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This TV Just Solved an Age-Old Interior Design Problem

Yves Béhar and Samsung are teaming up on a television that’s a legitimate work of art.

BY SCOTT CHRISTIAN

MAR 14, 2017

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Samsung

When it comes to interior design, TVs are a bit of a conundrum. Furniture and wall art create a specific aesthetic, but then suddenly you throw a rectangle of black plastic and glass into the space and the design flow is totally interrupted (which is exactly why an entire industry exists to create furniture that hides TVs). But Swiss designer Yves Béhar decided to take a different approach: make a TV that actually looks like a work of art.

Continue reading This TV Just Solved an Age-Old Interior Design Problem

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Impressions on designing for senior living

Susan Mulholland

Monday, March 13, 2017

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Impressions on designing for senior living

This is the time of year when conferences are the norm. Every month there is another advertisement in a design journal for a conference that has a unique take on a specific market.

Do you remember the first design conference you ever attended? I started thinking about that when I decided to attend a new one for the first time: the Environments for Aging Conference held Feb. 26 to March 1 in Las Vegas.

I should tell you that I didn’t go to this event cold — I have been working in senior living for more than a decade, but this is the first time I had the opportunity to attend this conference.

The EFA conference is unique because it isn’t just for design professionals. Operators and healthcare providers as well as people who are interested in the well-being of seniors are also in attendance. Like the Healthcare Design conference, this conference focuses more on education than products — although there were plenty of great new things to see from manufacturers who attended the event.

People who choose to work in senior living have a different take on the aging process. Even as designers, we look at aging as something that is just part of living. Designing spaces for a segment of the population we will be a part of can be challenging, especially when the idea of aging and what it means is changing at such a rapid pace.

Senior living is and has been a big market segment for much of the past decade and will continue to be one because of our increasing aging population. As seniors become the largest population segment using the built environment, the design of all buildings becomes critical for creating a better quality of life as we age.

Aging can be big business as we have seen in other areas of the marketplace. The old ideas of aging are just that — old. No one wants to be thought of as old, so our environments shouldn’t be either. That is the basis for this conference.

As a new attendee, my hope was that by spending time with like-minded people I would share new ideas and come away with a fresh approach to creating better places for seniors.

As I made my way to the first event of the conference, the keynote speaker made some interesting points. We need to think about how we live so we can continue to do so and not give up what we enjoy just because we are considered old. Our environment and lifestyle have a big impact on how well we age.

As I sat in the audience listening to this speech, I began to think about my own lifestyle choices. I also started thinking about how my design choices were affecting the people I have never met who are using these spaces. As designers, we are charged with the task of designing for a variety of situations including change. Senior living is all about change.

I’m intrigued by the idea that there is no right design or building type to accommodate the ever-changing idea of what old is. Taking all that I have learned from the design professionals in attendance and from leading gerontologists who are looking at aging from a scientific perspective is part of the reason why attending this conference was so important.

I found that although I have been to conferences before, nothing quite compared to this one. I think the reason comes down to the individuals who are in attendance — we all share the same passion. I am looking forward to attending the EFA conference again next year to learn more and to see how the new environments being built are helping to create a better quality of life.

It is has made me think of what I want in a living environment when I am a senior, and it isn’t necessarily here. The change in building environments for seniors is just getting started; new ideas are becoming reality every day. We have a lot to look forward to for living and aging well now and in the future.

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About the Author

Susan Mulholland

Susan Mulholland studied interior design at Northern Arizona University and is an NCIDQ certificate holder. She has more than 25 years of interior design experience in commercial and residential design. Her design philosophy includes sustainable design practices for all types of projects. Her experience in the industry includes working in healthcare, senior living, hospitality and corporate design. Her design studio Mulholland Art & Design Commercial Interiors is in Tucson, Arizona, where she has been helping her clients with consulting and design on purposeful interior projects for the past 17 years.

Learn more about Susan and the work she does at Mulholland Art & Design Commercial Interiors. Connect with her on Facebook and LinkedIn.

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Interior designer Tara Bernerd on how to do luxury with character

From black marble to colored glass

Ceramic tiled flooring and concrete walls at the SIXTY SoHo hotel in New York City
All photos courtesy Tara Bernerd & Partners

British interior designer Tara Bernerd knows a thing or two about luxury. Known for her work for posh boutique hotels like the Thompson Chicago and SIXTY SoHo, Bernerd operates on the opposite extreme of sterile-hotel stereotypes, creating instead warm spaces rich in color and texture.

In Tara Bernerd: Place, a new book out this month spotlighting the London-based designer’s work, we get a sense of how the same ideas she employs for dynamic hospitality spaces can also be applied broadly in private homes, residential developments, and, yes, yachts.

To find out how one can channel some of Bernerd’s style, we asked the designer for some insight into how she created a few of the intriguing spaces showcased in Place. Below, check out Bernerd’s design notes, which have been edited and condensed for clarity.

How to zone open-plan spaces

A bespoke bookshelf-cum-fireplace creates a cozy zone in Bernerd’s own home

How to liven up a muted palette

A subdued but dynamic room in the Center Parcs Treehouse hotel in the U.K.

How to work with raw materials

Brick, iron, and timber mix in the hotel lobby at Thompson Chicago

How to use black in the bathroom

Black marble and mirrored glass in a guest bathroom at The Hari London

How to make a statement with glassware

Dark-hued glassware is an accent in this Hong Kong penthouse

Continue reading Interior designer Tara Bernerd on how to do luxury with character

Fiber.Seal

Fiber-Seal is your #1 source for fabric and furniture protection services across the United States. The Fiber-Seal Fabric Care System combines superior fabric treatment products with exceptional follow-up service.

We strive every day to provide a service that is unparalleled by any other fabric protection company, which is why we have been recommended by industry professionals for over 47 years. We provide furniture protection service in both residential and commercial settings by partnering with homeowners, design professionals, and facility managers to help keep their interiors looking clean and beautiful, day after day. 

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Improving Experiential Living Through Collaborative Paradigms

12.06.2018

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There has been a lot of discussion around combining or sharing design verticals, merging of how we live, work, relax, gain access to services and interact. Interesting inventive terms include “resimmercial,” “resitality,” “healthitality,” “eduhealth.” I imagine there will be more terms evolving as trends continue to overlap in various design segments.

Overall, this is the opportunity to create experiential design by not assuming that old norms, design assumptions and previous modes of operating are relevant to today’s world. They aren’t – change is the constant.

PWP Studio. Courtesy of Emerald Expositions and Contract, Healthcare Design, Environments for Aging, Design: Retail, and Hospitality Design. From left to right: Margaret McMahon, senior vice president and managing director, Wimberly Interiors; Jane Rohde, principal, JSR Associates; Dina Griffin, president, Interactive Design Architects; Suzen Heeley, executive director of design and construction, facilities management division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Robin Guenther, principal, Perkins+Will; Roya Sullivan, national director of window presentation, Macy’s; Ave Bradley, creative director and global senior vice president of design, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants; Lauren Geremia, principal, Geremia Design; and Cindi Kato, PAVE Board president and vice president and global retail business development director, CallisonRTKL.

WORKING AND LIVING

Working women – per the 1980s movie “Nine to Five” with Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda — identified the issues with diversity and equality in the workplace, equal work for equal pay and many ills with the inequality faced in business.

Fast forward to 2018 and the experience economy, an individual could be doing business while sitting in a coffee shop in New York working with someone in Shanghai that they had never met in person, but are working together because of expertise, similar ideas or collaboration that’s needed to bring about a successful business relationship that could change the world.

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Flexibility, personal responsibility and trust are necessities for businesses to be successful. The intermixing of experience and generations brings about new solutions to address everything from housing shortages to social problems to delivery of services and products.

Embracing inclusivity and the crossover between work and living are no longer linear, but separations are blurred. Work and living overlaps and can take place wherever and whenever as long as the mission, project constraints, expectations and business outcomes are clearly delineated and met from the beginning of a project. If workers agree to this framework, then flexibility and trust can develop to create success.

WOMEN IN DESIGN AWARD

During the Women in Design event held in New York on Oct. 30, 2018, I had the opportunity to accept my Women in Design Award at the end of the program and was simply dazzled by the stories of the 10 talented designers that were honored before me.

Two particular stories made me start thinking of how collaboration could be completed differently in the future – perhaps in support of person-centered initiatives that could create a tipping point for the future of designing for elders and vulnerable populations, and supporting experiential design for all people.

One was Roya Sullivan, the national director of window presentation for Macy’s. Her designs were colorful, fun and playful; the image of a chameleon with bright green Adidas sneakers stood out for me. Roya talked about the difficulty in retail and the balance between online purchasing and the tangibility of creating windows that provoked an experience.

The Women in Design Award

The Women in Design award handcrafted by Kristen Bonnel and Christine Sheu from Eventscape in Canada. The bottom wood portion represents the percentage of women in leadership roles in design and white portion represents the percentage of men in leadership roles in design. The goal is for the wood portion to grow higher every year as more women raise up to take on leadership roles and provide innovative design solutions.

I looked at the images and thought: ’How could we take that energy and creativity of the wonderful window design and apply it to senior living so that experiential living was part of elders’ daily lives?’ Wow! This could be an absolute game changer.

Let’s no longer look at what we have done, but what could happen if we simply started from scratch, took a fresh look, and reinvented the thought process and framework for developing an entire new paradigm that meets housing, service, and amenity needs – not just for elders, but for all people. This would apply to the built environment as much as to product design.

The other designer that stood out for me was Lauren Geremia, principal at Geremia Design in the Bay Area. She has completed spaces for Instagram and Dropbox – based upon completing spaces that created an experience that was notable for those starting dot-com businesses.

This is the mixing of daily living with working as part of the culture and environment. Can this approach to design talk to housing solutions that mix with daily living experiences for older adults and younger children that have been traditionally institutionalized – not by choice, but by necessity? Is there a design solution that intermixes generations and can be openly supported by the community at-large? Is it true, if needs are expressed to the community, that they will raise up and collaboratively change the living circumstances for so many that simply need to be seen and heard, and need a bit of assistance to positively move forward with their lives?

THANKSGIVING

The week before Thanksgiving, I went to visit my goddaughter and her daughter at Johns Hopkins University. Her daughter has a hereditary cancer that her grandfather had died from a number of years ago. She had successfully made it through surgery, removing portions of her thyroid and adrenals. Her simple request was for a Popeye’s 5-piece box of chicken tenders, so I knew she was on the mend. When I got there, the father of her 9-month-old son brought in the baby. We were reminiscing some, but then the conversation became more serious.

None of them, including the baby’s father, who lost his own dad in August, has stable, consistent housing. The two women have jobs and the young man is in technical school with the ultimate goal to work in construction.

The discussion revolved around the need for housing. The current conditions include couch surfing, kind friends and distant relatives as part of the network to find a place to sleep so that they can get up and make it to work, babysitters’ and school. In this small microcosm of safety of the hospital room, I could feel all of their concern, worry and anxiety. But for that one moment, everyone was safe, feed and knew where they would be sleeping that night, but not for the next nights following. The struggle was real, but the moment was peaceful as the baby laid on his tummy and started to breath heavy with sleep.

How is it that in our nation we don’t have decent housing that could support a working individual long enough to be able to become part of the larger fabric of society? Couldn’t these creative minds that come from all types of design experience and leadership positions come together to change this crisis?

Similar to different ways of living and working, individuals need to be able to build trust and collaboration to move forward and create opportunity for those aging out of foster care, those truly willing to work but know in their hearts that no one wants them when they lose a parent, and change the paradigm for success? The youth is our future and we have need to step up the pace of solutions. We’re losing generations of wonderful, caring and loving people that need to be welcomed into the world of success – supporting, providing and nurturing them; assisting to meet their needs; and believing in them.

On this Thanksgiving, I was grateful for being with my parents in the small town where I grew up. Cooking big pots of squash, beans and ham hocks, and homemade applesauce. All the senses are dancing with the smells and taste of food. My thoughts go to my goddaughter and her family, wishing for all of them to have a place called home. Safe, warm and comfortable, as a right that all people should be able to attain through fortitude and hard work versus being unattainable in a world that doesn’t see so many that are in need.

MOVING TOWARD PERSON-CENTERED LIVING

Design leadership could move the needle positively toward creation of person-centered living. My congratulations to all of the Women in Design honorees – each one inspiring – amazing women doing incredible work. Let us come together as a community and bring about change – share the people and contacts that we have that can support person-centered living – creating a forum that can move the needle in a positive direction.

More Design News | Highlighting Equality & Diversity

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Events

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ASID is proud to serve as a Premier Association Sponsor for the 2019 DesignWell Conference in San Diego, January 22-23, 2019.

The DesignWell Conference will focus on wellness architecture and will present industry thought leaders, including ASID CEO Randy Fiser, Hon. FASID, to raise awareness on how our surroundings impact our health and performance. What began as the green movement to build with environmental protection in mind has evolved to become the foundation for reshaping architecture.

Attend this cutting-edge program and gain the inspiration to take your work to a new level. Network, exchange ideas, learn best practices, and position yourself to positively shape the future of the design and wellness economy.

ASID Members receive $100 off of the registration price.

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Acrovyn Wall Panels

The Acrovyn Wall Panel collection of finishes includes Acrovyn solid colors, Chameleon simulated patterns and now Acrovyn by Design embedded digital imagery, giving you the freedom to create interior environments that range from classic to wildly expressive. Acrovyn is more durable than laminate and stained wood, so your vision will be too.

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ACROVYN WALL PANEL

Acrovyn Wall Panel with Picture Frame Trim

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RENAISSANCE™ WOOD HEADWALL

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RENAISSANCE™ WOOD WALL PANEL

Renaissance™ Wood Wall Panel with Beveled Lumbered Edge

Custom Options: Custom Sizes and Shapes

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Renaissance™ Wood Wall Panel with Radius Lumbered Edge

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Renaissance™ Wood Wall Panel with Square Lumbered Edge

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Renaissance™ Wood Wall Panel with Square Veneered Edge

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Plan your route and you’ll reach your 2019 destination

Fred Berns

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

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Plan your route and you’ll reach your 2019 destination

Many interior design professionals use the holiday season to reflect on the year that was. You’re wise to focus instead on the year that can be.

Use this time to plot your course and make your 2019 sales and marketing plan. Why? Because a designer without a plan is like ship without a rudder. You may have a rough idea of where you want to go, but not a clue on how to get there.

You can “get there” and achieve your goals for the year ahead by keeping these seven “p”rinciples in mind:

1. Positioning.

In competitive times like these, there’s no better way to differentiate yourself than to pinpoint and promote your “Only,” as in “I’m the area’s only window fashion professional who ___.” Tell them what only you do, and they’ll buy only from you.

2. Pipeline.

Build yours — and your business — by doing the “daily dozen.” Smile and dial, and reach out every day to at least 12 industry contacts you need to know — and who need to know you. It’s an easy way to grow your momentum, and your bottom line.

3. Pain.

No pain, no gain. That’s why you should talk, tweet, text, post, present and write about the biggest challenges your ideal prospects face. Focus your marketing on those challenges, and position your firm as the one that can overcome them.

4. Partnership.

There is strength in numbers, and you need not, and you should not go it alone. Align yourself in your marketing with vendors, suppliers, contractors, bloggers, the media and other industry influencers.

5. Pool.

When it comes to selling, follow the lead of professional billiards players. Always set up your next shot.

Ask about Phase II before you start Phase I, talk about designing the vacation as well as primary residence, and discuss the branch offices in addition to the corporate headquarters. Simply put, focus on “next” as well as now.

6. Pricing.

Charge the part of the star that you are. Attach top value to yourself, and price yourself accordingly.

Sell from the top down: offer your best, top of the line products and services before discussing the rest. Let your clients decide what they can and can’t afford.

7. Persistence.

Never, ever give up. Go until “no” — and understand that “no” may simply mean “not now” or “not yet.” The most financially successful design professionals are the most stubborn.

The more specific you are in your goal-setting and planning, the more successful you’ll be in the year ahead. It’s not enough to aim for “bigger projects from better clients.”

You’ll get far better results if you determine, ahead of time, the approximate square footage of your ideal projects, and to decide exactly what you mean by “better clients.”

Success in your interior design business happens by choice not chance. You can choose to make 2019 your breakout year by diligently following some basic business success habits.

The first, and most important of these habits? Make a plan, Stan.

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About the Author

Fred Berns

Fred Berns speaks to, coaches and writes promotional copy for interior design professionals worldwide. For information about his services and products, visit InteriorDesignBusiness.net or contact him at Fred@FredBerns.com or 303-589-3013.

Continue reading Plan your route and you’ll reach your 2019 destination

Business Tools

NAVIGATE TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

ASID understands the challenges associated with business ownership and has developed an exclusive set of member benefits designed to help you navigate the waters to long-term success. These must-have business tools offer our members protection, promotion, coverage, certification, education, and CEUs.

PROTECTION

Residential and Commercial Contract Packages

Business owners must shelter their organizations through strong contracts that limit liability and diminish risk. The ASID Residential and Commercial Contract Packages include a core letter agreement with multiple schedules and clear options for crafting complete, customizable contracts.

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