning products over the years. It’s also highlighted the robust abilities of manufacturers to not only fabricate product, but act as talented design partners in the creative process.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Enter the 2019 HiP Awards by May 17th

The latest iteration of this trend can be found at HD Expo, where Artistic Tile unveiled two new collections made in collaboration with award-winning textile designer Lori Weitzner. Designed specifically for interior vertical surfaces, the Lori Weitzner x Artistic Tile Collaboration features two organic patterns, River and Forest, that originated at Weitzner’s White Box Sanctuary Studio.

Read more: Kohler’s WasteLAB’s Crackle Line with Ann Sacks Breaks the Mold 

The River pattern in the Night Shadows colorway. This look is rendered in China Black marble. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

“When Artistic Tile first proposed this collaboration, I knew our studio could bring something to them that they didn’t currently have in their portfolio,” explains Weitzner. “Organic, textural looks are something that our studio does very well. For Forest and River, we created a lot of preliminary looks through painting, drawing, and paper folding. Then we worked with Artistic Tile to narrow down the selection.”

In exchange for her substantial expertise in creating earthy, tactile patterns with textiles, Artistic Tile opened up a whole new world of materials for Weitzner to discover. “I had no idea there were so many different kinds of stones in world—it was an eye-opening experience for me,” says Weitzner. “Because I didn’t have much knowledge of what was actually possible to create with stone, I could really push the envelope in terms of coming up with patterns. The exceptional design team at Artistic Tile would then say ‘Oh we can’t do that, but maybe we could try this.’ Everyone really benefitted from working and exploring together.”

The Forest pattern in the Whisper colorway. This look is rendered in Bianco Carrara marble. Photography courtesy of Artistic Tile.

 

When it came time to select colorways, Weitzner and Artistic Tile settled on three varieties of marble in black and white tones. “Sometimes people don’t think of whites and blacks as colors but they absolutely are,” says Weitzner. “We selected whites and blacks that create mood and easily serve as backdrops to other colors, but aren’t dead.”

The Whisper palette utilizes Bardiglio Nuvolato and Bianco Carrara marbles. The lightness of these stones creates an ambiance of calm, quiet, and sanctuary. On the opposite end, the Night Shadows palette veers towards a masculine, urban sophistication rendered in China Black marble.

Both River and Forest are available now for specification. 

Watch now: Product Insight: ExCinere by Dzek in Collaboration with Formafantasma

Continue reading Lori Weitzner x Artistic Tile Collaboration Wows at HD Expo

Bentley Carries California Dreamin’ Into The 21st Century

Photography courtesy of Bentley.

1979 was a wild year in world history — the Iran Hostage Crisis, Three Mile Island, and the rise Thatcherism all marked the conclusion of the Disco Decade. Over in Los Angeles, the SoCal hardcore punk scene burst into the mainstream. Bands like Black Flag and Bad Religion vehemently decried the inauthenticity of their predecessors, the fashion-conscious Hollywood art punk bands like X and the Go-Go’s, in favor of a new gritty realism that celebrated a pared-down aesthetic and embrace of diverse voices. It was in this artistic, chaotic, and fecund melting pot that Bentley was born.

Photography courtesy of Bentley. 

Eschewing the traditional “carpet capital” (Georgia) for L.A. turned out to be a fortuitous choice for the 40-year-old brand. Today, they are the largest commercial carpet manufacturer in California. They haven’t forgotten their roots though — their products reflect a keen understanding of L.A.’s embrace of both grit and glamour. They also still prize the diversity of voices that call the City of Angels home.

“Looking back over the huge changes we’ve seen between 1979 and now, the one constant has been our Bentley family,” says Jim Harley, president of Bentley. “I truly believe that our people are the reason we’ve been able to maintain the integrity of our name and the loyalty of our customers.”

Photography courtesy of Bentley.

The people who power Bentley have elevated it into a multi-dimensional boutique brand with the stamina to keep pace with the larger mills while retaining the agility to cater to the evolving expectations of customers. Following on the 1982 success of Kings Road, the brand’s debut top-selling product, the company continues to deliver double-digit growth. This growth is bolstered by Bentley’s burgeoning portfolio of products, which includes broadloom, carpet tile, LVT, and modulyss flatweave.

Photography courtesy of Bentley.

“I’ve seen many brands come and go over the years,” says Richard French, Bentley’s vice president of global sales and marketing. “I’ve also seen them survive, only to lose sight of their identity as well as the attributes that made them specifiable. The fact that Bentley has been able to hold strong to our core and yet still be flexible enough to evolve with market demands is a testament to how solid our foundation truly is.”

Looking into the future, Bentley has turned their eyes to innovation, particularly with regard to sustainability. They’ve already set a good precedent — the brand has been monitoring greenhouse gases since 1994 and was the first carpet manufacturer to earn LEED-EBOM Silver and LEED-EBOM Gold accreditation. Today they are investing in sustainable energy sources, challenging other manufactures to match their Cradle-to-Cradle accomplishments, and diverting more waste away from North American landfills.

Photography courtesy of Bentley.

Not so bad for a solid middle-ager in a market that prizes youth and vitality! Bentley will surely keep the design industry on its toes for the next 40 years.

Continue reading Bentley Carries California Dreamin’ Into The 21st Century

Hear The Call of the Wild In Gerflor’s New DLW Linoleum Collection

Gerflor’s new DLW Landscape collection in Spicy Orange. Imagery courtesy of Gerflor USA.

 

When it comes to sustainable flooring, some manufacturers are pulling out all the stops to create a never-before-seen, material-of-the-future product for architects and designers. There’s nothing wrong with that, but why reinvent the wheel — which is to say, why did everyone forget about linoleum?

Linoleum may have been invented nearly 160 years ago, but that doesn’t make it antiquated. Indeed, in today’s sustainably-minded A&D industry, linoleum has a real edge over its twenty-first-century counterparts — it’s 100% recyclable and biodegradable. The only thing that seems to get in linoleum’s way is its aesthetic associations with the homely suburban architecture of the 1950’s. 

Gerflor’s new DLW Landscape collection in Dive. Imagery courtesy of Gerflor USA.

Gerflor, a premier European manufacturer of commercial resilient flooring, has updated the veteran material’s look with a new, biophilic collection that connects back to linoleum’s organic origins. The DLW Landscape sheet flooring collection features 43 colorful patterns drawn from some of the most stunning landscapes and natural wonders across the globe: California’s iconic coastline, the Grand Canyon, volcanoes, fall foliage, and sweeping deserts, among others. 

Gerflor’s new DLW Landscape collection in Lobster Red. Imagery courtesy of Gerflor USA.

“Biophilia is the foundational base of the collection,” explains Catherine del Vecchio, Gerflor USA’s senior director of marketing. “Our goal was to stay true to the nature of linoleum, believing it to be the perfect material for designers to elevate sustainability and creativity in their projects.  We like to think of the DLW Landscape collection as both inspired by and made from nature.”

The technical aspects of this product are just as intriguing. Gerflor’s linoleum is derived from 100% recyclable and biodegradable linseed oil, wood flour, limestone, jute, resin, and natural coloration pigments. It is manufactured in an ISO 9001 and 14001-certified factory that boasts 100% energy and waste recycling. Coincidentally this factory, located in Delmenhorst, Germany, is the very first and only remaining linoleum factory in that country. 

Gerflor’s new DLW Landscape collection in Curacao Petrol. Imagery courtesy of Gerflor USA. 

For all this careful attention to both ingredients and process, Gerflor’s DLW Landscape Collection has racked up an astounding amount of environmental accreditations. Specifically, the collection has a USDA organic label, a Blue Angel certification, FloorScore® certification, and a Declare label. “The labels and certifications are a huge honor, but we are most proud of being able to offer our customers a smart alternative that can bring positive change to the built environment,” says del Vecchio. 

Gerflor’s new DLW Landscape collection in Antique Green. Imagery courtesy of Gerflor USA.

Continue reading Hear The Call of the Wild In Gerflor’s New DLW Linoleum Collection

Healthcare and Education Projects Deserve Better Flooring

Photography courtesy of Mats Inc.

When it comes to specifying flooring, healthcare and education projects can pose real challenges to designers. These spaces see a lot of action and require products that perform consistently well. There are a whole host of demands on flooring for hospitals, schools, auditoriums, and nursing homes: durability, pliability, germ resistance, sound dampening, and good aesthetics. It’s a tall order, but one company has a solution that goes above and beyond.

Rendering courtesy of Mats Inc.

 

Designed specifically with the healthcare and education sectors in mind, Mats Inc.’s Tailor Grace fashion-forward flooring provides a long-lasting, environmentally-friendly, and aesthetic alternative to standard commercial flooring options. Designers working on classrooms, NICU’s, libraries, and operating rooms can focus on aesthetics knowing that Tailor Grace is a high-performance option well-equipped to handle anything these sectors throw at it. 

Photography courtesy of Mats Inc.

Although its name draws inspiration from fashion, there’s nothing superficial about Tailor Grace. The line draws inspiration from the capsule wardrobe, focusing on timeless and easily mixed-and-matched looks. The four collections—Natural Nautical, Denim and Leather, Tasteful Modern, and Urban Classic—feature saturated hues and wood tones with matte finishes. Mixing two or more collections together yields a look that is both dynamic and pleasing. 

Photography courtesy of Mats Inc. 

 

With the inclusion of Tailor Grace, Mats Inc. ensures that designers now have a product that not only keeps people healthy and comfortable, but also elevates these spaces to a new standard of beauty.

Continue reading Healthcare and Education Projects Deserve Better Flooring

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