Man Lives On His Own Private Island In Florida And Here’s How His Life Looks

According to Stephanie Seferian, the host of The Sustainable Minimalists podcast, minimalism is the intentional choice to live with less. Tim Davidson is one of the people who made this choice. And he hasn’t look looked back ever since.

In 2017, Tim was given 60 days to move out of his family’s vacation home in Florida. At first, he thought about buying a traditional-size home. But as time went by, Tim realized that something that big would probably result in unused space, unnecessary belongings, more taxes, and more money.

Davidson decided to focus just on the necessities: a bedroom, living area, small kitchen, and access to the outdoors. So a tiny home looked like the perfect solution.

More info: tiffanythetinyhome.com | Instagram

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In 2017, Tim Davidson’s family told him he had 60 days to move out of their vacation home in Florida

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

“I really learned about minimalism through the Netflix documentary as well as religions that try to have less materialistic things,” Tim told Bored Panda.

“I’ve always kind of been attracted to minimalism without knowing that I was attracted to minimalism. I typically had fewer things than the average American but enough where I could still slim down my lifestyle and really become a true minimalist.”

Experts see at least several potential advantages to minimalist living. For example, Less clutter means less time spent cleaning and organizing, and more hours in the day for family and friends.

“By maintaining a clutter-free environment, you’re able to increase focus and productivity thus reducing stress,” Caleb Backe, a certified health and wellness expert for Maple Holistics, told Oprah Daily.

This increase isn’t just psychological: a 2009 study by Darby Saxbe and Rena Repetti found clutter can actually increase cortisol levels, a.k.a. your stress hormone. Therefore, freeing your home from stuff may help you free your mind as well.

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Just before the deadline, he bought Tiffany, a 270-square-foot tiny house

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Tim picked Tiffany because of the layout and the stained glass throughout the home—his father used to make stained glass lighting fixtures for a living.

“I just felt that it was a perfect fit for me. The layout of the home was exactly what I wanted, it functions very well, and has everything I need.”

Tiffany cost Tim about $70,000.

It got its name from the colorful glass light fixtures

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

In the kitchen, Tiffany is equipped with walnut butcher block counter tops, an oversized farm style sink, 10.3 f00t fridge, and a 20” propane stove which makes cooking a painless task. It’s also hard not to look out the huge custom double-hung Low Emissivity windows to see what is going on outside.

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

He ended up purchasing a tiny island in Florida for $200,000

Image credits: tiffany_the_tiny_home

Tim found the island on Zillow. “It was raw land and not being used as anything, didn’t even have an address,” he recalled. “I ended up knocking on the owner’s door that was selling it and started negotiating pricing from there. I then had 60 days to figure out if I could build a tiny house on there with the city’s permission. And was able to successfully build a tiny house on a foundation.”

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Eventually, Tim realized Tiffany probably wouldn’t survive a strong hurricane

Image credits: tiffany_the_tiny_home

Tiffany also has the NOAH Certification. This means it incorporates nationally recognized safety, construction, and energy efficiency standards currently used by the Home Building & RV industries. Inspections are also video documented and archived whenever Tim needs them.

Image credits: tiffany_the_tiny_home

So he got a 320-square-foot home for $90,000, which is shaped like an octagon and is really sturdy

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

“The octagon home is made by a company called Deltec Homes,” Tim said. “It’s a high-end prefab home built in Asheville North Carolina. It being an octagon helps with aerodynamics intensity winds such as hurricanes. This doesn’t allow when to create pressure on a single wall and allows the wind to move around the home.”

The roof trusses are like spokes on a wheel so if one trust tries to pull up the others act together in order to keep the roof down. “It’s last 50 years with a 99.9% success rate. It’s arguably the strongest tiny house ever built.”

Davidson rents this home on Airbnb to utilize all the space he has and help pay for his living expenses.

This is how the second tiny house looks like inside:

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: tiffanythetinyhome

Image credits: Shellmateisland

Image credits: Shellmateisland

Image credits: tiffany_the_tiny_home

Image credits: tiffany_the_tiny_home

People love Tim’s tiny paradise on Earth

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Follow Bored Panda on Google News!68 Justinas KeturkaAuthor, BoredPanda staff

Justin is a photo editor at Bored Panda. He was fascinated with visual arts and arts in general for as long as he can remember. He was obsessed with playing and making music in his teens. After finishing high school, he took a gap year to work odd jobs and try to figure out what he wanted to do next. Finally, around 2016, he started learning how to use Photoshop and hasn’t stopped since. He started working as a visual advertisement producer in 2017 and worked there for almost two years. In his spare time, he creates graphic collages and even had his first artwork exhibition at “Devilstone”. Read more »Show All Contributors

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