Tag Archives: Amenities

This Tiny House In Belarus May Look Small, But It Fits A Family Of Three And A Dog

One family in Belarus has moved into their do-it-yourself micro house which takes up only 16 m2 (around 160 square feet) and where every single inch is put to good use.

The family of three-and-a-half (that’s their dog), started the project when they found themselves paying over $500 for rent in the city of Minsk every month. So instead, they made a smart investment of only $4600 (that includes the furnishings) and built this micro house. Inside it has all of the necessary amenities: a bathroom, a kitchen, living space, and even a washing machine.

It uses natural gas and electricity for heating and thanks to the good insulation has become a permanent family home whole year round. Another cool bit is that this house can be transported anywhere, as long as they get a permit from the road police.

It’s definitely one of the coolest DIY projects I’ve seen, but I just can’t make up my mind whether I could live in a house like this myself. Could you? Let me know in the comments!

(h/t: englishrussia, dyt)

A family of three (and their dog) from Belarus moved from the city to save money on rent which was around $500 per month

They moved into their do-it-yourself micro house built for $4600

Which takes up only 16 m2 (around 160 square feet)

The interior is more cramped than you could guess from the outside

It’s because every single inch is put to good use

They used insulation to be able to live here for the whole year round

They also have all the necessary amenities

Like a bedroom, a kitchen, living space

A Bathroom…

Fitted with a shower

And even a washing machine

They use natural gas and electricity for heating

And the house can be transported anywhere, as long as they get a permit from the road police.

Japanese are also known to make the most out of tiny houses.

Continue reading This Tiny House In Belarus May Look Small, But It Fits A Family Of Three And A Dog

Beyond Amenities, What’s Next for Workplace Design?

At a panel discussion titled “The New Basics,” designers, developers, and facilities experts tried to work out what will be essential to the office of the future.

 

From private chefs to meditation rooms, companies have pulled out all the stops when it comes to amenities in the workplace. Whether driven by the battle for talent or employee demands, tech and media organizations in particular continue to vie with one another to provide employee benefits. Cafes, phone booths, and lounges have become commonplace, with nap rooms and fitness centers following suit. But how much amenity is too much amenity? Is there any downside to this trend, and what should we consider to be the new basics of the office?

A group of workplace experts gathered at the Poppin showroom in San Francisco earlier this year to discuss these questions and point to a way forward in office design. Primo Orpilla, whose award-winning firm Studio O+A created some of the first amenity-rich offices in the tech sector, spoke to the origins of the trend. “We really just wanted to create a place where people would come together, collaborate, share ideas and maybe spend a little more time, and that time be more meaningful,” he said. “It was also a great way for the company to show that they cared.”

But now the pendulum might have swung too far, said Alex Spilger, vice president of development and director of sustainability at Cushman & Wakefield: “I see friends that work for these tech companies that say, ‘I want to leave my job but I’m afraid to give up the free massage and the free food,’ and I have to ask them, ‘Are you staying there for the right reasons?’”

Amenities cannot be expected to stand in for a sense of purpose among employees, and companies have to work at fostering that spirit of community. “The spaces have to have meaning to the company and to the employees,” said Verda Alexander, cofounder of Studio O+A. “The idea of superficial amenity spaces really needs to fall by the wayside.”

So what kinds of amenities would not be considered superficial? Sometimes, essential amenities are determined by the culture of the organization, said John Liu, facilities director at Rakuten. At his company, “AV is gargantuan everywhere because that allows [companies] to have video conferencing with every office, to be able to sync up without having employees travel as much.” Hoteling is another such amenity, which Liu finds he has to figure more and more into his headcount projections.

However, workers aren’t just concerned about short-term benefits for themselves or their employers. “People want to work for companies that care,” Spilger said, “so a commitment to sustainability is a core amenity.” The urban (or suburban) context, and the company’s commitments to the community outside also figure heavily in employees’ list of wants. “Those values are part of the new basics,” said Jason Bonnet, vice president of development at Brookfield Properties. “I can get a paycheck from any tech company here, but what are you really doing when I step outside as it relates to improving where I live?” At Brookfield’s new developments in San Francisco, such as 5M and Pier 70, office spaces are situated within a mixed-use context. The developers have built social impact into the plans, offering ground-level activations and donating spaces to non-profits.

Talking about the backlash against tech giants in Seattle and San Francisco, Alexander said she wished offices could integrate “more amenity spaces that are maybe on the ground floor, accessible to the public and that interact with the public. I would love to see more social responsibility, environmental responsibility, and any kind of amenity space that could directly engage the public.”

Spilger summed up the discussion by offering a demographic analysis of where workplace design needs to focus next. “A lot of amenities were driven by millennials—ping pong tables, foosball, free food, happy hours,” he said. “Those millennials are starting families. They no longer need the happy hour or the ping pong table; they want flexibility, autonomy, and purpose behind the work.”

Categories: Workplace Interiors

Continue reading Beyond Amenities, What’s Next for Workplace Design?

2018 predictions for healthcare facility design

From emergency departments to microhospitals, to the amenities in and locations of hospitals, the year ahead will see continued changes in how healthcare providers are designing and equipping their facilities.

E4H Environments for Health Architecture, an architecture firm focused exclusively on healthcare, recently released seven predictions for healthcare facility design trends in 2018.

Continue reading 2018 predictions for healthcare facility design

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