Category Archives: Interior Design

20 Funny Comics For Dark Humor Lovers By French Artist Rémi Lascault (New Pics)

Rémi Lascault is a French artist with a twisted sense of humor who has been creating dark comics with unexpected endings since 2017. During the years, the man amassed a following of over 60k people from all over the world, and if you’re a fan of dark humor, I’m sure you’ll join the ranks.

Continue reading 20 Funny Comics For Dark Humor Lovers By French Artist Rémi Lascault (New Pics)

Designers Were Challenged To Imagine Ads In Unexpected Places And Here’s The Result (30 Pics)

Most of us don’t like ads. People usually think they’re obnoxious, too colorful, and can ruin many good-looking things like houses, streets, websites, etc. However, ads are crucial for many businesses out there. They help spread the word about your company, product, or services to the masses. Without advertisement, the world would be a much different place. But what if ads were almost everywhere?

Continue reading Designers Were Challenged To Imagine Ads In Unexpected Places And Here’s The Result (30 Pics)

Wildlife Photographer Captures A ‘Never Before Seen’ 1-In-146k Yellow Penguin

As we have witnessed ourselves time and time again, nature is full of surprises. Whether it’s a wild owl deciding to sit on your head, stumbling upon a pink manta ray, managing to snap the ‘perfect timing’ kind of solar eclipse, or finding a dwarf giraffe, nature never ceases to amaze us with its beauty and uniqueness.

This time around, it’s in the vein of animals that are not the color that they are naturally supposed to be. Namely, a nature guide was lucky enough to find a one-of-a-kind yellow-colored penguin in the wild and snapped some photos of it.

Continue reading Wildlife Photographer Captures A ‘Never Before Seen’ 1-In-146k Yellow Penguin

6 Famous World Heritage Sites Digitally Reconstructed To Show How They Looked Back In The Day

Currently, there are 1,121 properties on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, 53 of which are listed as “in danger”. There are multiple reasons why these historic sites are endangered, with armed conflict and war, earthquakes, natural disasters, pollution, poaching, uncontrolled urbanization and unchecked tourist development being just a few. Sadly, if strict measures aren’t taken, this could mean that these historic relics will one day be completely destroyed and we’ll never be able to enjoy them again.

Continue reading 6 Famous World Heritage Sites Digitally Reconstructed To Show How They Looked Back In The Day

Man Lives On His Own Private Island In Florida And Here’s How His Life Looks

According to Stephanie Seferian, the host of The Sustainable Minimalists podcast, minimalism is the intentional choice to live with less. Tim Davidson is one of the people who made this choice. And he hasn’t look looked back ever since.

In 2017, Tim was given 60 days to move out of his family’s vacation home in Florida. At first, he thought about buying a traditional-size home. But as time went by, Tim realized that something that big would probably result in unused space, unnecessary belongings, more taxes, and more money.

Continue reading Man Lives On His Own Private Island In Florida And Here’s How His Life Looks

Raw Reality Of Life And People In The Middle Eastern Region Captured By This Iraqi Photographer (61 Pics)

Tamara Abdul Hadi is an independent photographer born to Iraqi parents in the United Arab Emirates and raised in Montreal, Canada. Abdul Hadi's work explores the complexity and idiosyncrasy of minority communities that are often subjected to stereotypes and under-representation interchangeably. Her work also touches on ideas of masculinity and self-representation and has been successfully published in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, VICE, etc.
Along with being a photographer, Tamara is also an educator who has given photography workshops in Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, the UAE, Kuwait, and Tunisia. Back In 2016, Tamara, along with her collective Rawiya, presented a documentary photography storytelling workshop in Gaza.
Bored Panda reached out to the photographer to find out more.
"I am an Iraqi photographer whose work is concerned with the historic and contemporary representation of my culture, in its diversity. Photography allows me to express, question, and be curious."

Tamara Abdul Hadi is an independent photographer born to Iraqi parents in the United Arab Emirates and raised in Montreal, Canada. Abdul Hadi’s work explores the complexity and idiosyncrasy of minority communities that are often subjected to stereotypes and under-representation interchangeably. Her work also touches on ideas of masculinity and self-representation and has been successfully published in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, VICE, etc.

Along with being a photographer, Tamara is also an educator who has given photography workshops in Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, the UAE, Kuwait, and Tunisia. Back In 2016, Tamara, along with her collective Rawiya, presented a documentary photography storytelling workshop in Gaza.

Bored Panda reached out to the photographer to find out more.

“I am an Iraqi photographer whose work is concerned with the historic and contemporary representation of my culture, in its diversity. Photography allows me to express, question, and be curious.”

More info: Instagram | tamarabdulhadi.com#1 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Buffalo Child. 

Nihaya, around 10 years old (they often don’t know their exact ages here) sits on her family’s buffalo at sunrise in the Marshes. I spent the night in Nihaya’s family’s reed house and woke up to the young women of the family milking the buffalos along with their father and brothers.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report31pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Sweet portrait0ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#2 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report30pointsPOST

kristy sickles1 week ago

Such a sweet moment!5Reply#3 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report27pointsPOST

Sanne H.1 week ago(edited)

The house looks like coming straight from the Afghan animated movie “The Breadwinner”2ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#4 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report24pointsPOST

Lucas Crouch1 week ago

the sad thing is, thats probably all they have. as in, thats probably all their only playground is3Replyhttps://9eb5ba0152006719a65215f81590e1f3.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html#5 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

2009/2015.
 
The cemetery of Bab il Nasr in Cairo has been home to hundreds of families living among their deceased ancestors for the past 60 years. This sprawling cemetery is located in central Cairo, near the Imam Hussein Mosque. ‘This is a cemetery of the living’, says Mohammed Abdel Lateef. He lives with 9 other family members in their family’s section of the graveyard. Mohammed, in his thirties, and his siblings, Hussien, Ahmed, and Ahlam, were born here.

“This has been my home since 1966,” says Haj Abdel Lateef, Mohammed’s father, and the family’s patriarch. He and his wife Atiyat have raised 5 children here. They went to schools nearby, work in the area, and now have children of their own.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report23pointsPOST

Everydayhuman831 week ago

Sad to see those 2 kids like that2ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#6 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Banin, around 10 years old (they often don’t know their exact ages here), sits on her favorite buffalo near her home in the Iraqi Marshlands. Banin was a very high spirited young lady who took me around, introducing me to her many family members.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report23pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Her loving smile says it all1Reply#7 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

2009/2015.
 
The cemetery of Bab il Nasr in Cairo has been home to hundreds of families living among their deceased ancestors for the past 60 years. This sprawling cemetery is located in central Cairo, near the Imam Hussein Mosque. ‘This is a cemetery of the living’, says Mohammed Abdel Lateef. He lives with 9 other family members in their family’s section of the graveyard. Mohammed, in his thirties, and his siblings, Hussien, Ahmed, and Ahlam, were born here.

“This has been my home since 1966,” says Haj Abdel Lateef, Mohammed’s father, and the family’s patriarch. He and his wife Atiyat have raised 5 children here. They went to schools nearby, work in the area, and now have children of their own.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report19pointsPOST#8 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, in what was once the center of ancient Mesopotamia, lies an area of wetland known as al-ahwar of southern Iraq (the Marshes). It was on this spot, between the 4th and 3rd millennium BCE, that Sumerians built their houses from reeds native to the marshlands, an ancient architectural practice still followed today. Far more recently, in the 1950s, the Iraqi government started draining the lands to support the extraction of a newly-discovered natural resource: oil. 
 
The social and political life of the area changed again a few short decades later, in the 1980s and 1990s when Saddam Hussein further drained the lands as a way to prevent domestic rebels from seeking sanctuary there, and as punishment for anti-government activities supported by the area’s inhabitants. After the US- and UK-led invasion and occupation of Iraq in 2003, and the removal of the former regime, comprehensive efforts to repair the marshes and its ecosystem were initiated in earnest with the hope of restoring everyday life for the area’s people, the mi’dan. These images are part of series visualizing the people of the contemporary Iraqi Marshes.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report18pointsPOST

Everydayhuman831 week ago

Mesopotamia!1ReplyView more commentshttps://9eb5ba0152006719a65215f81590e1f3.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html#9 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

2009/2015.
 
The cemetery of Bab il Nasr in Cairo has been home to hundreds of families living among their deceased ancestors for the past 60 years. This sprawling cemetery is located in central Cairo, near the Imam Hussein Mosque. ‘This is a cemetery of the living’, says Mohammed Abdel Lateef. He lives with 9 other family members in their family’s section of the graveyard. Mohammed, in his thirties, and his siblings, Hussien, Ahmed, and Ahlam, were born here.

“This has been my home since 1966,” says Haj Abdel Lateef, Mohammed’s father, and the family’s patriarch. He and his wife Atiyat have raised 5 children here. They went to schools nearby, work in the area, and now have children of their own.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report17pointsPOST

Sac Shim1 week ago

Beautiful colours0Reply#10 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Fade to Black is a portrait series documenting African asylum seekers’ barbershop culture in South Tel Aviv. These Muslim and Christian Sudanese, Eritrean and Ethiopian refugees have made the Levinsky Park neighborhood home, where they run barbershops, restaurants, and clothing stores. Finding their communities in the midst of being discriminated against systemically by their ‘chosen home’.

This series was born out of an appreciation for their personal style and their self-expression through their fashion and hairstyles. From 2006-2012, a large influx of African asylum seekers arrived in Israel, with many having been trafficked through the Sinai Peninsula. Currently, about 38,000 of them are facing deportation.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report16pointsPOST

Dave P1 week ago

This is a very complex issue. Those who can prove they are genuine asylum seekers get residency cards and by now over 20,000 have gotten full citizenship. What these are those who entered illegally, cannot prove they are asylum seekers, over 70% of which are young males looking for work. There are a lot of issues with a country 8 million people, with 1.5 million of their own citizens living below the poverty line dealing with over 200,000 people claiming asylum. Also sorry to inform the description, they are not running ” barbershops, restaurants, and clothing stores” it is illegal for asylum seekers to be employed or own businesses unless they get their full residency card, which most don’t. Out of the 38,000 listed as facing deportation, if you look it up, 22,000 have criminal records during their time in Israel for violent felonies and similar crimes and all 38,000 had full hearings where the state had to prove these people were not legitimate asylum seekers.5ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#11 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report14pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Leopard print and colours other than black….these ladies own it !!1ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#12 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Meet Mohammad. He is a 22-year-old Syrian refugee currently in Lebanon. Mohammad suffers from the muscle disease myopathy, and as time goes by, he will slowly lose functionality in all his limbs. Mohammad and 3 of his siblings all suffer from the disease. 

In this photo, Mohamad does one of his favorite things, sitting in the sunshine outside his home.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report14pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Incredible, the true grit of this young man !! All odds against him and still he is well-groomed and well-dressed. Looking at his surroundings and thinking of what lies in wait for him,it breaks my heart,2Reply#13 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Playing cards in an empty swimming pool.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report14pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Very scenic-1ReplyView more comments#14 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

This ‘war machine graveyard’ in Sulimaniyah, Kurdistan -Northern Iraq- is a grim reminder of decades of war in Iraq. Mountains of used missiles, US military tanks, humvees, and other used weaponry fill the landscape.
 
This landscape speaks volumes as to the result of the destruction, occupation, and violence that this country has witnessed in the last 30 years.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report13pointsPOST

Everydayhuman831 week ago

Caution No Smoking May Still Work-3ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#15 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Al Amari, Ramallah.

The lives of people living in marginalized communities can be tremendously underrepresented. Who they are, their lives, and their stories are often undocumented. Do they choose how to represent their own photo? Are they given the option to imagine themselves richly in their own eyes? This project goes beyond the idea of people snapping their own photographs, it is an interactive exercise where people have the ability to control their own image and for once, decide how to represent themselves.

This project was inspired by the Handsworth Self Portrait, Birmingham, 1979.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report13pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Glad this project provides a personal opportunity1Reply#16 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Meet Mohammad. He just turned 6 years old and like his siblings Bayan (12) and Zamzam (8) he has myopathy. The siblings recently received orthopedic devices that will help with their movement. In this photo, Mohammad tries his out at home.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report13pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Glad they now have help with mobility. I can only imagine it how difficult mobility must be for Mohammad and his siblings, even after receiving the walkers.1Reply#17 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, in what was once the center of ancient Mesopotamia, lies an area of wetland known as al-ahwar of southern Iraq (the Marshes). It was on this spot, between the 4th and 3rd millennium BCE, that Sumerians built their houses from reeds native to the marshlands, an ancient architectural practice still followed today. Far more recently, in the 1950s, the Iraqi government started draining the lands to support the extraction of a newly-discovered natural resource: oil.
 
The social and political life of the area changed again a few short decades later, in the 1980s and 1990s when Saddam Hussein further drained the lands as a way to prevent domestic rebels from seeking sanctuary there, and as punishment for anti-government activities supported by the area’s inhabitants. After the US- and UK-led invasion and occupation of Iraq in 2003, and the removal of the former regime, comprehensive efforts to repair the marshes and its ecosystem were initiated in earnest with the hope of restoring everyday life for the area’s people, the mi’dan. These images are part of series visualizing the people of the contemporary Iraqi Marshes.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report12pointsPOST

Commander Rex1 week ago

Did America hear… OIL?0Reply#18 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Cheerleaders.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report12pointsPOST

Pervinca1 week ago

It would be interesting to have a more detailed description2Reply#19 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Zahra and Mohamad, along with their parents, waiting to be picked up and taken to their weekly physiotherapy sessions.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report12pointsPOST

Iapetos1 week ago

That writing in the background looks a lot like the greek letter used for “micro”. Someone care to start a little lesson in arabic writing?-1ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#20 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

2009-2014.

Started in 2009, this portrait series is part of a large body of work capturing semi-nude Arab men of diverse backgrounds.

The conceptual aim of this portrait series is two-fold: Trying to uncover and break the stereotypes placed upon the Arab male, and providing an alternative visual representation of that identity. Secondly, it is a celebration of their sensual beauty, an unexplored aspect of the identity of the contemporary Arab man, on the cusp of change in a society that reveres an out-dated form of hyper-masculinity.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report11pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

I like these pensive photos0ReplyView more comments#21 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Spotted.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report11pointsPOST

Everydayhuman831 week ago

0_0 The Caption Says All2Reply#22 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Photographs of young men pre, mid, and during flight, diving into the sea surrounding Beirut, Akka, Tunis, and Gaza.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report10pointsPOST#23 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Al Amari, Ramallah.

The lives of people living in marginalized communities can be tremendously underrepresented. Who they are, their lives, and their stories are often undocumented. Do they choose how to represent their own photo? Are they given the option to imagine themselves richly in their own eyes? This project goes beyond the idea of people snapping their own photographs, it is an interactive exercise where people have the ability to control their own image and for once, decide how to represent themselves.

This project was inspired by the Handsworth Self Portrait, Birmingham, 1979.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report10pointsPOST#24 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Best friends.

Meet Karrar and Falah. They dressed alike on purpose that day. 19 and 25 years old respectively, they are from Chabayish, on the banks of the Euphrates, a 10-minute boat drive to the Marsh Islands.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report10pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Lovely shades of blue0Reply#25 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report9pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Meditation enhanced by smoke-1Reply#26 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report9pointsPOST

Jon S.1 week ago

I’d love to know the context of this one4ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#27 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

2009-2014.

Started in 2009, this portrait series is part of a large body of work capturing semi-nude Arab men of diverse backgrounds.

The conceptual aim of this portrait series is two-fold: Trying to uncover and break the stereotypes placed upon the Arab male, and providing an alternative visual representation of that identity. Secondly, it is a celebration of their sensual beauty, an unexplored aspect of the identity of the contemporary Arab man, on the cusp of change in a society that reveres an out-dated form of hyper-masculinity.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report9pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Lovely, expressive eyes0Reply#28 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Abdullah.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report9pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Sun,Sea…and a Smoke…2Reply#29 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

I came across Arakel this morning while he was having a cigarette at the door of his house.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report9pointsPOST

Sanne H.1 week ago(edited)

A bit of context: Arakel is a city in (islamic) Azerbaijan, in the disputed Nagoro-Karabach region, where the majority of the population consists of (christian) Armenians. [Edit: I initially thought Arakel referred to the location where the picture was taken, but I just realised that “Arakel” is just the name of this guy]3Reply#30 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Itinerant musicians?0Reply#31 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

So proud of their Bad Boy stick-on tattooes…sweet..0ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#32 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

I wonder what his tat says1Reply#33 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Seven is a series of images documenting the destruction of a Palestinian neighborhood in the city of Lyd, in Occupied Palestine. 7 homes belonging to the Abu Eid family were reduced to rubble when the Israeli military destroyed the neighborhood in December 2010 leaving them to sleep in tents next to their former homes. These are images of the tents in the aftermath.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Dave P1 week ago

The term “Occupied Palestine” is a political term, not a legal one. The the legal term is “Disputed Territories” due to the complexity and disputed legality of this area. Also this is not “Lyd” which was a Zone C which under the Oslo Accords is Israeli jurisdiction. Lyd was not a city but a makeshift camp of 40 trailers, built illegally without permits in a military “no-go-zone” just 8 years prior to being demolished and was destroyed after a 3 year legal battle with a court order, done under the supervision of the International Red Cross. This is blatantly false and using politicized terms that are not factual. This picture is from a very different area and not Lyd. Lying to score political points is a disgrace1ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#34 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

‘Najaf is a place for burying, not for living’ – Iraqi proverb.

Wadi As-Salam [eng; Valley of Peace], is a cemetery located in Najaf, a province in the Western part of Central Iraq. Najaf is distinguished by this vast cemetery (over 5 million people are buried here), which is considered to be the second largest and oldest cemetery in the world. The cemetery is home to generations upon generations of Iraqis and Shiaa’s gone past and has also bore witness to generations of turmoil and war both directly on its land and beneath it. It also saw fierce battles between US troops and the Mehdi army during the battle for Najaf in 2004.

The symbolic value of the cemetery’s name nestled in a nation so overcome by war is what compelled this photo series.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST#35 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

‘Najaf is a place for burying, not for living’ – Iraqi proverb

Wadi As-Salam [eng; Valley of Peace], is a cemetery located in Najaf, a province in the Western part of Central Iraq. Najaf is distinguished by this vast cemetery (over 5 million people are buried here), which is considered to be the second largest and oldest cemetery in the world. The cemetery is home to generations upon generations of Iraqis and Shiaa’s gone past and has also bore witness to generations of turmoil and war both directly on its land and beneath it. It also saw fierce battles between US troops and the Mehdi army during the battle for Najaf in 2004.

The symbolic value of the cemetery’s name nestled in a nation so overcome by war is what compelled this photo series.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST#36 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Ahmed and his horse(s).

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Beautiful photo that shows the bond between them.2Reply#37 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Thank you to this kind gentleman for letting me photograph him out of my appreciation for his pink on pink combo.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report8pointsPOST

Jette Wang Wahnon1 week ago

Sikh ?0Reply#38 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST

Kim St1 week ago

wow someone is excited0Reply#39 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Fade to Black is a portrait series documenting African asylum seekers’ barbershop culture in South Tel Aviv. These Muslim and Christian Sudanese, Eritrean and Ethiopian refugees have made the Levinsky Park neighborhood home, where they run barbershops, restaurants, and clothing stores. Finding their communities in the midst of being discriminated against systemically by their ‘chosen home’.

This series was born out of an appreciation for their personal style and their self-expression through their fashion and hairstyles. From 2006-2012, a large influx of African asylum seekers arrived in Israel, with many having been trafficked through the Sinai Peninsula. Currently, about 38,000 of them are facing deportation.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST

Dave P1 week ago

This is a very complex issue. Those who can prove they are genuine asylum seekers get residency cards and by now over 20,000 have gotten full citizenship. What these are those who entered illegally, cannot prove they are asylum seekers, over 70% of which are young males looking for work. There are a lot of issues with a country 8 million people, with 1.5 million of their own citizens living below the poverty line dealing with over 200,000 people claiming asylum. Also sorry to inform the description, they are not running ” barbershops, restaurants, and clothing stores” it is illegal for asylum seekers to be employed or own businesses unless they get their full residency card, which most don’t. Out of the 38,000 listed as facing deportation, if you look it up, 22,000 have criminal records during their time in Israel for violent felonies and similar crimes and all 38,000 had full hearings where the state had to prove these people were not legitimate asylum seekers.-1ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#40 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

This ‘war machine graveyard’ in Sulimaniyah, Kurdistan -Northern Iraq- is a grim reminder of decades of war in Iraq. Mountains of used missiles, US military tanks, humvees, and other used weaponry fill the landscape.
 
This landscape speaks volumes as to the result of the destruction, occupation, and violence that this country has witnessed in the last 30 years.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST

Sanne H.1 week ago

Sadly not only the last 30 years.1ReplyView more comments#41 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Beirut: Abdel Atheem is a hair artist. He practices his art at his barbershop “Salon El Raqi” which roughly translates to “Elegant Salon” in the Naba’a neighborhood of Beirut, Lebanon. Abdel Atheem is from Raqqa in Syria and is displaced in Beirut. His specialties include a beard trim and black dye combination.

Ramallah: Tamer Shehadeh wants to bring Palestinian hairdressing worldwide. Shehadeh owns “Salon Tamer” that began as a small shop in the Qalandia refugee camp in Ramallah and has grown into a much larger shop on a main street in the city. Tamer specializes in facial treatments, gold face masks, and waxes.

Gaza: Mohamad Bakir is a hairdresser in the city of Gaza. He inherited his barbershop “Salon Rimal” from his father and grooms most of the football players of the city. Bakir released his book “Historical Encyclopedia of Hairdressing in Gaza” in 2016.

“The People’s Salon” is a celebration of the burgeoning creative talent that is designing and shaping our men’s hair. It is an appreciation of their personal style and their self-expression through self-care and hairstyles.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST#42 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Seven is a series of images documenting the destruction of a Palestinian neighborhood in the city of Lyd, in Occupied Palestine. 7 homes belonging to the Abu Eid family were reduced to rubble when the Israeli military destroyed the neighborhood in December 2010 leaving them to sleep in tents next to their former homes. These are images of the tents in the aftermath.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST

Dave P1 week ago

The term “Occupied Palestine” is a political term, not a legal one. The the legal term is “Disputed Territories” due to the complexity and disputed legality of this area. This area is in Zone C which under the Oslo Accords is Israeli jurisdiction. Further this was not a city but a makeshift camp of 40 trailers, built illegally without permits in a military “no-go-zone” just 8 years prior to being demolished and was destroyed after a 3 year legal battle with a court order, done under the supervision of the International Red Cross. This is blatantly false and using politicized terms that are not factual.-1ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#43 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Roi and Marvin, uncle and nephew.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Lovely family photo0ReplyView more comments#44 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Marshland Outtakes part two. She was milking the buffalo with her father when I met her.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST#45 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Roumieh.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST#46 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Sun, sea, cigarette.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report7pointsPOST#47 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

‘Najaf is a place for burying, not for living’ – Iraqi proverb.

Wadi As-Salam [eng; Valley of Peace], is a cemetery located in Najaf, a province in the Western part of Central Iraq. Najaf is distinguished by this vast cemetery (over 5 million people are buried here), which is considered to be the second largest and oldest cemetery in the world. The cemetery is home to generations upon generations of Iraqis and Shiaa’s gone past and has also bore witness to generations of turmoil and war both directly on its land and beneath it. It also saw fierce battles between US troops and the Mehdi army during the battle for Najaf in 2004.

The symbolic value of the cemetery’s name nestled in a nation so overcome by war is what compelled this photo series.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report6pointsPOST#48 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Sea battle.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report6pointsPOST#49 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Balcony chat with Bashar in Beirut.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report6pointsPOST#50 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Photographs of young men pre, mid, and during flight, diving into the sea surrounding Beirut, Akka, Tunis, and Gaza.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST#51 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Beirut: Abdel Atheem is a hair artist. He practices his art at his barbershop “Salon El Raqi” which roughly translates to “Elegant Salon” in the Naba’a neighborhood of Beirut, Lebanon. Abdel Atheem is from Raqqa in Syria and is displaced in Beirut. His specialties include a beard trim and black dye combination.

Ramallah: Tamer Shehadeh wants to bring Palestinian hairdressing worldwide. Shehadeh owns “Salon Tamer” that began as a small shop in the Qalandia refugee camp in Ramallah and has grown into a much larger shop on a main street in the city. Tamer specializes in facial treatments, gold face masks, and waxes.

Gaza: Mohamad Bakir is a hairdresser in the city of Gaza. He inherited his barbershop “Salon Rimal” from his father and grooms most of the football players of the city. Bakir released his book “Historical Encyclopedia of Hairdressing in Gaza” in 2016.

“The People’s Salon” is a celebration of the burgeoning creative talent that is designing and shaping our men’s hair. It is an appreciation of their personal style and their self-expression through self-care and hairstyles.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST#52 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST#53 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Sun, sea, and cigarette.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST#54 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Not backing down.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST

Electric Uncle Trash1 week ago

FREE PALESTINE!0Reply#55 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Mehdi, Abbas, and Eidan, hanging after school in the town of Chabayish, Southern Iraq, near the Iraqi Marshlands.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report5pointsPOST#56 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report4pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Nice composition. I’d like to know its story-1Reply#57 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report4pointsPOST

Everydayhuman831 week ago

… Messy-3ReplyView More Replies…View more comments#58 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Day 41.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report4pointsPOST

Electric Uncle Trash1 week ago

FREE PALESTINE! FREE GAZA!0ReplyView more comments#59 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Sunday.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report4pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Palms reminded me of fireworks at first glance-1Reply#60 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Hamed.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report4pointsPOST#61 

Meet Tamara Abdul Hadi, An Iraqi Photographer Who Is Concerned With The Historical And Contemporary Representation Of Her Culture, In Its Diversity

Marvin and Maria with their uncle.

Tamara Abdul Hadi Report3pointsPOST

Annie1 week ago

Family bonding time0Reply

Follow Bored Panda on Google News!60 FollowHidrėlėyAuthor, Pro member

Fascinated by music, movies and sitcoms, I’m passionate about social media and can’t live without the internet, especially for all the cute dog and cat pictures out there. I wish the day had about 40 hours to be able to do everything I want. Read more »

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I Took 40 Pictures Of An Astronaut Character Posing Around Futuristic And Dystopian Cities

As a part of her “The Lonely Astronaut” photographic series (started in 2017), I used the empty New York City streets as a futuristic dystopian backdrop to accompany a single lone astronaut during the covid pandemic. Using my friend’s 12-year-old daughter, Kiera, in the astronaut suit, I visited otherwise extremely populated areas like Times Square, The Brooklyn Bridge, and Chinatown.

Continue reading I Took 40 Pictures Of An Astronaut Character Posing Around Futuristic And Dystopian Cities

The Way Designers Transformed This Tiny 22m2 (236ft2) Space Is Genius

As housing prices keep going up, people are choosing smaller, more affordable homes. Many times these homes come with a challenge – to use all of the available space for all necessary furniture and household appliances. One design team from Taipei City, Taiwan, called ‘A Little Design’ have taken on such a challenge for one of their customers.

Continue reading The Way Designers Transformed This Tiny 22m2 (236ft2) Space Is Genius

Someone Shares A London Apartment Listing For Over $250K, And People Share What Other Homes You Can Buy For The Same Price

If you’re in the market for a home, you’ve probably seen your fair share of ludicrous listings. Weird interiors, bizarrely planned out spaces, and horrible carpeted bathrooms – you never know what you’ll stumble upon. However, Twitter user Just_RichardB has recently shared a real estate listing for an apartment in London that just might take the cake.

At first glance, it doesn’t seem that bad. Sure, it’s pretty terrible and claustrophobic, but it’s not uncommon to see these types of apartments of up for rent in big cities like London or New York. The thing that makes this listing especially terrible is the asking price – a whopping 200k pounds (~255k USD). People simply couldn’t believe that an apartment the size of a cardboard box could cost that much and quickly pointed out that you can purchase four-bedroom homes in other parts of the country for roughly the same price!

Continue reading Someone Shares A London Apartment Listing For Over $250K, And People Share What Other Homes You Can Buy For The Same Price

I Use Everyday Objects To Create Quirky Miniature Worlds (15 New Pics)

I’ve spent 5 years creating this project called “Tiny Wasteland.” The series features miniature figures placed next to everyday objects in order to create the illusion of microscopic worlds.

I’m actually a food photographer, so the whole idea came from there. I’ve made about 200 pictures already from this tiny world; the rest you can find on my Instagram page.

Continue reading I Use Everyday Objects To Create Quirky Miniature Worlds (15 New Pics)